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January 27, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGANDAILT

PAETW.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 27,1966

'Drunken Angel' Lacks Polish
But Abounds with Fascination

By PAUL SAWYER
At the Cinema Guild
All in all, "The Drunken Angel"
is probably more interesting his-
torically than it is in itself. It
was made early in Kurosawa's
career (1948) well before the great
director thrust his "Rashomon" on
an unsuspecting Cannes festival.
Yet very few of the early works of
great directors are completely
without interest in their own right.
For the most part, "The Drunken
Angel" is a typical gangster melo-
drama, remarkable only in its
sentimentalism; yet flashes of the
later Kurosawa are continually
popping up throughout the film
in quite fascinating ways.
The main problem, as might be
imagined, is the screenplay, a
crude imitation of the American
gangster genre which was perhaps
typical of an early stage of cul-
tural assimilation. The p 1 o t
abounds in overheard conversa-
tions, two-dimensional characters,
and trie symbolism. The redeem-
ing element is Kinashi Shimura
in the role of a rough and tumble
Tokyo slum doctor who takes a
special interest in the moral and
physical rehabilitation of a young
tough afflicted with tuberculosis
(Toshiro Mifune).
No .chances at sentimentalizing
are missed. The old doctor, we
learn, could long ago have been
rich and prosperous but for his
honesty; moreover, he is interest-
ed in young Mifune because the

latter reminds him of his own
youth. The central symbol (if
something so obvious can be called
such) is a vast pond of sew-
age outside the doctor's office, into
which the characters are always
tossing symbolic flowers and sent-
imental tidbits. The pond repre-
sents the vila influence of environ-
ment and evil companions against
which the doctor constantly strug-
gles in his effort to save the hood-
lum.
But although most of the film
is Mifune's story, the old doctor
never ceases to arouse the greatest
interest. The venerable Shimura,
with one of the most expressive
faces in the cinema-thick, droop-
ing lips and wide, suffering eyes,
a kind of Japanese James Bald-
win-has, I must confess, always
stolen the show for me. Shimura
as the doctor is an outrageous
caricature straight from Dickens.
He stomps and rages his lonely
way through the film, insulting
and terrifying little children to
keep them from drinking out of
the pond and fearfully avoiding
emotionalism like the plague.
Cliche that he is, he never ceases
to charm, chiefly because Kuro-
sawa never loses his ironic sense
in spite of his material.
Although the later Kurosawa
turned more and more to stylized
acting and an almost ritualistical-
ly deliberate placing of events (a
result of his fusion of Western
cinematic technique with tradi-
tional Japanese dramatic forms),
the demands of "The Drunken
Angel" are for slick pacing and
a rapid, unphilosophical flow of
events. Yet this early work still
bears evidence of a kind of im-
passive intensity which is perhaps

Kurosawa's most characteristic
quality. In the fight scenes from
"Rashomon," for example, the
phynotic, Bolero-like score and
unhurried pacing convey the sense
of an almost iron deliberateness;
while the extreme close-ups and
the fiereceness of the action itself
create a tension of the highest
order.
In the climax of "The Drunken
Angel," Kurosawa demonstrates a
similar mastery of tensions which
he juxtaposes with keep pathos. As
Mifune, desperately ill of TB,
rushes into his enemy's room with
a knife, the camera remains post-
ed silently at the end of the hall
until a woman stumbles out of the
door. This long shot is followed
by a series of frantic close-ups of
the two men struggling, with their
eyes bulging and chests heaving.
In the midst of this almost un-
bearable tension, Kurosawa cuts
to the doctor walking past an open
shop. Thinking the young man is
still in bed, he picks up three eggs
and says, "For a patient."
The final scene is also typical
of the later Kurosawa. The film
as a whole is a tragedy; yet the
final shot shows the rough old
doctor skipping down the street
with a patient, a 17-year-old girl
he has just cured of tuberculosis.
The sense of sweet and resigned
sadness leaves the viewer strange-
ly moved at the end of a film so
limited in every way. Kurosawa's
talent and vision have already
grown beyond such relatively trite
material. If he was unable to lift
the film as a whole to a higher
level, at least it is far from a
complete failure.

Give Students I
To Choose Pro
(Continued from Page 1) hours
This decision is entirely up to couns
the counselor, Shaw said. Some mitte
counselors set higher standards somec
than others, he added. progra
Election Cards selor,
The student, if accepted, will The
then get perm~issioncauthorizing selors
him to sign his own election cardsThes
seln
for two of his last three semesters. seling
The student must see his coun-h
selor again only during his senior Shs
year. that t
Theoretically, the student could, an at
therefore, see his concentration and h
counselor only twice in his last if it
two and a half years. Hopel
"This plan is set up not to re- cours
duce the amount of counseling g
available but to permit counselors
who feel they can operate better Las
under this plan to change the na- ment
ture of the counseling session." It mend
also gives the student more "free- ical c
dom and responsibility to procede mend
on his own," Shaw said. Junior
Shaw emphasized that "we are to sel
not trying to get rid of students, gram
but to seek the best use of time. from<
The student is encouraged to seek passed
counseling at all times." couns
Not for All Students anyns
Shaw said he had no idea how tions.
many students would be using the Sha
program. "I don't see the day of elin
when all students should go on it asa
this program," he said. witho
"It's experimental and not the Cha
final product. After some exper- uresh
ience we may enlarge student Litera
freedom or curtail it," he said. Board
Shaw said he felt the best part the o
of the program was the statement Stude
of educational goals. He also felt receiv
it would be better if all students "We
wrote them out on the form now bestr
being sent to sophomores. form1
Drops and Adds some
For elections of more than 17 Shaw

Outside the Classroom this W

By VICKI LAS SAR
and DALE GOLD

IN TOWN
Cinema
Cinema Guild, Architecture and
Design Aud.-Kurotawa's ."The
Drunken Angel," a contemporary
study by the Japanese director,
shown with "From Inner Space," a
short with its original electronic
musical score. (7 and 9 p.m., Jan.
27 and 28.)
Antonioni's "Eclipse," with Alain
Delon, Monica Vittl and Fancisco
Rabal. (7 and 9 p.m., Jan. 29 and
30.)
Campus Theatre, South Univer-
sity-"The .Knack," with Rita
Tushinghain. (7 and 9 p.m., Jan.
27-Feb. 2.)
Michigan Theatre, East Liberty
-"Those Magnificent Men in
Flying Machines." (Through Feb.
4.)
State Theatre, State Street-
"Do Not Disturb," with Doris Day.
(Beginning Jan. 28.)
Dance
Ain Arbor Dance Theatre, Tap-
pan Jr. High School-Dance Con-
cert. (8:30 p.m., Jan. 28 and 29.)
* *
Music.
Rackham Auditorium-Concert
by Baritone. Hermann Prey. (Feb.
2.)
Radio
WUOM-FM 91.7 mc. Ann Arbor
Afternoon Musicale-Schubert:
Sonata in D major, Op. 53
Brahms: Symphony No. 4 in E
minor. (2:30 p.m., Jan. 27.)
Sibelius Festival Concert-Sym-
phony No. 7 . . . Symphony No. 5
Violin Concerto. (9:20 p.m.,
Jan. 27.)
Keyboard Artists-Artur Rubin-
stein, pianist, on his 80th birthday.
(4 p.m., Jan. 28.)
Basketball-The University vs.
Wisconsin. (4:15 p.m., Jan. 29.)
New York Philharmonic-Leon-
ard Bernstein, conducting live
from New York Sibelius: Sym-
phony No. 4 in A minor
Nielsen: Flute Concerto
Schumann: Symphony No. 4 in
D minor. (2 p.m.; Jan. 30.)
Music of the Masters, Festival
Night-Sibelius; Rakastava, Op.
14 . Lutoslawski: "Paroles
Tissee"...Bach: Concerto in
A minor . . . Bartok: Music for
Strings, Percussion, and Celesta.
(8:05 pm., Jan. 31.)
Basketball-The University vs.
Illinois. (8 p.m., Feb. 1.)
HELD
OVER
g I9
...andTRE*~

Theatre
University Players, Trueblood
Aud.-"The Days Between" by
Robert Anderson. (Feb. 2-5.)
Professional Theatre Program,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre -
American Conservatory Theatre
presents "Tartuffe," by Moliere.
(8 p.m., Jan. 27 and 28; 2:30 and
8 p.m., Jan. 29 and 30.)
* * *
OUT OF TOWN
SArt
City National Bank Office, First
National Bldg., Woodward and
Cadillac Square-Special showing
of 24 impressionist and post in-
pressionist paintings from the col-
lection of Nathan. Cummings of
Chicago. Exhibit includes works of
Braque, Daumier, Degas, Gauguin,
Kandinsky, Renoir, Manet, Monet
and others. (10-6 Mon.-Fri.; 10-5
Sat. and Sun.; Through Feb., 3.)
N o r t h l a n d Center Geodesic
Dome, Southfield, Mich. - The

Third Annual Hylozoist Arts Fes-
tival. (9-6 Mon.-Wed; 9-9 Thurs.-
Sat.; through Feb. 5.)
Dance
Detroit City Ballet, Scottish
Rite Aud., Masonic Temple-Per-
forming "Soirees Musicales" and
"Matinees Musicale" by Rossini,
arranged by Benjamin Britten.
(8:20 p.m., Jan. 29.)
* . *
Music
Detroit Symphony Orchestra-
Gordon Staples, violinist will join
the symphony for the performance
of Haydn: Symphony No. 96 in
D . . . Berg: Violin Concerto ...
Prokofiev: Symphony No. 6, Op.
111. (Jan. 27.)
D e t r oi t Symphony, Young
Peoples Concert, Ford Aud. Valter
Poole conducting Igor Stravinsky's
"The Firebird" in a ballet per-
formance staged by the Fisher

Ballet Co. (11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Fish
Jan. 29.) Gran
Detroit Symphony - Open re- Russe
hearsal; Mary Costa of the Metro- Pussy
politan Opera, soprano in concert Wa
with Sexton Ehring conducting, berry1
(2 p.m., Feb. 2.) That7
* * * 27; 2
Theatre "Th
Detroit Puppet Theatre, Detroit 28.)
Institute of Arts-Salzburg Mar- "Shi
ionette Theatre performing: Nut- p.m.,,
cracker Suite (10 and 1 p.m., Jan. "Sa
29; 10 a.m. Jan. 31.) 2 and
Snow White (3 p.m., Jan. 29; Wa
1 p.m., Jan. 31.) stelle
Magic Flute (7:30 p.m., Jan. 30.) Osbon
I
I
I
TONIGHT at 7 a
I

Chance
ograms
and late drops and adds, the
elor must be seen. Shaw ad-
d it would be possible for
one to completely change his:
am without seeing his coun-
but "he'd be a fool to do it."
e plan puts pressure on coun-
to be meaningful, Shaw said.1
tudent must leave the coun-t
office with a clear idea ofi
oals.
w said he was encouraged t
he program would be seen as
ttempt to reduce counselingt
e would be very disappointed
resulted in less counseling.
fully, closer relations with
elors will lead to more coun-t
he said.t
Recommendation
t February, Student Govern-r
Council passed a recom-
ation calling for a more rad-4
hange. SGC voted to recom-c
to the literary college thatc
rs and seniors be permitted1
ect their own academic pro-
without securing approvalx
counselors. This motion wasc
d in the belief that "the(
elors have not provided, inc
'eal sense, counseling func-
iw said he could not approve
minating counseling. "I view
a service a student cannot do
ut."
anges in counseling proced-
have to be approved by the
ry College Administrative
whiclh has voted to begin
ptional counseling program.
nts not in this program will
e regular counseling.
e don't view it as the only or.
method, simply as anotherv
that may suit the needs ofa
students and counselors,"t
added.t
?eka
her Theatre, 2nd and W.
d Blvd. - Eartha Kitt anda
11 Hype in "The Owl and thes
cat." (Through Jan. 31.) f
yne State University's Hil-g
Classic Theatre--"All's Wello
Ends Well" (8:30 p.m., Jan.
:30 p.m., Jan. 29.).
e Tempest" (8:30 p.m., Jan.
e Stoops to Conquer" (8:309
Jan. 29; 2:30 p.m., Feb. 2.)
int Joan" (8:30 p.m., Feb.
3.)
yne State University's Bon-
Theatre-"Luther" by John
ne. (Jan. 28-30 and Feb. 3.)
-------------------
nd 9 P.M.'
r
SAWA'S
u m
r
r
r r
p
r
r
r
SHOW9NP.M.
r
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ner Space

c score
J Y
E AUDITORIUM
Y CENTS
SH OW "
LME
or Godot" &
ape,
FRIDAY,
FEB. 4

Committee
Established
By Panhel
(Continued from Page 1)
sion of privacy.
However, according to both Miss
Fitch and Miss Lewis, the na-
tionals have exhibited a surpris-
ingly tolerant attitude toward the
membership committee, and al-
though most of them have come
out against it, few local chapters
were actually forbidden to vote for
the proposal.
Objections
During the past months, the
major objections to the proposal
that have come from local chap-
ters have been:
1) That the committee's action
may cause a split in Panhellenic,
and
2) It is wrong for a member of
one sorority to be in the position
of judging the actions of another
house.
Miss Fitch said that now thy
proposal must be approved by Stu-
dent Government Council as a
constitutional amendment, but she
does not anticipate any opposition.
Cornell To Try
Experimental
Ph D. Program
Collegiate Press Service F
ITHACA, N.Y.-Last year; Cor-
nell University announced that it
would institute a special program
with a highly selected group of
students who would move from
the freshman year through to a
Ph.D. in six years-cuttingdabout
three years off the traditional
course.
Last week, the school launched
a nationwide search for 40 su-
perior students to commit them-
selves to the program when they
enter Cornell next fall.
From the freshman year on, the
university's leading scholars 4ill
supervise the students who will be
freed from all formal course re-
quirements. The students will be
on full tuition scholarship plus
additional support according to
needs during, their three under-
graduate years and will get annual
$3000 fellowships for their three
graduate years.
MODERN DANCE
CONCERT V
THE ANN ARBOR
DANCE THEATRE
NOW IN ITS THIRD YEAR
FRI. and SAT.
Jan. 28 8:30 Jan. 29
TAPPAN School
(E. Stadium at Brockman)
The works. From pure dance and
structured choreography to new
concepts in "total" theatre comm-
bining movement spliced with film,
color/light projections and elec-
tronic compositions.
ALL SEATS RESERVED $2-$1.50
Parties of 10 or more, only 75c
TICKETS ON SALE AT

CENTICORE POETRY
BOX OFFICE OPENS 7:30 P.M.

NO SEATS RESERVED
Shows at 1:15-3:50-6:30-9:00
Mats. $1.25; Eves. & Sun. $1.50
Prsents g
40th Chfox
prpresent

*

COLOR BY QE %

NEXT ATTRACTION
"MY FAIR LADY"

4M

THE ENTERTAINMENT
EVENT OF THE YEAR!
METRO-GOLDWYN-MAYER PRES..'T,
A CARLO PONTI PRODICTION
DAVID LEAN'S FILM
OF BORIS PASTERNAK$
DOCIOR.
ZUBAGO

THE STRAIGHT STUFF
THAT'S WHAT YOU'LL GET MONDAY
THROUGH THURSDAY AT 11:15 P.M.
When WALLY GABLER
and STAN KEMP
REPORT THE LATEST SPORTS-
PRESENTED BY TICE'S MENSWEAR
WCBN-650
NOW SERVING UNIVERSITY TOWERS

L-

r

rc;vr MI[CHIGAN

3RD WEEK
Direct from its
Roodshow Engagement

I

T
'V

10

-j .

Today 4:10 P.M.
Arena Theatre Frieze Building
TWO ORIGINAL ONE-ACTS
JOURNEY TO QUADHANCH
by Richard Reichman
THESQUIRREL JUMPED OVER THE STUMP
by Steven Coffman
Written in the Department of English Playwriting Class
DEPARTMENT OF SPEECH
STUDENT LABORATORY THEATRE
ADMISSION FREE

AKI RA KURO.
r
1
r
[
a
[I The 4pt
1
1
1
[
FIRST ANN ARBOR
[
r
r
[
1
Short: "From Inr
Original electronic
a
1
1
r
ITIE, CH 1lL
r !IN THE ARCHITECTURE
ADMISSION: FIFT
Lmm....,......mmmu........ .

STARRING
GERALDINE CHAPLIN JULIE CHRISTIE TOMCOURTENAY
ALEC GUINNESS '-SIOBHAN McKENNA- RALPH RICHARD6ON
OMAR SHARIF ZHWVAO ROD STEIGER RITATUSHINGHAM
SCREEN PLAY BY UIRE DBY
ROBERT BOLT-DAVID LEAN PANAVSION'=MEIROCOOIR
MICHIGAN PREMIERE WED., FEB. 2,1966
"ONE OF THE FINEST PICTURES OF OUR TIME" -N. Y. Daily News
"A MOTION PICTURE EVENT"-Time Magazine
"REMARKABLE, IMPRESSIVE, MAGNIFICENT"-. Y. Pot

M

r

I

RESERVED SEATS NOW AT
EVENINGS S:30 P.M. SUN. EVES. 5:00 P.M.
MATINEES WED., SAT., SUN. W2:00 P.M.
ADMISSION PRICESI
MATS. WED. & SAT. $1.50-$2.00-x2.50
MATS. SUN. & IIOL. $2.00-$2.50-$3.0
ALL EVENINGS $.00-$2.50-3.0
Sox OFFICE OEM 12 NOON DAILY
140 BAGLEY, DETROIT 41229

SOX OFFICE OR BY MAIL.!
I Send check o m oney *lf d r ay.61to
1 UNITED ARTISTS Theatre - 140 Bagley
*Ave,, Detroit, 26. and enclose etaniped sElf
1 .ddre,,e8 .nw.Iop*.
1 NA.E. "...............f................
ADDRteSS
' eDOOF SEATS..... f.-.e ........... . 'M.O tRIO;
I DATE E QEO$TEDyuO ..ERNATE OATES...,,.....
I RESERVATIONS FROM ANY SEARS STORE OR AiO"I
D OWNTOWN-NORTIA 4.EASEUR4O OR
WESTLAND ExCEfT SAT.)

CORRECTION
MUSKET'S
WEST SIDE STORY
TICKET INFORMATION
BLOCK TICKETS: JAN. 31
INDIVIDUAL TICKETS: FEB. 1-12
TICKETS AVAILABLE:
MUSKET OFFICES, MICHIGAN LEAGUE

0

TONIGHT AT 8:000 P.M.

1

I

1 1

a

PTP

pI'e nt4

A.C.T.

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ENDS TODAY
'T HUNDERBALL'
AT 1:30-4-6:30 & 9:00

Dial 662-6264

PTP e
LATE, LATE
Samuel Beckett's
ENDGA
By Author of "Waiting f
"Krapp's Last Ti

IN

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE
PROGRAM

AMERICAN CONSERVATORY
THEATRE

STARTING &W$
FRIDAY A
HOD TatYlO
Shows at 1 :00

FRIDA,
JAN. 28
11 P.M.

"A madly whirling carnival of mirth!"
-Pittsburgh Press
"Shimmering and immensely
appealing display of style
..thundering success!"
-Pittsburgh Daily-Dispatch
"Stunningly recreated N.Y. hit!"
-Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

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