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February 06, 1966 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-06

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,,SUNDAY, YEBILUARY 6,4966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6,1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Washington, Moscow Restless over

Asian Situation

WASHINGTON (P)-Viet Nam
appears to have created an at-
mosphere of frustration and rest-
*lessness both in Washington and
Moscow. But beneath the surfate
there is a vaguely detectable note
of expectancy, perhaps generated
by recent efforts toward peace.
Steam seems to be developing
behind a drive to produce a new
Geneva conference, influentially
supported both in Washington and
at the United Nations.
There is a slender chance that
North Viet Nam, in vehemently,
rejecting a UN role, transmitted
a signal that a new Geneva con-

ference was not entirely impos-
sible. It might depend on the
start of representation offered the
Liberation Front, the Viet Cong's
political arm.
There is no mistaking a sense
of urgency in Washington among
those who worry publicly that
escalation is a self-feeding process
which might lead to disaster.
The Senate had been divided
about evenly on resumption of
bombing in North Viet Nam. Al-
though some acknowledged John-
son's constitutional position, they
complained that his contact with
senators seemed at times like mili-

tary briefings rather than a quest
for advice and consenit.
The President says that as con-
stitutional Commander in Chief
he must give weight to the judg-
ment of his secretaries of state
and defense, his national security
adviser and the military men of
the Joint Chiefs of Staff. It was
from these he got the advice that
continued immunity of North Viet
Nam raised the cost of the con-
flict, and that he had to do what
he saw as his duty to limit those
costs.
"There has never been a Con-
gress quite like this one," one of

its most influential figures said.
He noted an atmosphere of rest-
lessness, nervousness, profound
uneasiness. "And it is growing-it
is growing."
Moscow, too, seems uncomfort-
able. If-as Red China now com-
plains-Moscow "resorted to pres-
sure and coaxing" to push Hanoi
to a conference table, there is
only a trace of evidence that the
effort made an impression.
Still, China is deeply suspicious.
People's Daily of Peking last week
denounced what is called "the
Munich scheme of the Soviet
leaders."

Curiously, the word "Munich" gon, it might mean recognition of
appeared at the other end of the the Viet Cong's political front
spectrum, too. Gen. Tran Thien voice in any negotiations.
Khiem, who represented one of

the war-to-the-end schools in
Saigon and now is Saigon's am-
bassador to Nationalist China, told
an Associated Press reporter a few
days ago:
"I hope we won't repeat the
historical mistake of Munich."
"Munich," to Peking, might
mean providing the United States
with a face-saving way to extri-
cate itself from the awe some po-
tentialities of an expanding war.
To certain military leaders in Sai-

In official Moscow, there ap-
pears to be at least token appre-
ciation of the difficulties of the
U.S. position and an acute aware-
ness of the unpleasant possibili-
ties in Asia.
In Washington, some who de-
plored resumption of the bombing
in the North and supported quiet
diplomacy, now express the opin-
ion that the Viet Cong must be
represented at any Geneva con-
ference. This also is the opinion

of representatives of those UN
members now engaged in a diplo-
matic search for a road to Geneva.
President Johnson said there
were no arbitrary limits in his
search for peace. He stood by the
Geneva agreements and expressed
readiness to meet at "any con-
ference table" to discuss any pro-
posals, to consider the views of
any group.
When Hanoi scorned this and
insisted on advance agreement on
its preconditions, the bombing of
North Viet Nam was resumed. This
implied that the U.S. had no

choice but to do everything pos-
sible to win.
But in Washington one hears
these questions: What does "win"
mean in these circumstances? Is
there any way of really winning?
What would constitute victory?"
Sen. George D. Aiken (A-Vt)
expressed the opinion that while
the war of democracy against
communism could .not be won in
Southeast Asia, it would be lost
there, and that President John-
son had erred "in taking steps
which may lead to a cataclysmic
world conflict."

Johnson

Flies

to

.. Massive U.S. Drives Encounter
Hawa11Iiiimumr Viet Cong Opposition

F-or,
WASHINGTON (A) - Presidi
Johnson headed for Hawaii y
terday for three days of intens
conferences on the Viet Nam v
with four Cabinet members, otl
senior military and diplomatica
visers and heads of the Saig
government.
The trip, the President said
announcing it late Friday, v
give him "a chance to reviewc
'complete program there."
The President took. off with

Viet,
ent party of about a dozen from snow-
es- covered Andrews Air Force Base in
ive nearby Maryland at 12:22 p.m. for
war Honolulu.
her His big Air Force fanjet Boeing
ad- 707 is expected to encounter head-
on winds over the Pacific. Estimated
flying time for the nonstop 4,959-
in mile flight .is 111% to 12 hours.
will No major policy changes are
our likely to emerge from the confer-
ences, which will include United
a States Ambassador to Saigon Hen-

'am.
ry Cabot Lodge; the U.S. com-
mander in Viet Nam, Gen. Wil-
liam Westmoreland; and the two
top officials of the South Viet-
namese government, Premier Ngu-
yen Kao Ky and Nguyen Van
Thieu, chief of state.
As Johnson put it at a news
conference Friday:
"I wouldn't want to anticipate
getting off and making any
changes one way or ,another. I
wouldn't say that we wouldn't
learn some things from the meet-
ing that would cause us either to
improve the situation or strength-
en it, but I would not want you to
anticipate that the purpose of the
meeting was to formulate any dif-
ferent policy at all, because that
is not the purpose."

Discussion

sued a statement which said, in
part:
"We applaud the idea of trying
to find solutions to problems, but
it is reckless and foolish for the
commander in chief, accompanied
by four Cabinet officers and the
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, to take himself osfar from
the capital and power center of
the U.S. in these critical times."
The President took with him
several persons the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee has indicat-
ed it wants to question in its
searching inquiry into Viet Nam.

They include Gen. Maxwell D.
Taylor, former chairman of the
Joint Chiefs of Staff and former
ambassador to South Viet Nam;
and Deputy Undersecretary of
State, U. Alexis Johnson.
Also on the presidential plane
were Secretary of Defense Robert
McNamara and Gen. Earle G.
Wheeler, chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, who told the Sen-
ate committee Friday they do not
choose to testify at public hear-
ings, and Foreign Aid Director
David E. Bell, who was questioned
all day Friday.

SAIGON (M-The gap in two'
massive American drives to clear
Viet Cong from long-held strong-
holds on the central coast nar-
rowed to about three miles last
night.
Opposition was so light as to
suggest the last of the enemy's
hardcorehregiment had fled into
the hills. Local guerrillas alone
seemed to contest broadening of
the allied enclaves that crowd
them back from the sea.
The climax should come while
President Johnson confers in
Hawaii this weekend with the
leaders of Saigon's military gov-
ernment and Gen. William C.
Westmoreland, United States com-
mander in Viet Nam.
U.S. bombers blasted at Com-
munist targets both north and
south of the border. B52 jets from
Guam loosed tons of explosives on
guerrilla hideouts about 40 miles
southeast of Saigon.
Briefing officers announced
Navy planes from the carriers
'Ranger and Kitty Hawk struck a
North Vietnamese military target,
otherwise unidentified, about 30
Smiles north of Vinh, and an am-
munition depot near the coast
only 20 miles above the border.
Radio Hanoi broadcast a de-
claration that a Communist air
force unit - which presumably
means fighter planes - shot down
two U.S. jets Friday. A U.S.

spokesman denied it.
U.S. Marines and air cavalry-
men neared a union on the coast
300 miles northeast of Saigon to
cap their respective offensives-
Operation Double Eagle and Oper-
ation Masher.
Marines were the striking force
and cavalrymen the key element
of the holding force in this maneu-
ver. It was launched Friday with
thus far unrealized hopes of lo-

cating and smashing two elusive
Red units-North Viet Nam's 18th
Regiment and the Viet Cong's
hardcore 2nd Regiment.
The U.S. 1st Cavalry, Airmobile
Division, whose 3rd Brigade star-
red in the allied drive that swept
the Communists from the Viet
Cong sector of Binh Dinh Pro-
vince, flew in another brigade for
the followup, which it has dubbed
White Wing.

I - i

.00 W*41

46Who Is This 'Avon Calling'
Information Do You Give

And What
Him "

world News Roundup

4'
- Y

r . ,4 ,R

Administration sources said the By The Associated Press+
President had had such a trip in BRUSSELS-King Baudoin de-
mind for some time and had been clined to accept the resignation of+
looking for an opportunity to fit Premier Pierre Harmel's coali-+
it into his schedule. Johnson could tion government yesterday and'
have asked the South Vietnamese Belgium's doctors immediately an-+
leaders to come to Washington. nounced they would go on strike
But his journeying ot Hawaii pre- at midnight tonight.
sumably is calculated as a per- The doctors rejected appeals by
sonal demonstration of U.S. back- 'both the king and prime minis-,
ing for the Saigon government. ter for a truce.
Also, he presumably wants to Ar
give Asia and the rest of the world:{ ATHENS - A predawn earth-;
a picture of the U.S. President quake struck north-central Greece
conferring with the Saigon lead- yesterday, killing one person, in-
errngequals.ThetenardgCond- juring 20 seriously and leaving
ers as equals. The standard Coin- hundreds, p e r h a p s thousands,
munist line is that they are Wash- homeless.
ington's puppets. The Greek government declar-
Domestically, the trip for the ed the area from Larisa in north-
time being at least stole some of ern Greece south to Karpenision
the thunder from critics of the in a state of emergency.
U.S. course in Viet Nam, who have * *
been increasingly vocal in recent BEIRUT, Lebanon - Lebanese.
Senate hearings. customs inspectors have seized an-1
Soon after the President's de- other shipment of arms into the
parture, Rep. Bob Wilson (R- country. Police in Beirut announc-
Calif.) chairman of the Republi- ed yesterday that 200 revolvers
can Congressional Committee, is- ! were found in eight parcels mail- .

ed from Spain.
The announcement said the par-
cels were found in the main post
office at the northern seaport of
Tripoli and that several postal
employes have been arrested. The
Spanish source of the parcels was
not disclosed.

program schedule
THE
NEW YORK
PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Tune in the Philharmonic each Sunday at 2:00 p.m.,
(WUOM-FM, 91.7 on your dial), brought to you through
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The current program schedule is:
Sunday, February 6
BERNSTEIN, Conducting; STERN, Violinist;
GOMBERG, Oboist
Bach: Concerto for Violin & Oboe; Bach: Violin Concerto
in E major; Prokofieff: Symphony No. 5
Sunday, February 13
BERNSTEIN, Conducting; FRANCESCATTI, Violinist
Smith: Symphony No. 2; Bernstein: Serenade;
Copland: Symphony No. 3
ANN ARBOR FEDERAL SAVINGS
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Soviets See Moon Pictures;
Volcanic Action Indicated

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-The Russian, people
saw close-up pictures of the
moon's surface last night, 24 hours
after they were viewed by millions
in the West. At the same time
Tass announced the Soviet Union's
Luna 9 station was completing its
research program on the moon.
The station landed on the moon
Feb. 3 at 21 hours, 45 minutes, 30
seconds Moscow time-1.45.30 p.n.
EST. The antennas unfolded 4
minutes, 10 seconds later and
transmissions of pictures to earth
began at 4:50 a.m. Moscow time,
Feb. 4-8:50 p.m. EST, Feb. 3.
Orders to take and transmit the
pictures were sent from earth.
All systems operated normally.

Tass said the area of the moon
chosen for a landing was typical
of that earth satellite and "of ob-
vious interest for detailed studies."
It said Luna 9 brought the day
closer when man will land on the
moon and observatories be set up
there.
The Luna 9 may be sitting on a
gold mine lunar geologist Harold
Masursky said yesterday.
The sharply defined surface pic-,
tures transmitted by Luna 9 show
a glassy volcanic lava bed like
many found in California.
A study of the pictures seems
to prove beyond doubt that vol-
canoes have exploded over vast
areas of the moon and may still
be active in some sections.

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