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January 30, 1966 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-30

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" S!U AY, "JA'NUARY 30, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

gYINnAY. JANUARY 20. 1966 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

gers

Survive

Scare

To

Nip

Badgers

By RICK STERN
Special To The Daily
MADISON-Gutsy Oliver Dar-
den, shoveling 20-footers into the
bucket like an undertaker, dug
stubborn Wisconsin's grave here
yesterday, then buried the Bad-
gers himself as he propelled
Michigan's Wolverines to their
tightest victory of the season,
a 69-67 thriller.
The victory was the fifth with-
out a loss for the first place Blue,
and the 19th in their last 20 Big
Ten games.
Michigan went into the contest
averaging89.7 points per game but
cold shooting combined with a
fantastic Wisconsin rebounding
effort resultedin a low scoring
struggle which wasn't decided un-
til the final second of play.
* Michigan Trails Early
Wisconsin led briefly at the out-
set, but after the first five min-
utes of play, Michigan never
trailed.
The Wolverines saw an early 11
point margin whittled down to
four by the halftime, and even
further thereafter as Ken Gus-
Il ini Tickets
Tickets go on sale tomorrow
for the Illinois basketball game.
511 E. Hoover is the Athletic
Ticket Office and the office
opens at 8 a.m. The Illini have
only lost once in Big Ten play
and are third in the conference.
Game time is 8 p.m. Tuesday.
tafon's hot hand gave Wisconsin
a 51-51 tie with ten minutes re-
maining
With 3:47 left the Wolverine
lead was 61-59 and it was at this
point that 6'7" Darden took the
reigns, scoring six of Michigan's
last eight points. First, his long
jump shot made it 63-59.
Oh '0'
'T'en seconds later the lead was
down to two again but once agair
Darden's aim was sharp, this time
on a cord-rippling set shot fron
22 feet. .i
Up 66-63 with the ball and the
clock both on their side the Wol-
verines went into their most suc-
cessful stalling effort of the sea
-son, holding the Spaulding citrus

for 90 crucial seconds.1
When they finally took a shot
it was with 0:46 showing on the1
clock. And it was Darden again,
smashing in a lay-up and getting
fouled in the process.
Beat the Clock
The three Darden shots virtually
clinched the victory. Wisconsin
had enough time for two more
baskets but not three.
With seven seconds left and the
score 68-67, John Clawson sunk
the first of a one on one free
throw situation. The second was
no good but the Badgers' Mike
Carlin only had time to frantically
dribble the ball into the Wiscon-
sin half of the court before the
buzzer sounded.
Said Wisconsin's Johnny Erick-
son after the game, "I didn't even.
think Darden was going to shoot

those shots, let alone make them.
Michigan is a spunky, courageousl
team. I looked at Dave (Strack)I
sitting on the bench and he didn't
even flinch."
Darden gave his version in the
plane on the way home. "I had
the shots and I thought I could
hit 'em. They were good percent-
age shots and I was open. The
pressure gets to you but when you
have been playing for as long as
I have, there is no reason to
succumb to it. It shouldn't interfer
with your shooting."
Darden, hitting just over fifty
per cent of his 17 shots, was the
only Wolverine anywhere near the
fifty mark. For the most part, the
Blue were as cold as the fifteen
below zero Madison weather.
In the second half Darden put
in six of nine field goal attempts,

while the rest of the team was
hitting four of 25 for a not-so-
torrid 16 per cent.
A fellow by the name of Russell,
after hitting six of nine in the
first half, made only one of 12
shots in the last 20 minutes,
though putting through 5 clutch
free throws to finish with 21
points, three more than Darden.

Jim Myers with 11 and John
Clawson with 10 carried what re-
mained of the Michigan attack.
Wisconsin's lift in the game
was provided by a pair of jump-
ing forwards, Joe Franklin and
Ken Barnes, who combined for
25 rebounds. Overall the Badgers
outrebounded their taller invad-
ers by a 55-43 margin.

Michigan Coach Dave Strack
pointed to Wisconsin's rebounding
attack as the significant factor
in the game. "They rebounded
much better than we had antici-
pated. They fought like hell and
went at the boards with a fren-
zy."
Scoring-wise, the Badgers re-
ceived a 14 point first half ef-

Track Season Opens at MU

By BOB McFARLAND vision earlier in the day, perform-
Special To The Daily ed well against a hoard of compet-
itors. Appearing in their first col-
KALAMAZOO - The Wolverine legiate meet, the frosh managed
cindermen were not in peak con- to take four first places - each
dition yesterday as they encoun- winning mark breaking a novice
tered tough competition in the record for the Western Michigan
Western Michigan Open, but they Open.

put on a respectable showing by
winning two first places.
Colleges represented at the meett
included Loyola, Northwestern,t
Notre Dame, Western Michigan,E
Eastern Michigan, Central Mich-
igan, Bowling Green and Cornell
College. The Southern California 1
Striders also had two competitorsf
entered in the meet. No pointz
totals were kept.
Notre Dame's Bill Hurd astound-t
ed the crowd with a tremendous
performance in the 60-yard dash.
Running far ahead of Michigan's
Carl Ward who placed second,
Hurd snapped the fieldhouse and
meet records in the time of six
seconds flat. The sophomore, who
ran a 6.1 sixty earlier in the day,
turned in one of the country's top
times this year with his sensa-
tional mark. Willie Brown, a Mich-
igan senior, finished behind Ward.
Strong Shot Men
The Wolverines' greatest success
of the evening came in the shot
put as Michigan cindermen took
four of the first five places. The
quartetuwas led byaJack Harvey
who pushed the ball 55' /". He
was followed by Steve Leuchtman
in second, Paul D'Eramo in fourth
and Bob Thomas in fifth.
Roy Woodton appeared to be
back in his top form of two years
ago as he cracked the meet record
in the high hurdles with a 7.4
second performance. A Wolverine
sophomore, Woody Fox, placed
third.

Shot-putter Bob Johnson heav-
ed the iron ball 49'11%", more
than three and a half feet far-
ther than his closestcompetitor
and better the old mark by 3'9".
Also cracking a frosh record, Gary
Knickerbocker cleared the bar at
6'6" to take the high jump. The
600-yard run was won by fresh-
man Ron Kutchinski in the record
time of 1:12.4.
2. Turchek (Un); 3. Canamare (M);
4. Seeley (WMU). Height-i5' (win-
ner determined by least number of
attempts; new meet record).
BROAD JUMP-1. Holland (Un);
2. Norris (M); 3. Rochow (CMU).
Distance-24'2x/2".
SHOT PUT-1. Harvey (M); 2.
Leuchtman (M); 3. Witteman (L).
Distance-55' "1.
60-YD. HIGH HURDLES-1. Wood-
ton (M); 2. Lemon (WMU); 3. Fox
(M). Time-:07.4 (new meet rec-
ord).
SHUTTLE HURDLE RELAY - 1.
Western Michigan (Mizinski, Strat-
ton, LeMan, Leek); 2. Central Mich-
igan; 3. Notre Dame (new meet
record).
MILE RUN-1. Nelson (WMU); 2.
Drennan (DTC); 3. Frost (WMU).
Time-4:15.4.
34-MILE RUN1. Coffey (ND); 2.
Pack (WMU); 3. Kelly (M). Time
--3:20.9 (new meet record).

60-YD. DASH-1. Hurd (ND); 2.
Ward (M); 3. Brown (M). Time-
:06.
600-YD. RUN-1. Mason (HTC); 2.
Bernard (AATC); 3. Vondrasek
(CMU). Time-1:11.3 (new meet rec-
ord).
300-YD. DASH-1. Williams (BG)
and Grasley (HTC) tie; 2. Gottlieb
(WMU). Time-:31.4 (new meet rec-
ord).
1000-YD. RUN-1. Dean (ND); 2.
Farrel (ND); 3. Morales (M). Time
-2:09.2 (new meet record).
880-YD .RUN r-1. Stephenson
(WMU); 2. Kearney (M); 3. Vick-
ers (HTC). Time-1:54.9 (new meet
record).
TWO-MILE RUN - 1. Mazilla
(WMU); 2. Jaeger(DTC); 3. Bish-
op (Un). Time-9:10.1 (new meet
record).
60-YD. LOW HURDLES - 1. Le-
Mon (WMU); 2. Smith (CMU); 3.
Woodton (M). Time-:06.9 (new
meet record).
HIGH JUMP-1. Broderick (ND);
2. Jim Littlejohn (Un) and Alonzo
Littlejohn (Un) tie. Distance -
6'8" (tied meet record).
ONE MILE RELAY-1. Ann Ar-
bor Track Club (Askew, Burnley,
Wade, Bernard). 2. Huron Track
Club. 3. Michigan. Time--3:9.6.
TV RENTALS
LOWEST RATES
STUDENT SPECIALS
HI F STUDIO
1319 S. Univ. NO 3-7242

fort from Dennis Sweeney, a 6'1" performance. "Gee, did we scrap
guard who could probably play in there! I've never been prouder
for University High and not look of a team. We gave our finest
out of place. effort and did everything but
In the second half it was an- win.
other basketball mutant who car- Trailing early in the game 24-
ried the Badgers. Ken Gustafson 16, Erickson called a time out and
who wears horn-rimmed glasses changed his defense, deciding to
and might major in library sci- alternate between man-to-man
ence, hit on tons of driving lay- and zone strategy. Whenever Wis-
ups and scored 15 points while consin scored a basket, they
doing it. would drop back into a "one three
$Twice within a minute, Wiscon- one" zone. At other times they
sin gained a tie, first at 47.47 used the strict man to man.
and then at 51-51 and both times MICHIGAN
it was Gustafson's hustling drive G F R P T
shots that brought the Badgers Darden f 9 0-1 8 3 18
Clawson f 4 2-4 8 4 10
back. Myers e 5 1-1 I6 2 11
Badger Coach Erickson coin- Russell g 7 7- 9 1 21
bined strategy with exhortation Bankey g 1 1-1 2 0 3
and nearly made both work for Thompson 1 1-2 3 3
him. The generally soft-spoken Totals 2813-1869 15 69
court professor was up off the WISCONSIN
bench nearly every time his team G F R P T
had the ball, kneeling at the side Franklin f 5 3-6 13 4 13
Gustafson f 7 4-4 2 3 18
of the court and clenching his Zubor c 1 0-0 8 0 2
fist. Carlin g 2 1-1 5 5 5
Erickson appeared frustrated Barnes g 4 0-1 1 2 8
after the game, but was none- Sweeney 7 3-3 6 3 17
theless enthused by his team's Totals 28 11-15 55 iS 67,
THE STRAIGHT STUFF
THAT'S WHAT YOU'LL GET MONDAY
THROUGH THURSDAY AT 11:15 P.M.
When WALLY GABLER
and STAN KEMP
REPORT THE LATEST SPORT S-
PRESENTED BY TICE'S MENSWEAR
WCBN-650
NOW SERVING UNIVERSITY TO}WERS

I \

OLIVER DARDEN PUTS IN Michigan's win clinching basket, a
lay-up with 46 seconds left against Wisconsin. Darden's clutch
shot gave Michigan a five point lead which was too big for a
determined Badger comeback. The final score was 69-67. Wis-
ncnsin's Ken Gustafsnn tries in vain to stow Darden.

CVlllll5 irken "UbL'Qzibull 1XIC3 111 va

BIG TEN ROUNDUP:
Spartans Roll Over

Distance Man
Dean of Notre Dame put on a
tremendous effort in the 1000-yard
run, tearing off a 1:52 half mile
enroute to a 2:09.2 meet record.
Michigan freshmen provided
W ildca s some of the highlights of the
meet, competing unattached in the
open divisions. Tom Kearne,
half to take a 44-30 lead and fin- Wolverine freshman, roared from
ished with 37 of 74. Purdue got a behind to a second place finish
miserable 24 of 81 from the field in the half mile run. Kearney's
I. ..,3nn nn _im.: 1:,ti 155.9 bettered the nld meet

By The Associated Press
EVANSTON - Flashing a bal-
anced scoring attack, Michigan
State took command in the first
half and rolled to a 77-68 Big Ten
basketball victory over Northwest-
ern last night.
The triumph was the fifth in
six conference games for the Spar-
tans who still trail undefeated
Michigan by one-half game.
Aitch to the Attack
Matt' Aitch spearheaded MSU's
attack In the early going and had
18 points before fouling out with
7:11 to play.'
MSU scoring honors, however,,
went to Stan Washington with 22
and Northwestern's Jim Burns also
had 22.
The loss was the fourth in five
conference ,games for North-
western.
Gophers Swamp Purdue
LAFAYETTE - Minnesota
caught Purdue cold and shot 50
per cent over the Boilermakers'
zone defense to win 91-75 in a
Big Ten basketball game yester-
day.
Purdue hit only one of its first
12 shots and never got close except
for a 23-23 threat with 7:26 to
play in the first half.
Dave Schellhase of Purdue, the

nation's leading scorer, dropped
only six of 20 from the field but
hit 16 of 17 free throws for a game
high total of 28 points, compared
with his average of 32.1.
Clark Paces Offense
Archie Clark hit 10 of 13 and
seven of nine to lead the Gophers
with 27 points, and outside shoot-
er Wes Martins connected on nine
of 11 for 18. Lou Hudson, still
hampered by a cast on his in-
jured arm, added 10.
Minnesota connected on 55.3
per cent of its shots in the first

i

but made 27 of 30 free throws. 1,U
The Gophers had a 63-43 edge record but was a second behind
in rebounds, Dennis Dvoracek the time of WMU's Stephenson.
leading with 17. In the pole vault, five men went
The victory pulled Minnesota over the bar at 15 feet but all
even in the Big Ten at 2-2. Pur- failed to top 15'6". The places
due dropped to 1-4 in the con- were awarded on the fewest num-
ference. ber of misses. George Canamare,
* * *the Michigan captain, tied for
OSU Outshoots Texans third in the event.
OSU More Medal Winners
COLUMBUS-Ohio State even- O t h e r Wolverine cindermen
ed its season record at 7-7 yester- earning medals were Brian Kelly
dy itsdeangerdadi7-7eStr-with a third place in the three-
day by defeating the Hardin-Sim- quarter mile and Elmer Morales
mons Cowboys 72-64 in a non- with a third in the 1000-yard run.
conference game.s The Michigan freshmen, run-
Rh n Sepic sank 26 points to lead ning unattached in the novice di-
the Buckeyes while teammate Bill ________unattachedinthenovicedi

ir

F-

I

Big Ten Standings
W L Pet.
MICHIGAN 5 0 1.000
Michigan State 5 1 .867
Illinois 3 1 .750
Iowa 3 2 .600
Minnesota 2 2 .500
Wisconsin 1 3 .250
Ohio State 1 3 .250
Indiana 1 3 .250
Northwestern 1 4 .200
Purdue 1 4 .200
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Michigan 69, Wisconsin 67
Minnesota 91, Purdue 75
Michigan State 77,
Northwester 68
Ohio State 72,
Hardin-Simmons 64

l

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February 16-17

Hosket picked 23 of Ohio State's
rebounds off the boards.
The Cowboys, now 12-5 for the
season, hung on throughout the
ragged see-saw game, but lack of
depth and personal fouls made the
difference.
Dearth of Help
The Texans had only nine men
on the bench, and with 6:44 left
in the game, had lost lthree to
fouls. Dick Nagy and Charlie Dish-
man finished for the Cowboys
with four personals each.
The Cowboys racked up 27 per-
sonal fouls while the Bucks had 16. 4

SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Duke 84, N. Carolina State 77
Louisville 103, Bradley 71
Loyola (Chi) 76, Kansas State 70
Clemson 71, Maryland 66
Kentucky 115, Auburn 78
Dayton 79, St. Joseph's (Pa) 76
Michigan State 77, Northwestern 68
Providence 80, Niagara 67
Iowa State 69, Oklahoma State 56
Vanderbilt 98, Louisiana State 66
Wichita 87, Tulsa 72
NBA
Cincinnati 116, St. Louis 115
Boston 119, New York 107
NHL
Detroit 4, chicago 4 (tie)

UNIVERSITY STUDENT, STAFF & FACULTY
30-Day Group Flight to Europe
JET DEPARTS NEW YORK JULY 18th
JET RETURNS FROM LONDON AUG. 15th
CallLes. Thurston Call Fred Cohen
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