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January 30, 1966 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-30
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY SO., 1999

SUNDAY, JANUARY 30,1966

Junior Women's Apartment PermIssion

0 ,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, JANUARY 30, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

February 9, 1965 will long be
remembered as the date of eman-
cipation for the thousands of jun-
ior women here at the University.
For it was on that fateful day
that the passage of Junior Wom-
en's Apartment Privileges was an-
nounced. The passage of this
measure has opened up an entire
new sphere in the concept of
women's housing responsibility
and independence. Up until this
time, only women twenty one or
older or those that were seniors
were allowed to live in apart-
ments. This put what sometimes
seemed to be an unbearable bur-;

den on the girls who were forced
to spend their third torturesome
year within the confines of the
dormitory walls. As many upper-
class women comment, "Freshman
year is great no matter how bad
the food or living conditions may
be. Just the excitement of being
at college seems to overshadow
everything else. However, as the
glamor of being away from home
subsides, the pressure and desire
to escape the dorm system in-
creases." This has especially been
true within the past few years as
the dorm system has remained
static in expansion while the stu-

dent enrollment has rapidly and
steadily increased. Because of this
pressing room shortage, and the
strong student support for apart-
ment privileges the possibility of
changing the past ruling was con-
templated and a final course of
action was decided upon.
The final implementation of
these apartment privileges, how-
ever, were to be contingent on
various factors. These included
the completion of several forms
which serve as protection for not
only the individual's interests, but
those of the independent realtor
as well. First, and of primary im-

portance is the Parental Permis-
sion Form which must be signed by
the parents of any junior wishing
to leave the dormitory system.
Since most junior women are un-
der twenty one their parents are
still responsible for their activi-
ties and well being, therefore the
Parental Permission Form serves
as a safeguard to ensure that par-
ents are aware and understand
the implications and responsibil-
ity apartment living presents. The
second form is a cancellation of-
ficially notifying the University of
an individuals withdrawal from
the residence hall system. Lastly

there is the University Rental
Agreement. In all cases this form
serves as a means of cooperation
between the individual realtors
and the University through the
offices of Student Activities and
Off Campus Housing. According
to the agreement, the University
acts as a mediator in case of any
conflicts which might arise be-
tween the two parties. In case of
nonpayment of rent, the Univer-
sity often assures that back pay-
ments are met by the withholding
of grades. Because of this type of
agreement many realtors do not
feel the necessity for parents co-
signing leases even the the in-
dividual girls are under age.
Another of the stipulations re-
sulting from the approval of these
privileges was that women under
twenty one must live in housing
approved by the University. How-
ever, the apartment rights were
also restricted to only those build-
ings which were already com-
pleted in order to ensure that
the individuals didn't get stranded
in case the proposed dwelling
wasn't completed on time.

lh _--- - ~i

APARTMENT

S

GALORE

NEW AND OLD BUILDINGS
FALL RENTALS

Apartments offer many outlets for creative talents, such as cooking. For those untalented souls there are
always hungry girls or a wide variety of "do-it-yourself" cookbooks.

213 E. Washington
212 E. Huron

409 E. Kingsley
415 E. Lawrence
552 Monroe
718 Monroe
808 Tappan
825 Tappan
808 Oakland
816 Hill
NO 5-9405

912 Oakland
1015 Church
1009 Church
1 106 Oakland
1110 Oakland
1611 State
1223 Hill
607 H ill,
408-410 Hill

315 Catherine
820 McKinley
824 McKinley

SOME SUMMER
SUBLETS
AVAILABLE-

Looking back now in retrospect,
almost one year later, it is neces-
sary to examine the repercussions
and general effect on college liv-
ing the ruling has caused. In or-
der to obtain a comprehensive
picture of the effects it has had,
the other modes of living available
to junior women must be examin-
ed-namely the dormitory and
sorority systems.
Until the new ruling, these were
the only two possibilities open to
junior women. If they wished to
get out of the dormitory system
before they were a senior, the
only way they could do so was
by joining a sorority. Besides being
an escape from the dorm, the
sorority house presented many ap-
pealing advantages. Primarily it
represented a smaller, more close-
ly knit living unit where an in-
dividual could feel more at home
than amongst the seeming multi-
tude housed in the dorm. The

415-417 Benjamin
PATRICK J. PULTE

APARTM]
LIFE
IN
ANN APt

214 East Huron

1

AIPARTML 1EN TS ILIIMITIE ID

Among the advantages of apartment life are privacy and quiet, although exceptions have
been known to occur. Apartments are especially noted for their social advantages, such as
co-educational studying.

THE PARK PLAZA, 1320 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

Although there are only a few openings left in the Park Plaza, APARTMENTS LIMITED still has openings in such conven
iently located buildings as The Park Place (1016 Oakland), The Forest Plaza (933 Forest), The Tappan Plaza~ (848 Tappan),
The Monroe Plaza (608 Monroe), The Wilmot Plaza (1337 Wilmot), and The Park Forest (911 Forest)

All locations offer the elegance of wall-to-wall carpeting, the luxury 'of built-in air-conditioning, the eye-catching

I F '- ,

beauty of professionally designedinteriprs, and the conrenience of the

st modern

appliances. All hallways

,x

are carpet-

a In. a~ puAjI ngs Omer-unIUeI(cover 011 street *parwing.

APARTMENTS LTD.
610 S. Forest 663-0511

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