100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1966 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 6, 1966

PAESI ~l IHIA DIYTHRDAJNURa 16

Rhodesi
By The Associated Press
SALISBURY, Rhodesia-Prime
Minister Ian Smith is still run-
ning one of the most prosperous-
looking countries in Africa, two
months after declaring Rhodesia's
independence from Britain.
Few countries have had so many
economic obstacles dropped in
their paths. Rhodesia's oil im-
ports have been embargoed, its
foreign assets seized, its trade out-
lets blocked and its currency
spurned abroad.
Its best customers, Britain and
Zambia, have turned against Rho-
desia and the whole world has
withheld diplomatic recognition.
Zambia in the Middle
With Zambia trying to join the

iProspers Despite Boycott
general boycott and still use Rho- Stores were stocked to the ceil- beer from Germany, Holland and
desia's coal for its rich copper ings with Christmas goods and al- Denmark as well as local brews
mines and operate a joint rail though one woman complained she on sale.
system, airline and power station could not find the right tint of They will not last forever, but
at Kariba, the situation along the mascara, all the French perfumes nobody is hurting in Rhodesia at
Zambezi River is an economist's are available along with expen- the moment. It likely will be sev-
nightmare. sive English soaps and foreign eral months before import re-
The oil embargo brought gaso- cosmetics. strictions begin to be bothersome.
line rationing for Rhodesia and Food is plentiful and cheap. By that time Rhodesia may
cut off Zambia's supply through Rhodesia can hardly be touched in have reached some kind of modus
the breakaway colony. this department except for some viviendi with Mozambique and
But Salisbury's streets are still exotic dishes. There are still im- South Africa, where luxuries are
jammed with autos. Despite ra- ported cheeses, smoked Scotch still abundant for those who can
tioning cars stream in and out of salmon, caviar and plenty of sea- afford them.
the city at rush hours. food from Mozambique and South Unemployment for Africans
Business Still Good Africa. This is high summer in Rho-
Exclusion from the sterling bloc Several Months Left desia and Salisbury's many swim-
has caused annoying currency reg- The better restaurants are serv- ming pools, tennis courts, cricket
ulations, but business is still brisk, ing French, Portuguese, German pitches and lush gardens are alive
retailers report. and South African wines. There is with pleasure seekers.
But, unemployment is almost:
in vfhn 7h n hn nn n i n i

1

discont re-od, inc.

300 S.

STATE ST.

(corner of Liberty)

ANNOUNCES THE OPENING OF
A SECOND LOCATION
ON CAMPUS
1235 S. UNIVERSITY
(in the University Towers)

Office of University Relations
Seeks Public Good Will for U'
By JENNIFER RHEA stature, depends on more than its responsibilities for education
state support. This 'vital margin' research, and service, must have
Our job (at the Office of Uni- comes from private sources-from resources and freedom."
versity Relations) is to help the alumni and friends, from business Radock emphasized that it i
people in the University commu- and industry, from government necessary to educate the public to
nity to do their job, and to make and foundations." understand and tolerate the free-
sure that the climate is as con- "Part of the assignment of Uni- dom, required for the student to
ducive~as possible for them to car- versity relations," he explained, ;learn and for the truth to be
ry on their educational mission,"yh sought without restriction.
Vice-President for University Re- ,is to convey to the publics thesogtwhutrticon
lation-PsielRforcn mrsine- nature of this institution so that Interpreting the nature and the
lations Michael Radock mai-. it is not undermined because of needs of a free uiniversity to those
His office thus has the problem ignorance, so that it is supported publics on which it depends is
of nswrin th nmerus ettrsbecause of understanding. The, according to Radock a challenging
the niveringth numreiuslet er University, to continue to meet assignment.
alumni and anxious citizens com-
plaining about the recent Viet
Nam demonstrations.
According to Radock, his office
tries to reply to all sincere com-
munications by expressing appre-
ciation for their concern and by
explaining what the University is,
that all of the students are not
involved in these activities, that
the University is assuming a neu-
tral position in current events. a'u-
Two Broad Functions
This job and others fall to the
office because of its broad func-
tions: to provide various servicesQ
to members of the University, and
to maintain the University's rela-
tions with the public.
The first includes giving direct
service tosindividuals, faculty and
staff, and academic and research
centers of the University. Editorial
and graphic assistance, publica-
tion, public relations counselling,
Internal communication ,and par-
ticipation in broad administrative
and future planning activities are
some of the endeavors undertaken
in rendering this service. I
Public Relations
Second, Radock's office. is in-
volved in the presentation and in- "
terpretation of the University to
its several publics. I
This involves the preparation
and release of news and back-
ground material to media; assist-
ance to news media representa-
tives seeking information; radio
and television production; and es-
tablishing and maintaining good
relations with the alumni, busi-
ness and labor organizations, oth-
er educational institutions, the lo- * "',
cal community and the interna-
tional community. Ti Knock on the Do
To maintain and generate the -
level of support this institution
requires, Radock believes that "the
various publics must understand
and appreciate the unique nature
of the University."
As an example, it was pointed
out that although the University is
a state school, only about a third
of its financial support comes
fro, state appropriations. How-
ever, this is the most important
fraction, because it provides the
basic support for instructional
purposes, for faculty and staff sal-
aries, instructional equipment, and
a myriad of other items. -0 5 5 '
"It must be recognized," Radock7
contends, "that Michigan's excel-
lence as an educational institu-
tion of national and international

i nevitabie wnen the economy de-
clines and the worst sufferers will
be the Africans, whose future is
the cause of the conflict between:I
Britain and Rhodesia.
They have no cushion to fall
back on, yet efforts to rouse them
to protest have been almost com-
pletely unsuccessful. Whatever or-
Sganization they had was complete-
ly neutralized by the Smith gov-
ernment's detention of their lead-
ers and agitators.
- British hopes that some opposi-
tion to Smith would form around!
the queen's representative here,
Gov. Sir Humphrey Gibbs, seem
I destined to dissillusionment. Sir
Humphrey, still holding out in
, Government House, undoubtedly
g has some supporters, but there is
9,no real thi'eat to Smith's position.

SALE!

- 3 DAYS ONLY

-SALE!

v

THURSDAY--FRIDAY-SATURDAY

ALL DGG and ARCHIVE $35

mono
or
stereo

ALL FOLK MUSIC

including Folkways,
Vanguard, Elektra,
prestige-anything
in folk music!

Were
3.79

$

39

Were
4.79

$

99

Were
5.79

$ 359
mono
or
stereo

ALL NONESUCH

X174

ALSO-SEE WHAT $1.98 WILL BUY!

We have thousands of folk,

jazz,

pop, and

classical records at only $1.98.
MUSIC LIT. STUDENTS, ESPECIALLY, TAKE NOTE!

4

BOTH STORES OPEN TILL 9 P.M. MONDAY THRU FRIDAY

Sdiscount records,

300 S. State
1235 S. University

665-3679
668-9866

or

NOW

8

The Women's Athletic Association
elcomes you+&
cts to offer Winter term opportunities
I nterhouse Basketball Tournament (after rushing)
Basketball Club (starting date to be announced)
Sponsors State Sportsday February 22nd
Gymnastics Club Tuesday evenings 7 p.m. Barbour
Karate Group Organizational meetings 7 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 11 & 18
Barbour
Fencing Club 7 p.m., Thursdays WAB
Rifle Club 7 p.m., Thursdays WAB
Crop and Saddle - Horseshow, March 13
Concert Dance Organization, Thursdays, 7 p.m. in Dance Studio
Concert February 25 & 26
Michifish Watershow - March 31, April 1 and 2.
CO-REC Activites
Folk and Square Dance Club Friday evenings Barbour Gym
Swimming at Women's Pool Saturdays 7-9 p.m. Sunday 3-5 p.m.
Intramural Building Fridays 7:30-10 p.m.
nd Congratulates the participants
and winners in:

t

... here s the answer to all your Record
and Phonograph iteeds ... get the picture?
.1J ~ f1 Dfl ,tiYJ4 A r r ritc..o

INTRAMURALS
Volleyball Tournament
Helen Newberry, Hunt
Swimming Meet
Collegiate Sorosis
Hinsdale & Chi Omega tie

EXTRAMURALS
Hockey Club won all matches
Speed Swim Club retained its
IntercollegiateChampionship
Golf Team won one and lost one
match.

r1

I

'II

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan