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February 04, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-04

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. PAdt sly

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FR.MAV PPIROITAU,%r A IQ,2,0

PAGE IX T E MICIGANDAIL

r5nIA Y, L# 5K~UAKY , 1966

W

U .yjI

Schedule Plays Major Role Grapplers Tangle with Illini Pitt
IF. dT-rT

School Time
is
OLYMPIA

'E

TIME,

( ' iytt[. '6Ai

University Typewriter Center
Home of OLYMPIA, the Precision Typewriter
613 E. William St 665-3763

FOUR HEADS ARE
BETTER THAN ONE

STAN KEMP
WALLY GABLER

JOHN O'REI I LY
BOB WALSH

In T111 ht Bi
Ifli gn Dg i
By DAN OKRENT
Some years ago, an inspired
psychologist constructed a wooden
maze, placed an untrained mouse
on one end and a piece of cheese
on the other.
Some years later, a "profes-
sional" (professional meaning the
retention of the requisite of de-
pravity) scheduler drew up a
fiendish plan of little cross-in-
dexed boxes, randomly threw in
some names and dates and called
it a schedule.
Now it's going to have to help
determine which mouse is going
to get the cheese.
Five at Top
"There are , five good teams
right up near' the top," declares
a disgruntled Larry Glass, head
of the disgriuntled Northwestern
Wildcats, five-times beaten and
buried deep in the corner of the
Big Ten's cellar. "The only way we
can give one of them a definite
edge is to determine who has the
scheduling advantage."
Good luck, fella. An advantage
on this schedule would entail
eight consecutive postponements.
Glass, whose team has faced
four of the top five contenders en
route to their far-from-sparkling
record, is in as good a position as
any to judge the relative merits
of the teams.
State Great?
"Michigan State has a great
front line and the best defense;
Iowa, well-stocked in talent, is al-
most impossible in their press;
Minnesota can be great when
healthy; and you can't take issue

Br'ing you Ann Arbor's most complete,

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on-thetspot,, coverage
of all U of M home basketball games

en cageRnace
with Illinois' record. And, of
course, you know all about Mich-
igan.
"I couldn't pick a winner among
them, however. Only the schedule
can do that."
For the benefit of the home-
town fans, we'll start with Mich-
igan. They've already met Minne-
sota and Illinois for the only times
this season, and they have a home-
and-home with I o w a. Sounds1
good? Well, top it off with this:'
The Wolverines close the season
at State.
State? Well, the denizens of
the pasture lands have the definite
advantage of a single non-return
home match with Illinois, along
with the curtain-closer with Mich-
igan. But they lost at Iowa City,
don't have a chance to make it
up, and meet Minnesota only on
the road.
The Illini won't see Michigan
again or State at home, and they'll
meet Iowa on their own Cham-
paign hardwoods. But they have
to travel to Minnesota.:
Gophers on the Go
The Golden Gophers not only
have to return the' Illinois visit,
but they journey to the corn
country to meet perennial enemy
Iowa after the home visit from
MSU.
Even though Iowa travels to Ann
Arbor and Champaign, they'll get
their chances when Michigan and
Minnesota drop by at home.
And they all lived happily ever
after.
In other words, the schedule's
only 'good point-for anybody-is
that it ends. Michigan mentor
Dave Strack supports this by
stating "that the schedule isn't
going to win any championships
for anyone-not this year or next.
The team that takes it will be,
plainly and simply, the best team."
And who is that? "Well," the
coach hints, "I know who I want
it to be."
Does the coach think that this
year's Big Ten is comparable to
that of last year? "I don't think
so. The teams haven't found re-
placements for the numerous
stars that left after last season."
In other words, this might all
be foolish conjecture: the cheese
might be bigger than the mouse.

Sundays are supposedly days of
rest. For this reason the wrestling
team will be looking forward to
this upcoming Sabbath. The busy
matmen will have two meets in
two days as they battle Illinois

Dufek
Retires

WCBN-650
Now serving University Towers
Sunday, February 6-7:00 P.M.
Ecumenical Campus Ministry continues
a series on China
"CURRENT DEVELOPMENT AND
PROBLEMS IN CHINA'S ECONOMY"
-Background analysis for Chinese economic
development since 1949
-Current economic development
-Problems confronting !the People's Republic
Leader: DR. CHU-YUAN CHENG
i Research Economist, Center for Chinese Studies1
at the PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER

Michigan's football team suffer-
ed another jolt this week as Don
Dufek, a defensive coach for the
past three years, resigned from
the Wolverine brain trust. He thus
becomes the second coach to leave
the Michigan staff in the past two
weeks.
Prior to Dufek's announcement,
defensive coach Bob Hollway veri-
fied that he had accepted a post
with a Detroit business firm. This
leaves the Wolverines with the
task of filling two assistant coach-
ing positions.,
Dufek, defensive backfield coach,
has been a member of the Michi-
gan staff for the past twelve years.
He was appointed to his present
position after serving as freshman
coach for four years. Dufek joined
the staff of former coach Bennie
Oosterbaan in 1954.
Dufek will leave coaching to
train for a general manger post
for one of the plants of a mobile
home company. He, along with his
wife and five children, will move
to Elkhart, Ind.
"The job presents an opportun-
ity too good to turn down,", ex-
plained the 36-year-old former
Michigan great. "I have a large
family to consider."
Dufek was one of Michigan's
great fullbacks gaining national
acclaim in 1948-49-50. Probably
his greatest feat was scoring both
of the touchdowns in the 1951
Rose Bowl as the Wolverines de-
feated California 14-7. He was
named the player of the game.
"I have spent a lot of fine days
here," Dufek noted. "My brightest
memories are coaching at Michi-
gan and going back to the Rose
Bowl last year. The outcome of
the game made it that much more
enjoyable."

"y VtXx i, ci.n Z r V"JLF

U11 r'11L-kuuna uILLSOrg -atui-we try to be up for all 0of hem.

day.
Although Illinois is down after
losing some excellent wrestlers by,
graduation, Michigan Coach Cliff3
Keen is always afraid of what
might happen. Aware that the
Illini have two proven fine wrest-
lers in Fred Aprati and Bob Lef-
fredo, the matmen are readying
themselves for the encounter.
Aprati is a senior who last year
wrestled Wolverine captain Bill
Johannesen to a draw and who
promises to give Johannesen as
fine a fight as ever this Friday
in Yost Fieldhouse. Bob Leffredo,
a sophomore, is one of the best
newcomers in the Big Ten despite
the fact that his entrance to the
wrestling scene is recent, he has
in that time proven himself to be
a tough competitor.
Last week after the trouncing of
Purdue 32-0, Keen commented
that the wrestlers probably were
mentally up for the game after
losing to Minnesota. However, this
weekend there is no way to tell
if the matmen can keep all of that
revenging spirit displayed against
Purdue, particularly since the
weekend is to host two meets.
"Fire Up"
"I don't know if we will be
fired up but I expect a good per-
formance," said Keen. "The team
has definitely improved and is im-
proving with every match, and

By CARL RAYFORD I nn Prirlav nnri Pifbzhiir"orh gofill"_ Ilia fPlY f A.a....._1[.

This is not one of those things
which you can just say."
The Illini come into Yost Field-
house Friday bearing an injury
to Jim Lehnerer, the regular for
the 167 pound division. In his
place Larry Watt, will challenge
Bill Waterman \who got one of
FCA Meets
The Fellowship of Christian
Athletes will visit the Maxey
Boys' Training School at Whit-
more Lake this Sunday. They
will leave at 4:15 p.m., have
supper and discussion hour with
the boys at the school, and then
return to the campus by 8 p.m.
Any athletes who desire further
information about or wish to'
participate in this visit or other
activities of F.C.A. are asked to
call Mark Thompson at 662-
1777.
Michigan's falls last week.
Green Teamj
The Illini Coach admits, "This is
a green outfit for the most part,
but we are coming along pretty
good. This squad has possibilities,
but we have to improve or we're'
not going very far."
Pittsburgh, a ferocious opponent
in past competition, has played the
Wolverines fourteen times, win-
ning six and losing eight meets.

amitting that he doesn't know
much about Pitt. Keen knows
enough, they are tough. The day
:after the Illini leave, the Panthers
come roaring out of the East as
one of the toughest teams in that
area of the country.
Extra Man
Michigan will have to adjust its
game winning alignment to meet
Pitt, for eastern teams have a
different weight class system. In-
stead of the 147 pound division.
Cal Jenkins will wrestle as a 145
pounder, Burt Merical will do
battle at 152 pounds not 157 and
fir the 160 pound category, a new-
comer, Fred Stehman, will contend
with Pittsburgh's Clair Riley. This
system makes for one extra per-
son in the lineup and for Michi-
gan that extra person is Stehman.
The meet against Pitt is Michi-
gan's homecoming meet and is the
last dual meet of the season. Both
the Illini and Pittsburgh will meet
the Wolverines at three o'clock on
Friday and Saturday respectively
in Yost Fieldhouse. This promises
to be a trying weekend for the
Michigan matmen.
Keen, leery of making hasty
statements or predictions about
the probable outcome of the games
only maintains that, "This is a
step in the dark. We don't lnow
exactly what to expect, but we will
find out."

h

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OVER 800 ENTRIES:

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Bin
The Grand Ole Opry's going full
blast, Tootsie's Orchid Lounge
in Nashville is packed, and
country boys in rhinestone suits
are walking around town with
$250,000 in their pockets..
Country music's hit it big.
The Saturday Evening Post
tells how it happened. Read
why the new "uptown" sound
has caught on . . . about the
A&R men who really call the
shots ... about the performers
such as Roger Miller, Buck
Owens, Johnny Cash, Ernest
Tubb -and the greatest of
them all, the legendary Hank
Williams.
Also in the Post, an out-
spoken and simple solution to
draft card burning. It could be
acceptable to both militarists
and conscientious objectors.
Read the Feb. 12 issue of -. -
THE SATURDAY EVENING POST
ON SALE NOW.

U E

By BOB McFARLAND
A three-ring circus would be
calm and serene in comparison to
the appearance that Yost Field
House will take today and tomor-
row as several hundred cindermen
swarm into Ann Arbor to partici-
pate in the Michigan Relays.
The Wolverines, hosting the big
indoor carnival, will be fresh from
an impressive opening in. the
Western Michigan meet last Sat-
urday. Picking up two firsts, four
seconds, and eight thirds, the
Michigan track squad put on one
of the best team showings in the
gargantuan affair although no
point totals were kept.
Competition tonight and tomor-
row should prove to be just as
difficult as encountered last week.
However, one significant addition
consists of Michigan's neighbors
to the North, the Spartans. Be-
sides Michigan State, other tough
opposition will be provided by
Western Michigan, Cincinnati,
Kentucky, Eastern Michigan, Chi-
cago Track Club, Middle Tennes-
see State, and Toledo.
Concentrating on the distance
relays, the Wolverines will field
teams in the distance medley re-
lay, the two mile relay, and the
three mile relay, along with a two

team entry in the university mile
relay.
Mighty Spartan Challenge
Michigan State, defending Big
Ten outdoor champions, can be
expected to show their greatest
strength in the hurdles. -Led by
football end Gene Washington, the
crack Spartan hurdlers' won the
shuttle hurdle relay at the Mich-
igan Qpen last year. Washington
will be joined by Clinton Jones,
Bob Steele, and Fred McKoy in a
unit that will. attempt to make it
two in a row.
Washington won't be able to
rest on last year's clockings in the
individual hurdle events. Mich-
igan's Roy Woodton streaked to
victory at Kalamazoo in the 60-
yard highs, setting a new meet
record in the process with a time
of :07.4. He and sophomore Woodie
Fox, who placed third behind
Woodton, will have to be reckoned
with by the Spartans.
The lineup for the majority of
the individual events will be bas-
ically the same as last week for'
the Wolverines. Slated for the shot
put will be the identical Michigan
quartet which dominated the
event at Western Michigan. Jack
Harvey, Steve Leuchtman, Paul,
D'Eramo, and Bob Thomas make
up the muscle-bound Wolverine

CORRECTION
NAT HENTOFF
WILL BE SPEAKING AT 7
AT HILL AUDITORIUM
TON IGHT
INSTEAD OF 8 IN RACKHAM

crew that took four of the top
five places in their first 1966 meet.
Hope for New Heights
The captain of 'the Michigan
cindermen, George Canamare, will
be facing one of his rivals from
last week, Western's Seeley. Both
Canamare and Seeley, who placed
third and fourth, respectively, in
the pole vault, cleared the bar at
15, along with two other entries.
Places were awarded on the basis
of, the fewest misses. The field
house record of 14'10" will prob-
ably not survive the weekend.
Traveling the long haul for the
Wolverinesin the three-mile relay
will be Jim Dennis, either Brian
Kelly or Jim- Dolan, Bob Bartels,
and Bob Jarena. Jim Mercer, Ken
Coffin, Elmo Morales, and Cecil
Norde' will make up the two-mile
unit.
Dennis, Dolan, Kelly, arid Alex
McDonald are scheduled for the
distance medley relay squad. Com-
prising the number one mile relay
team will be Bob Gerometta, Mar-
ion Hoey, Clive Laidley, and Mc-
Donald. No Wolverines will be en-
tered in the open mile run.
Frosh to Compete
The Michigan frosh will be com-
peting in the novice diviison to-
night. Living up to their rave
notices, they garnered four first
places last Saturday, and man-
aged to capture a second, and
third place inthe open category.
The novice division will have close
to 500 entries, including a group
from Western Michigan and Mich-
igan State.
The Relays, sanctioned by the
United States Track and Field
Federation, will begin at 6 p.m.
with novice action taking place to-,
night. Prelims in the open divi-
sion are scheduled for noon to-
morrow with the finals starting
at 6:30 p.m.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DALE SIELAFF

I

SUMMER JOB OPPORTUNITIES
Camp Nebagamon for Boys, Lake Nebagamon, Wiscon-
sin, seeks undergraduate men for counseling positions,
especially those preparing for elementary or secondary
education professions. Contact Ward Peterson, Student

Marriage in onemporary Society '
-ireside (hat

Activities Building,
ruary 7th.

for interview appontments, Feb-

by Pal and Tony Stoneburner

' Newman Center
I 331 Thompson

Friday 8:0C

0 P.M.
Feb. 4

f ' -_-

I. ________________________________________ F
for some of you...
michiganensian staff
members will come to
your housing unit for
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