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January 27, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-27

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THURSDAY, JANUARY 27, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

,,USA, AUR 7,16 H MC IA AIYP(.

A LlIUCI UL' JL 1N

Bankey Happy as Another Humphrey

CAZZIE TOO?
Chicago Gets NBA Franchise

By DAN OKRENT
One of the most ungratifying
positions to find oneself in is that
bastion of ignominy and anony-
mity, the post of the overshadow-
ed and upstaged.
Thousands of examples may be
found throughout our modern
culture. Among these, there is that
ultimate stand of fame because of
non-fame, the office of Vice Pres-
ident of the United States. Too,
one could be the assistant con-
ductor of the New York Philhar-
monic, the ill-fated predecessor of
Ringo Starr, or the associate
sports editor of The Michigan
Daily.
Or one could be Cazzie Russell's
partner in the Michigan back-
court.
Not His Fault
Like those holders of the afore-
mentioned p o s i t i o n s, Dennis
Bankey suffers not because of his
own inability and infirmities, but
because he is relegated to second
behind one whose stature of
either person or position must be
paramount. While we may shed
tears for Vice President Humphrey
because his office is inferior, we
must attribute Dennis Bankey's
relative anonymity to the person
of Cazzie Russell, hoopster extra-
ordinaire.
But Dennis doesn't mind. "I'm
more than happy just to be able
to play next to Cazzie, and I'll
always be willing to set him up for
a shot that only he could make,"
says the 6'1" Bankey, a former
Catholic All-America from Detroit.
"In fact, one of the greatest ad-
vantages to playing on a team like
Michigan's is that there is so much

I can learn from players of this
caliber."
And Dennis has made himself
learn. "There's no one who has
tried or tries harder than Den-
nis," says assistant coach and
freshman mentor Tom Jorgenson,
who played a principle role in the
recruitment and development of
the dark-haired guard. "He has
the right amounts of the desire
and toughness that make him not
only a fierce competitor, but an
excellent example to the other
players." And if there's anyone
who should know, it's Jorgenson.
Primarily a shooter in high
school (he averaged 27 ppg in his
junior and senior years at Detroit
St. Thomas), Bankey came to Ann
Arbor full of apprehension due to
the stupendous qualities and abil-
ities of the previous year's frosh,
a team that consisted of, in part,
Oliver Darden, Jim Myers, John
Clawson, John Thompson, and, of
course, Russell. On this account,
the forward - looking Jorgenson
converted Dennis' hard-driving,
high-scoring high school style to
a defense-oriented tack, if only
because of Dennis' lack of rela-
tive size. "In high school," Bankey
says, "the tallest player I'dI come
up against would be 6'5" or 6'6".
Now it's the exception if the front-
line men are shorter than this."
Only Junior
The only junior on the current
starting five, Bankey is glad he
picked Michigan out of the 15 or
20 offers he was considering while
a prepper. "I looked at the edu-
cational aspect along with that of
athletics," he declares. "I was
fairly convinced that I could get
the best education available to me
here in Ann Arbor, and this was

important. Of course, I knew that
with a team like Michigan was
likely to have it wouldn't be easy
breaking in, but I had the neces-
sary confidence."
Dennis attributes the source of
this confidence to his coach at St.
Thomas, Paul Mandziara. "He
convinced me that I could play
wherever I wanted to," Bankey
affirms, "and I guess he was right.
In this case, anyway."
Replaces Thompson
Moving in to replace senior John
Thompson when the Illinois-bred'
guard was injured in the Far West
Classic this past December, Den-
nis has started in each of Mich-
igan's Big Ten clashes, even
though Thompson is now back at
full strength. "I think that start-
ing on a team like this has been
one of the greatest thrills in my
basketball career," Dennis states,
"and I hope I'll be able to stay in
there."
Although he spent the great
part of his sophomore year rid-
ing the Wolverine bench, Dennis'
new-found status has not shaken
his nerves norhisabilities. "Sure,
I get nervous before a game," he
reveals, "but once you're in there,
caught up in the game itself, you
forget all about nerves."
Jorgenson Attests
Evidently he has done this, as
Jorgenson attests: "Dennis' tough-
ness is manifested in his coolness
on the court. I think his great
second-half showing against Min-
nesota's Archie Clark last week
is proof enough for that." In that
highly-touted match, the whole
Minnesota offense froze as hard
as the cast on Lou Hudson's arm,
except for the high-scoring Clark.
Displaying all the razzle-dazzle of
the proverbial "one-man team,"
Clark had a blistering first half,
worth 19 points of his team's total.
After replacing Thompson (who
had previously come in to replace
Dennis) in the second half, the
speedy Bankey held down both
Clark and his cronies to a miser-
able offensive, riddled with missed
shots and feeble passes.
As one of the only two juniors
in the team's first ten players
(center Craig Dil is the other),
Bankey stands a good chance to
be captain next year. And to do
this, Bankey must keep Thomp-
son on the bench. Does he think
he can do it? "Well, John is going
to have to work awfully hard to
get his job back."
Well, John?

By JIM TINDALL

Meeting in New York yesterday
the nine club owners of NBA
franchises voted unanimously to
give a franchise to Chicago effec-
tive next season.
The ramifications of this vote
are several and concern both
Michigan's All - America guard
Cazzie Russell and the Detroit
Pistons.
Detroit attempted to get the
territorial draft, which had been
abolished last year, reinstated for
next year only so that the falter-
ing Piston organization might
have first crack at signing Rus-
sell. The motion to pass this reso-
lution was tabled by the owners.
Pistons or Knicks
Either the Pistons or the New
York Knicks would have had first
crack at Russell, as it appears
that they will be the two last place
teams in the league, had Chicago
not been voted a franchise. With-
out the Chicago entry the draft
rights to the star guard would
have been decidedby a toss of a
coin.
Yesterday, however, all of this
was changed. When the Chicago
Packers were created in 1961 they
were given the first draft choice
among the college seniors so that
the team could get on its feet, and
based on this precedent it is likely
that Russell would be the first
draft choice of the yet unnamed
Chicago team. The franchise was
granted to a group headed by
Dick Klein, a Chicago suburb res-
ident and former basketball play-
er at Northwestern. Klein was in
New York last night preparing for
the final session of the owners
this afternoon and was unavail-
able for comment on any draft
preferences his team might have
should they be granted first pick.
Likely Choice
It seems likely however that
Russell, who is clicking off an
even 30 points per game, would
be on the top of their lists.
Detroit has made it quite clear
that they want Russell for their
club, and Don Butcher, their chief
talent scout, said earlier this year,

" Cazzie Russell undoubtedly has
more talent than any other col-
lege ballplayer in the country. Cer-
tainly he would be our first draft
choice, as he would be anybody's
else's.
"I have played against Oscar
Roberston and watched Cazzie
several times and I would say
right now that he is just behind
the 'Big 0' in every category."
Zollner Unavailable
Piston owner Fred Zollner was
also unavailable for comment last
night on how he felt this would
affect the Pistons next year. It is
felt by some that the only way
that the Pistons could be put on
a winning and paying basispwould
be by the aquisition of Russell,
Russell was contacted by The
Daily last night and after shout-
ing the news to his roommate he
said, "I'm inquisitive as to the
outcome. It is going to be a lot

tougher decision than a lot of
people think as to where I am go-
ing to play.
"I had heard that there was a
possibility of a franchise in Chi-
cago, but I had no idea that any-
thing was definite. There are
many things to be considered in
my decision as to where I would
like to play."
Some of these are likely to be
being close to his home, the chance
for more money, playing for a
young team, and thepossibility of
getting his own sports show on
radio or TV which he names as his
future profession.
The team will be the third that
Chicago has had in recent years.
Klein said yesterday that his team
would use the Chicago Amphithe-
ater for its games, and that his
organization expects to lose $100,-
000 in the first three years but
''would break even after that."

7

Opportunities for a Summner
of SERVICE and REWARD
U.S. and Abroad

8:00 P.M.
Jan. 28

NEWMAN CENTER
331 Thompson

-Daily--Kamalakar Rao
JUNIOR GUARD DENNIS BANKEY drives for two on a Iayup
against Indian's Vernon Payne in a game played earlier this sea-
son at Yost Fieldhouse. Bankey is the only junior presently in the
starting five having replaced John Thompson as Cazzie Russell's
backcourt partner.

-Panel will discuss how they have served
and how YOU can serve your fellow men.
SECURITY IS A
WENLEY HOUSE ESCORT

COMES BACK AFTER INJURY:
Gymnast Blanton Fights Way to Top

By CARL RAYFORD
In his senior year at Michigan,
Richard Blanton is giving the
gymnastics team over 100 per
cent.
To come back from a severe in-
jury, and become one of the stal-
warts on the varsity team requires
more than others are willing to
give. To go from there and chal-
lenge the Big Ten takes more than
many others have..
Blanton first started gymnastics
while a sophomore in high school.
He came to Michigan from Ever-
green, Colorado as the best prep
gymnast in the entire Rocky
Mountain area. And, except for
aninjur which sidelined him two
seasois go and -limited his out--
put last season, he has continued
to be an outstanding gumnast and
Los Angeles
Bops Pistons
DETROIT (P)-The Los Angeles
Lakers whipped the Detroit Pis-
tons 126-110 last night to end a
four-game losing streak in the
second half of a National Bas-
ketball Association doubleheader.
The New York Knicks finished
strong in the opener to clip the
San Francisco Warriors 115-103.
Elgin Baylor, looking like the
Baylor of Old, joined Jerry West
in providing the 1-2 punch for the
Lakers as they stretched their
Western Division lead to three
games over the idle Baltimore
Bullets.
Baylor, showing no signs of knee
trouble which had idled him ear-
lier in the season, pumped in 11
( points and grabbed eight rebounds
in the first period to shove the
Lakers on top 31-26, and they
never trailed the rest of the way.
By halftime, the Lakers led 65-
47 with West scoring 20 and Bay-
lor 19 points. Detroit came with-
in eight points twice in the third
period and within six early in the
fourth.

a standout in the Big Ten.
Blanton Sidelined
The injury that prvented Blan-
ton from performing was to his
arm. The tendon of his elbow was
ripped off at the bone. Doctors
had to drill holes in the bone to
reinsert that tendon, and restore
strength to his arm.
, Although the injury stopped him
for a while, today he works the
rings and the parallel bars on
the varsity team and is one of
Coach Newt Loken's outstanding
athletes.
"I think my biggest victory at
Michigan was in last year's re-
gionals when I placed behind a
guy (Glen Gailis) who later went
on to take the national cham-
pionship.'
Outside of gymnastics Blanton's
main interests are mountain
climbing, scuba diving and archa-
eology. "Being from Colorado, I
was around mountains and just
naturally became interested in
mountain climbing." How he man-
aged to find an interest in scuba
diving in the mountains of Colo-
rado is still a mystery.
Major Interest
"Anthropology," says Blanton,
"has always been one of my major
interests, especially the archaeol-
ogy of Central America." After
graduation Blanton intends to go
to the University ofthe Americas
In Mexico City where he shal
continue studying the archaeology
of Central, America.
Although he hopes to soon go to
Mexico City, he also regrets having
to leave Michigan, particularly
since he missed a year of eligi-
bility. The only reason for not
getting it, he guesses, is that he
participated in two meets during
that season, which in some cases
has been good for an extra season.
This season Blanton is having
no trouble with the arm. In spite
of the freedom this gives him to
go back and participate in all
events, as he did in high school,
Blanton has decided to concen-
trate on the rings and the parallel
bars. All of the gymnasts' op-
ponents this season have seen
what Blanton can do and none

of them so far have reason to
like it.
Last Week
Last week against Ohio State
he scored two firsts to show the
Buckeyes what he could do. This
season he is going after that first
place finish in the regionals with
a hungry look. Confident about
this team, he states that "this is
one of the best teams I've seen
since I have been here. Good
things are all that I can say about
them.
"The Big Ten is a tougher
league and we will have a hard
time, but I'm sure we can win
again. Everyone is enthused about
work.ing toward that goal."
Coach Newt Loken praised his
fine gymnast saying, "Rich has
been our tough luck boy with his

severe elbow injury two years ago
which laid him up for a consider-
able length of time. And as you
know, in gymnastics it takes a
period of good healthy years to
reach the top. But nevertheless
this year he has been coming
along fine with tremendous sin-
cerity, ambition and hard work
and is determined to be the best
in tne Midwest if not the nation!"

SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Cincinnati 71, St. Joseph's (Ind) 66
Valparaiso 89, Ball State 76
Temple 81, Lafayette 65
St. Bonaventure 88, Seton Hall 82
Drake 74, Iowa State 71
NBA
Los Angeles 126, Detroit 110
New York 115, San Francisco 103
NHL
Chicago 6, Montreal 2

II

I

I

JAZZ
is
COMING
Friday, Feb. 4-Hill

WELCOME
STUDENTS
Hours Open
MON.-SAT.
from 8:30-5:30
U-M Barbers
near Kresge's
and
Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

We at Wenley wish to carry on
what is fast becorning a campus

t
.

tradition

Dial 764-2799

-~-

,r

i e ss wr ew we w M

r Decorator
furnished, fully carpeted
JflV(RSITY lW R
. Now renting for Aug.
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PHONE 761-3565

L

F

RICH BLANTON

I

MEM

THIS
WEEKEND
FRIDAY
7-12:30
SAT.
1 P.M. to
1 A.M.

MICHIGAN MEN IN EUROPE

HAVE, IT MADE-

J

WHEN THEY. BUY, RENT OR LEASE
A CAR IN EUROPE FROM CTE
Write-Phone for Free Car Guide-Low Rate Student Plan
(AR- TOURS IN EUROPE, Inc.
555 Fifth Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10017 r PL 1-3550
Campus Rep. Richard Rogers, P.O. Box 112. Tel. 448-2932
CALL ANYTIME-662-5676

:<S
)-'f '
k

TERMINAL CARE
& "THE NURSES PERSONAL FEELINGS"
SEMINAR FOR NURSES & OTHER ;
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
WHEN: Thursday, January 27, 1966-7:30 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan League, Michigan Room
S. Ingalls Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PANEL:
1 STImENT NURSE VIEWPON3,T

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. ;>.;.

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