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February 01, 1966 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-01

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TTESDfAY, FEBlRUTARY 1. 1 4

PAGE EIGHT TIlE MICHIGAN DAiLY

- - -- %4AU.-"-% aayva. 1j 1000

I

NEW NATION:
Inadequate Railway System
Threatens Zambian Economy

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN ::

falo, N.Y.-Wlll interview Fri., Feb. 4
at the Engrg. Placement Office, 128-H
West Engrg., interested MS & PhD
candidates in Physics & Aple Math
for positions in Buffalo. Make appoint-
ments at Engrg. Placement Office. If:
you are registered at Bureau of Ap-1
pointments, request credentials be sent
to Engrg.

By The Associated Press
LUSAKA, Zambia-It's been a
year of problems for Zambia's
President Kenneth Kaunda, whose
copper-rich African state gained
independence barely a year ago.
Kaunda's major. headache cen-
ters around a proposed 1,000-mile
rail link with neighboring Tan-
zania-an outlet for his country's
copper wealth..
Landlocked Zambia, roughly the
size of Texas, is the second largest
copper producer in the non-
Communist world.
Rhodesia
The national economy stands or
falls on copper whose export value
in 1964 totalled $392 million-
more than three-quarters of the
country's national income. Most of
the copper must be railed through
white-ruled Rhodesia to the Por-
tuguese - controlled seaports of
Mozambique.
Kaunda fears that someday the
Rhodesian government may close
her borders, cutting off the flow
of Zambian copper to world mar-
kets and crippling Zambia's
economy.
TIdependence for Rhodesia un-
der a white minority government
seems just a matter of time.
Peking Aid?
Although not a foot of rail has
yet been laid, Kaunda sees the
1,000-mile TanZam rail link as the
only longterm guarantee that the
copper will flow freely to its for-
eign customers.
But there are strings attached
to the proposed rail link. Co-
partner in the project is Tan-
zania's President Julius Nyerere,
the first East African leader to
open the door to Communist
China.
Nyerere's acceptance of military
and economic aid from Peking has
given Red China its first stable
foothold in Black Africa. Peking
has indicated it may assist in the
construction of the TanZam rail-
road.
Buffer State
Since her independence in Octo-
ber 1964, Zambia has found her-
self playing the role of a buffer
state-separating the black-ruled
countries of central Africa from
the last remaining white-ruled
bastions of Rhodesia, the Portu-
guese colonies of Angola and Mo-
zahbique, and the Republic of

plot the overthrow of southern
Africa's remaining white govern-
ments.
Caches of arms have been dis-
covered together with Russian and
Communist Chinese sabotage and
guerilla warfare literature. A pas-
sionate plea by President Kaunda,
calling for Red China's inclusion
in the United Nations, has renewed
speculation that the Zambian
leader is indulging in a flirtation
with Peking.
Subversive Elements
On the other hand, Britain has
been offered military bases in
Zambia as a deterrent against
Rhodesia's whites grabbing in-
dependence unconditionally. - All
of which doesn't make for friendly
co-existence between Zambia and
Rhodesia.
In the first flush of independ-
ence, Kaunda welcomed African
freedom fighting organizations. A
host of East, West and nonaligned
embassies set up headquarters in
Lusaka.
Later, to combat growing sub-

versive elements and prevent any
unnecessary incidents, Kaunda
was forced to introduce tough
legislation curtailing their move-
ments. If they wish to travel
further than 25 miles from Lusaka
foreigners must advise the gov-
ernment. Foreign diplomatic mis-
sions are restricted to 12 persons,
Commonwealth countries to 15.
Copper
Zambia's rich copper mines are
managed and financed by British,
American and South African in-
terests. Most of the top mining
officials are white South Africans.
Suddenly Zambia has become a
frontline state-the jumping off
point for militant African na-
tionalists anxious to begin the war
of black liberation against the
Southern white spots.
Meanwhile, President Kaunda
sits on a razor's edge. White-ruled
Rhodesia holds the economic reins
controlling Zambia's copper out-
let to the sea. At present the Tan-
Zam railway link is still a thou-
sand uncharted miles away.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an the, Michigan-Illinois basketball game sl etSUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
official publication of the Univer- on Tues., Feb. 1. Members are to be .C~fl 212PSAB- C
sity of Michigan, for which The at Yost Field House, north lockerj
Michigan Daily assumes no editor- room by 7:15 p.m. Enter north end PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau INTERVIEWS:
ial responsibility. Notices should be doors for admission tickets. Music will of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu- FEB. 1
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to be passed out in the locker room. Dark dents, please call 764-7460 for appoint- Camp Fairwood & Four Way Lodge,
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be- I suit, dark tie, white shirt. ments with the following: Coed, Torch Lake, Mich.-Swimming in-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding I_____ THURS., FEB. 3- structor ,arts & crafts. sports assist-
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday Lecture: The Dept, of Geologand Detroit Civil Service Comm., Detroit ants. Married couples may apply.
for saturday and Sunday. General MieaoyanucsteAnrcn-Degrees in Architect., Chem., Econ., New England Mutual Life Insurance,
Notices may be uhseest y Association of Petroleum Geologists' Gen. Lib. Arts, Geog., Journ., Math, Boston, Mass.-Actuarial students.
mum of two times on request; Day Ditnuse Lcurr r.Gdo Nat. Res., Forestry. Wildlife Mgmt.. FEB. 2-
Calendar items appear once only. DAstaguished Lecturer kDr. Gordon Pharm., Public Health, Soc. Work & I Fair Winds Girl Scout Council, Flint,
Student organization notices are not feet er s oo T e Physics for positions in Art & Des., Mich.-Unit leaders & ass'ts., water-
accepted for publication. fc of Decrease in Porosity with Dept Biol.. Elec. Computing, Mgtmt. Trng., front staff, & business manager,
on il an Ga Reervs i SadstnePersonnel, Public Admin., Public Re - FEB. 3-
Reservoirs," Fri., Feb. 4, at 4 p.m. in
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1 s.lations, Recreation, Statistics, Writing. Equitable Life Insurance, N.Y.C. -
Room 2054 Natural Science Bldg. Conservation, etc. Actuarial students.
Jordan March (Allied Stores Corp.), * *
Day Calendar Lecture: Prof. B. Rajan, University Miami, Fla.-Dec. & April Gen. Lib. For details & appointments, stop in
of Windsor, Ont., will lecture on "Con- Arts Grads for mgmt. trng., mkt, res., at Summer Placement, 212 SAB.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem- tinuity in Milton's Poetry" in Aud. & merchandising.
rnar-"The Management of Managers": A, Angell Hall, at 4:10 p.m., on Thurs., Central Intelligence Agency, Wash., =-
Michigan Union, 8 a.m. Feb. 3. All interested persons are in- D.C. & Overseas-Jr. Officer Trng. Pro-
vited to attend, gramn (JOTP), a highly selective pro- 3 C O S -B Y
Fire Instructors Conference - Civil _____tn.gram, provides young officers with key: B ILL
Defense and Disaster Training Center, 5-Hour Special Topics in Chemistry positions. BA, grad study helpful, B
8:30 a.m. -7th Series: Dr. Hans H. Brintzinger, plus average essentialuKnowl. of for-
University of Basel, Switzerland, will e langu A. Agrea21-35. U.S. citizen
Ā«Management Development Seminar - pa on "Metal Catalyzed Reactions."'ms aeM.Ae2-5 ..ctzne e f e
"Better Letter and Report Writing": The third topic will be "Mechanis for 5 yrs. Also positions at various de-
Michigan Union, 1:30 p.m. of Some Heterogeneous Hydrogenation gree levels including Phych., Physics,
and Oxygenation Reactions," to be heldE ., Geog., Math, Forestry, Journ.,Wecarry a la r
Depts. of Classical Studies and His-onWdFb2,a8pm.inRm Languages. Astro., etc. Young women- '' ar a
tory Lecture-Donald C. Earl, The Uni- 300 f the Chemistry Bldg.m R qualified stenographers & typist for of
versity, Leeds, England, "The Roman foreign assignment.
Aristocratic Ideal": Aud. A, Angell FRI., FEB. 4-
Hall, 4:30 p.m Fore n ir. General Foods Corp., White Plains
Foreign ig Vsitors N.Y.-Degrees in Econ., Gen. Lib. Arts, B ILL COSB'i
Dept. of Architecture Lecture-Kings- Biochem., Analyt. & Gen. Chem
bury Marzolf, "Historical Architecturej Journ.. Speech, etc. for positions in' Our new open ing ho
of Scandinavia": Architecture Aud., The following are the foreig visi- sales, production. advtg., mgmt. tn
7:30 p.m. tors programmed through the Interna- mkt. res., personnel, purchasing, sta-
tional Center who will be on campus tistics, R. & D. Locations throughout
Professional Theatre Program Per- this week on the dates indicated. Pro- U.S.
formance-American Conservatory The- gram arrangements are being made by Massachusetts Indemnity & Life In-
atre Company in Moliere's "Tartuffe": Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International surance Co., Detroit-Men.Dec. & Apil
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, 8 p.m. Center, 764-2148. grads in any field including Bus. & E.Liberty
Basketball-U-M vs. Illinois, Yost Zoran Gavrilovic, professor of aes- - rMUSIC
Fieldhuse, p~m.thetics, philological faculty, UniversityI SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:
Fieldhouse, 8 p.m. of Belgrade, editor in charge of theory Cornell Aeronautical Lab., Inc., Buf-
.- t T _of literature- nuhlihim hnim "Pn+'

DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiat-Checker
WE LEASE CARS
as low as $4.50 per 24 -hr. day
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART

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LIVES ON
the show!

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curs-1 0:00 A. M.

Senate Report Charges
Teach-In Communist Led

r
SHOP

0

Phone
662-0675

Collegiate Press Service
BOULDER, Colo.-Another in a
long series of government reports
rolledoff thenpresses of the Gov-
ernment Printing Office in Wash-
ington last week, and like most
such documents, it was scarcely
noted in the nation's capital.
But in faraway Colorado the
second printing of the Senate In-
ternal Security Subcommittee's
report on the teach-in movement
was noticed, and hailed as a vic-
tory.
In the original printing of the
report, a statement from an un-
named correspondent in Boulder
attacked several of the university's
professors and the Colorado Daily
in connection with two teach ins
held at the schools.
Brainwashing
The anonymous correspondent
who allegedly wrote the report
about the University of Colorado
accused " the same faculty group
which staged both teach ins con-
trols the student newspaper." The
result, the report went on to say,
"is that 14,000 of our students are

subject to a continuous teach-in
type brainwashing."
On the page that was devoted
to that report, this statement now
appears :
"Material originally appearing
in this space, havingybeen found
erroneous in certain respects, has
been deleted. All remaining ma-
terial in this column has been
checked and found accurate; and
none of it has been the subject of
complaint."
Faceless Fink
The 256-page report is titled
"The Anti-Vietnam Agitation and
the Teach-In Movement," and
deals with "the problem of Com-
munists infiltration and exploita-
tion." 'It discusses teach-ins at
several schools, attempting to show
that they were Communist led.
The reaction in Colorado was
quick. The state's senators, Gov.
John Love, the president of the
university and other officials
quickly wrote subcommittee vice-
chairman Jen. Thomas J. Dodd
(D-Conn), under whose auspices
the report was prepared, to protest
the statement.
Debates were held on campus
and the subcommittee was round-
ly denounced. It was the policy
at such meetings to leave a vacant
chair on stage for the "faceless
fink" who authored the report,
should he want to defend his
stand. He never did.
HAIRSTYLING
to Please
-CONTINENTALS
-COLLEGIATE
-RAZOR CUTS
6 BARBERS
The Dascola Barbers
(Near Michigan Theatre)

V1iurtr, pu sn ng nouse -Pro-
eneral Notices sveta," Belgrade, Jan. 1-Feb. 4.
Alberto Spreafico, associate professor,
Marching Band: The University of faculty of political science, University
Michigan Marching Band will play at of Florence, Rome, Italy, Feb. 6-8.

Happiness is not having
to do the dishes . . .
DINE AT
POOR RICHARD'S CAFE
331 Thompson
Open 7:00 A.M.-6:30 P.M.

mmmm

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
1000 to 2000 WORDS A MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE - SAVE TIME - IMPROVE CONCENTRATION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour usina the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your required
reading and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus areused in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment in
reading.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adjacent to the U. of M. campus, beginning on February 15.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public DEMONSTRATION of the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method, and see it applied by U. of M. students who have recently completed the course.
BRING A BOOK!
Demonstrations will be held at the BELL TOWER INN, located at 300 S. Thayer St.
(across from Hill Auditorium)
MONDAY, January 31 at 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, February 3 at 7:30 P.M.
TUESDAY, February 8 at 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, February 10 at 7:30 P.M.
NATIONAL SCHOOL OF ACCELERATED READING, Inc.
507 FIFTH AVE. NEW YORK 17, N.Y.

A

South Africa.
Lusaka 4s a
where African

city of intrigue,
freedom fighters

'Decorator
furnished, fully carpeted
UflVERSITY TOWERS
" Now renting for Aug.
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONE: 761-3536,

~II
I
*

THE STRAIGHT STUFF
THAT'S WHAT YOU'LL GET MONDAY
THROUGH THURSDAY AT 11:15 P.M.
When WALLY GABLER
and STAN KEMP
REPORT THE LATEST SPORTS-
PRESENTED BY TICE'S MENSWEAR
WCBN-650
NOW SERVING UNIVERSITY TOWERS

r

rd"

HAVE YOU STOOD UP?
Over 300 Faculty Members Have
They have contributed to the legal defense of
their students who have lost their draft defer-
ments because they protested against govern-
ment policy.
-Not -all contributors agree with the content of
the protest-
Not all contributors approve of the form of
protest.
BUT, they all believe that dissent should not be suppressed
by closed-meeting administrative action of draft boards.
DO YoU?

AERONAUTICAL ENGINEERS - ASTRONAUTICAL
ENGINEERS - ENGINEERING MECHANICS
METALLURGICAL ENGINEERS - MECHANICA L ENGINEERS
NORTHROP NORAIR
in Southern California
Will conduct on campus interviews
February 9th, 1966
for candidates receiving a BS, MS, or PhD in any of the above disciplines.
Norair is involved in virtually every aspect of manned aircraft, spacecraft, and missile design, research,
and development. Major programs and significant projects in which Norair engineers and scientists are
engaged have been highlighted below to suggest areas in which meaningful careers in many space age
disciplines can be pursued.

I

T-38 Program:
F-5A/B Program:

LFC Program:
M-2 and HL-10
Lifting Body Program:
R & D Projects:

Norair's supersonic T-38 trainer is in production for the Air Training Command ...
over 500 delivered ... firm orders for several hundred more ...was first super-
sonic aircraft to complete all flight tests without a major accident ... set four world
records... has held USAF safety record for three consecutive years... an excep-
tional aircraft design, building a great record for Norair people.
The F-5 is a multipurpose supersonic fighter specifically designed for limited war
operations...can take off and land on unimproved runways... has versatile
armament configurations for many tactical missions.... and is currently in production
for several foreign nations under our government's military assistance program.
Norair designed and built two X-21 aircraft to demonstrate the soundness of its
laminar flow control concepts... tests at Edwards AFB have validated Norair's LFC
principles... further development is expected to provide increased range, payload,
and flight endurance compared with conventional aircraft.
Under contract to NASA, Norair has delivered the first two manned lifting body
vehicles designed for test and research projects in the art of returning space vehicles
to earth .. . other programs to solve hypersonic reentry problems are also being
conducted.
Continuing Norair projects include development of V/STOL, Mach 2 close support
fighter, and lightweight tactical missile designs...development of terminal aid
simulators for tactical missile research :.. titanium hot-forming research for super-
sonic aircraft applications... many aeronautical research projects involving use of
Nrir' (anal c .ri+ suersonic-hvnersnnic wind tunnAl

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