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January 28, 1966 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-28

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FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, JANUARY 28, 196~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Johnson

Sends

Broad

Plan

HIT WAR SCARE:
December Price Index Up;

To Geneva Disarmament

GENEVA Ems)-President John-
son proposed Thursday a sweep-
ing plan for nuclear disarmament,
and the Soviet Union replied by
demanding that West Germany
be barred from any Western atom-
sharing.
The Soviet demand appeared to
be the main condition for success
of the new round of the 17-nation
disarmament conference which
opened in Geneva's Palace of
Nations.
Soviet delegate Semyon K.
Tsarapkin said the main obstacle
in the negotiations was "West
Germany's effort to lay its hands
on nuclear weapons."
"It 'is up to the United States
to create conditions for general
disarmament," Tsarapkin told
newsmen after the opening ses-
sion. "Our position is unchanged."
President Johnson's proposal,
contained in a seven-point pack-
age, g e n e r a11y recapitulated
America's known attitudes on nu-

clear disarmament. The growing
threat in Southeast Asia, however,
added new urgency to the much
discussed problem.
Pope Paul VI also sent a mes-
sage to the conferees, urging them
to do their utmost to erase the
spectre of nuclear war. He pleaded
for "positive and concrete results."
Arms Reduction Necessary
"With every day that passes,
it is becoming more and more
obvious that no lasting peace can
be established until there has
been an effective, general and
controlled reduction in armament,"
the Pope said.
PresidenthJohnson's plan, pre-
sented to the conference by U.S.
delegate William C. Foster, called
for an "effort to control, and re-
duce-and ultimately eliminate-
modern engines of nuclear de-
struction."
"Even while our own nation is
engaged in necessary resistance
to aggression in Southeast Asia,

it must continue to pursue every
aveune for stable peace, both in
Viet Nam and throughout the
world," the President said.
Arms for Prestige
In addition to the previously
suggested schemes for nuclear
nonproliferation, safeguards, in-
spections and checks, the Presi-
dent proposed that nonnuclear
powers refrain from "competition
among themselves for costly weap-
ons often sought for reasons of
illusory prestige."-
It was a direct appeal to all
nations envisioning a nuclear
weapons program to divert their
energies and money elsewhere.
Tsarapkin's speech to the con-
ference contained the usual ref-
erences to "American imperialism"
well-known to delegates from pre-
vious meetings. Nevertheless, his
tone was -judged moderate and
Western delegates hoped some
sort of dialogue will be possible

l

in further sessions.
Referring before newsmen to
Tsarapkin's "distastefully familiar
remarks,' Foster said: "I hope
that this was just a routine open-
ing and that in the future we
may look forward to more con-
structive discussions."

Foster sa
halt the sp
ons does n
tations wit
Treaty OrI
and sharin
West Gerr
consultatio

RULE SECURED:
Labor Party
Parliament S

May Thr
WASHINGTON (P)-The steep-
est December climb in living costs
in 15 years was reported yesterday
and President Johnson cautioned
id America's pledge to against inflation that could cut
read of nuclear weap- the ground from under the na-
ot preclude its consul- tion's "economic miracle."
hin the North Atlantic The Labor Department said
ganization on the uses prices of food, clothing, housing,
g of nuclear weapons. transportation and medical care
mns jumped four-tenths of one per
ns__ cent last month, the biggest De-
cember rise since the Korean War.
While Johnson told Congress
in his annual economic message
that it is vital to hold down prices,
Commissioner Arthur Ross of the
G e IBureau of Labor Statistics spoke
out against war scare inflation
that could boost prices drastically.
e~Smaller War
,at"The war in Viet Nam is a
smaller war in a much larger and
ure could quickly build more productive economy," Ross
the Labor party for an said.
hile things still are in ."Nevertheless, we should not
ment's favor. minimize the dangers of price in-
nflation nor the precautions which{

aten U.S. Economy

war, contributed to the upward
pressure on prices, especially for
such staples as meat, which soared
13.5 per cent above December 1964.
Unless the war in Southeast
Asia is sharply escalated, prices in
1966 should rise not much faster
than last year, Ross said.
"What with prospective in-
creases in the labor force and
industrial capacity during 1966,
there will not be the kind of
pressure which built up during
the Korean War," he said.
But, he added, if a similar "in-

flation psychology" developed,
market speculation and hoarding
could worsen infiationary pres-
sures.
Prices Normally Stable
Consumer prices normally re-
main stable or drop slightly In
December, the assistant commis-
sioner, Arold Chase, said.
In 1950, December prices climb-
ed 1.3 per cent, largely because
many people worried that Korea
might turn into World War III
and developed an inflation psy-
chology, Ross said.

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CASUALTIES HIGH:
U.S. Launches New Offensive;
Air Strikes Hit Fuel Dump

cs
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SAIGON (P-) - Allied briefing of Montana and J. W. Fulbright
officers announced yesterday that of Arkansas, who want a contin-
105 Viet Cong were killed, 123 ued bombing lull, but rather with
captured and 195 suspects rounded all-out "hawks."j
up in a series of engagements on Vocal Group
widely separated sectors in the Clearly, there is a vocal group
first encounters of a post-truce of- in Congress and within adminis-;
fensive. tration councils favoring a major
U.S. Air Force fighter-bomber escalation of bombing-including
pilots apparently hit a fuel dump direct attacks on Hanoi and Hai-
in a raid on a Viet Cong center phong, population centers that
170 miles southwest of Saigon, have been ruled off-limits to U.S.
They said their bombs set off warplanes.
three secondary explosions that Johnson is pictured as deter-
shot flames and black smoke hun- mined to demonstrate anew Amer-
dreds of feet into the air. ican firmness in Viet Nam, but to
Men of the U.S. 1st Infantry attempt this with no more force
division unearthed a primitive than necessary in order to mini-
Communist arms factory 30 miles mize human and financial sacri-
north of Saigon. Among devices fices.
seized were seven mines modeled The President, it is learned ,is
on the American claymore. The unwilling to transform American
claymore can be aimed. It fires participation in the war into a
hundreds of steel pellets in a fan- mere holding action. Such a course
shaped charge. has been advocated by retired
Johnson Deciding Gen. James Gavin.
Meanwhile, two of the biggest Defensive Posture
problems facing President John- Johnson does not want Ameri-
son as he considers renewed bomb- can troops to assume a purely de-
ing of North Viet Nam are when fensive posture and thus surrender
to move and whether to escalate opportunities to keep the Viet
the aerial war. This was learn- Cong guerrillas off balance.
ed yesterday on high authority. The chief executive has receiv-
See Renewal ed no sign from any world capi-
Although the White House in- tal that Hanoi, Peking or the Viet
sists Johnson has yet to decide Cong is willing to talk peace. How-
whether to end the 35-day bomb- ever, sources say that even if
ing lull, all signs point to an early bombing is renewed as expected,
renewal of air strikes. all diplomatic channels used dur-
The President himself, for ex- ing the Johnson "peace offensive"
ample, is said to have no doubt in of recent weeks will be kept open
his own mind that the pause has and active.
failed to bring peace closer. At the moment, however, in-
In weighing his future course, tensive and obvious diplomatic ef-
Johnson is understood to feel that forts in the pursuit of peace are
his biggest problem at home is at a virtual standstill.
not with such influential Demo- Other Factorsj
cratic senators as Mike Mansfield It is known that Johnson is

concerned lest Hanoi may have a
misread his peace efforts as a i
sign of weakness. This concern,
in itself, presumably would be ac
factor in a presidential decision to i
resume bombing-and perhaps on t
a somewhat larger scale than be-t
fore, though short of the goals,
of the "hawk" camp.
The President hopes, too, that'
Hanoi will not interpret evidenceE
of divided opinion in Congress on
the bombing pause as indicating
the United States is tiring of thet
war and ready to pull out.
However, the President is un-
derstood to believe such a misin-
terpretation in Hanoi would be
normal because, were he, to read
of similar differences of opinion
in the North Vietnamese govern-
ment, he would be encouraged.
Viet Problems
A survey sponsored by the U.S.
diplomatic mission was reported
yesterday to show the Viet Cong
are now relying almost entirely
on conscription of men to keep
their war going. Volunteers were
said to be extremely difficult to1
obtain.
The survey by social scientists
into Viet Cong motivation and:
morale also was said to have found
that the Communists no longer
claim they have growing popular,
support in the countryside and
that the attitude of villagers has
swung against them.
The study is based on interviews
with about 500 Communist pris-
oners and defectors during 1965,,
with a detailed analysis complet-
interviewed were 39 regular North
ed on 313 of these cases. Also!
Vietnamese soldiers captured in
the South and a number of refu-.
gees from Viet Cong areas.
Therpersons carrying out the
study said they do not know how
representative it is in relation to
the overall Viet Cong movement:
and emphasized that it is impos-
sible in Viet Nam to make a con-
trolled statistical sampling. Eacht
individual interviewed was said to.
have been treated as a source of
information rather than as a sta-
tistical unit.
Intensified attacks from the air
were described, as one of the ma-
jor factors affecting morale. Both
air raids and artillery shelling
were said to be "frightening and
effective."
Raids by the eight-engine B-52
jets from Guam were reported to,
be one of the major fears of the
Communist forces now. Saturation
bombings were said to have col-
lapsed some tunnels and bunkers
where Viet Cong thought they
were safe.

HULL, England (P)-The Labor
>arty Thursday night won a cru-
ial special election here for a
House of Commons seat. The re-
ult gave a nation-wide boost to
Prime Minister Harold Wilson's
overnment.
The result gave the Labor can-
didate, Kevin McNamara, a mar-
in of 5,351 votes over his closest
ival, Conservative Toby Jessel.
t was a far higher margin than
nyone had predicted.
Laborite Dies
The election was caused by the
leath in November of Henry
Solomons, who won the seat for
Labor in the 1964 general election
by a margin of 1,181 votes. There
are about 50,000 registered voters
n the district.
In London, Wilson's prestige re-
ceived an added boost last night
in a House of Commons vote that
beat back opposition attacks on
the government's economic policy.
Shift to Labor
In the Hull contest, the percent-
age shift to Labor was the larg-
est in any special election since
Wilson became prime minister in
1964. A similar swing throughout
the country would give Labor a
heavy majority in national elec-
tions.
The victory of Labor candidatA
Kevin McNamara, 31, a law lec-
turer, boosted Wilson's majority
in Commons to four votes.
But another special election is
due for the seat held by Dame
Edith Pitt, a Conservative MP who
died yesterday. The Conservatives
are expected to hold that one, and
then Labor's majority goes back
to three votes.
As a result of the victory in

issues in a vigorous campaign
here ranged from local taxes to
Wilson's support for the U.S. po-
sition in Viet Nam. Laborites have
steadily plugged two purely do-
mestic issues-a proposed increase
in sickness benefits and measures
to protect housewives from mis-
leading sales talk and advertising.
In Washington, Britain's For-
eign Secretary Michael Stewart
said Thursday no firm decisions
have been made in the British re-
view of their defense commitments
and "we are in the middle of a
process."
British Role
Stewart and British Defense
Minister Denis Healey conferred
at length- with Secretary of State'
Dean Rusk and Secretary of De-
fense Robert S. McNamara on
what Stewart called "the provi-
sional conclusions" on Britain's'
global military role.
But, "It still remains for the
British Cabinet to reach firm
decisions," the foreign secretary
told newsmen at the conclusion
of the conference.
"We were concerned with world
problems and particularly with our
common defense problems," Ste-
wart said.
The four ministers were to-
gether virtually the whole day.
The Britons and Rusk and Mc-
Namara spent about half an hour
with President Johnson during the
afternoon and White House press
secretary Bill D. Moyers said the
visitors called to pay their respects
to the chief executive.

will be necessary to avoid it."
Johnson told labor and manage-.
ment they must not exceed White
House wage-price guideposts, and
hinted at strong federal restric-
tions if they do.
Food Prices
Food prices showed the sharpest
rise in December-up eight-tenthsI
of one per cent-but housing, fuel,
transportation and medical care
also went up. Only clothing prices
held steady.
Ross said the prospect in 1966
is for price increases at least as
high as last year, which averaged
1.7 per cent on an annual basis.
"While prices are still. more
stable in the United States than
in most other countries, neverthe-
less we experienced the sharpest
price increase in 1965 since 1958,"
Ross told a news conference.
Pressures
Ross said demands of the armed
forces, built up for the Viet Nam

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World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON - The Defense
Department sent the Selective
Service System a draft call yes-
terday for 32,900 men in March,
Selective Service said.
This was up from the February
call of 29.400 men, but still below
the 38,280 of January and 45,-
229 of December.
CHICAGO-Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr. said yesterday he wants
to avoid violence in Chicago dem-
onstrations but that civil disobed-
ience may be necessary.

MOSCOW-The U.S. Embassy
yesterdaycalled "ahrather dis-
torted version of the facts" a
Moscow radio accusation that the
embassy made no effort to free
Newcomb Mott, a young American
who died while a prisoner of the
Soviet Union.
ATLANTA, Ga. - Georgia's
House of Representatives opened
its first racially integrated ses-
sion in 58 years by refusing to
set a Negro, Julian Bond. But
the sequel is apparent harmony
and cooperation with seven other
Nnrxrn m bAn

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WASHINGTON - Following an
established pattern, critics of the
House Committee on Un-Ameri- WASHINGTON-Senators seek-
ican Activities urged yesterday ing to talk to death an effort
that it be abolished rather than to make union shop contracts per-
given more money. Then friends missible in all states urged yes-
praised the group-and, as us- terday that this bill be dropped
ualits operating funds were ap- in favor of legislation limiting thej
proved by a wide margin. right to strike.

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