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January 26, 1966 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-26

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

"XW +1t"CT 7 ~tari :.w r .

THE MICHIC~A~ DAIlY

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, 1966

n
i

Holiway

Trades

Coaching

for

Business

h'

By BOB McFARLAND
A man can look at coaching In
a myriad of ways : it can be a
job, a hobby, a meansof keeping
in touch with a sport, a way to
make money.
Or to a few men, coaching can
become a way of life. The occu-
pation became a way of life for
Bob Hollway, Michigan defensive
line coach for the past 12 years.
But the Wolverine grid coach
signalled the close of this career
yesterday, when he affirmed re-
ports that he has accepted a posi-
tion with the Detroit firm of
Crawford-Mazer.
The decision to step out of the
coaching field wasn't an easy one,
and came only after long deliber-
ation by the Michigan mentor. "I
actually never thought about leav-
ing coaching, or ever anticipated
doing anything else," Hollway said.
"I grew up with coaching. My dad
was a coach and athletic- director
for 42 years, and I've been con-
nected with football in some way
all my life."
"I had to consider what was
best for my family and myself,"
Coach Hollway continued. "Coach-
ing is a rather vicarious occupa-
tion. I feel this new position
is a wonderful opportunity for
me .
When Hollway begins work at
his new post next week, he will be
leaving behind a rich and deep
association with the gridiron. He
played end on the 1947 Wolverine
squad that won the Rose Bowl and
conference championships, and
filled the defensive wingman slot
on the 1948 team that copped the
national and conference cham-
pionships. Closing out his career
in 1949, he served with a Michigan
eleven that tied for the confer-
ence crown.
His coaching career was no less
Impressive. After a year as Wol-
verine freshman coach, he accept-
ed the position of backfield men-
tor at Maine. He became line
coach at Eastern Michigan Uni-
versity the next season, and re-
mained there until he returned to
Michigan in 1954.
Coach Hollway developed into
an excellent defensive stratagist

and has been one of the key fac-1
tors behind Wolverine success in
this department in recent years.
A coach such as Hollway is vir-
tually impossible to replace, and
no one is more aware of that right
now than Michigan's head coach,
Bump Elliott. Speaking of Holl-
way's career, Elliott said, "In my
coaching at Michigan, first as an
assistant with Bob and later as
head coach, I always found him
extremely valuable as a member
of our staff. His presence will be
sorely missed.
"He possesses a tremendous
wealth of knowledge about the
game of football, and he always
performed all aspects of his re-
sponsibilities excellently," Elliott
praised.

"I look on Bob's departure with
mixed emotions," he added. "I
hate to see him leave, but I realize
this is an excellent opportunity
for, him. You must make the de-
cisions that are best for your f am-
ily's future," the head coach re-
flected. "I wish him the best of
everything."
Coach Hollway was first ap-
proached about the job in Novem-
ber. "I had long been acquainted
with Mr. Mazer, who is one of our
fine alumni and former president
of the University of Michigan Club
of Detroit. He told me he was ex-
panding the company and asked
me if I would be interested in a
position as manufacturer's repre-
sentative," Hollway explained.
In addition to his concerns with

the defensive line, Hollway has
been active in recruiting and has
been instrumental in bringing sev-
eral top players to Michigan over
the 12-year span. "I'm going to
hate to terminate my association
with Elliott and Oosterbaan after
all these years. I'd like to continue
to help the University and the
football team in recruiting or any
other way possible," he indicated.
The coach still plans to maintain
his residence in Ann Arbor.
Why Coach Hollway has been
so successful both as a teacher of
football and as a recruiter of
talent is very evident. His en-
thusiasm and love of thegame, of
Michigan, and of people overflow
when he discusses his coaching
career in Ann Arbor.
"I'll hate to miss the thrill of

watching a Ron Kramer leap to
catch a pass or seeing a Jim Con-
ley make a tackle," he said with
the emphasis that could only be
placed by a person who had spent
a lifetime in the game.
Hollway listed Terry Barr, Ron
Kramer, Jerry Smith, Jim Conley,
Bill Yearby, Bennie McRae, and
Tom Cecchini as some of the top
players he has coached. He cited
Smith as largely responsible for
Michigan's first place defensive
ranking in the Big Ten for 1960
and termed Conley, captain of the
1964 squad, "a fine leader and
person."
He pointed out that Michigan
was "special" to him because of
the people. "I don't think you
could find quality people like this
anywhere. The track coach, the

Strack Ready To Answer Fans
How do you coach Cazzie Russell? What do you say during
a time out?
No matter what the questions Wolverine basketball fans
may have, The Michigan Daily now offers them a unique oppor-
tunity to find the answers "directly" from head coach Dave
Strack.
Strack, the UPI coach of the year last season, has agreed to
answer queries the readers may have about all phases of the
- game.
Questions may be mailed to The Daily at 420 Maynard St.
or phoned in during the afternoon. Any matters that pertain to
particular games should be sent to The Daily within two days
after the game.
The queries will then be presented to Strack by a Daily
reporter and both the question and answer will be printed in
the paper.
Duke Retains, Lead;
Friars, Vandy Gain

basketball coach .. and on down
the line."
If Coach Hollway had the time
and memory, one had the feeling
that he would have named every
member of the student body and
faculty. He singled out two ad-
ministrators especially, Dean An-
derson of the literary college, and
f o r m e r Vice - President Roger
Heyns.
"I doubt if many people have
heard the story of what Heyns did
in the 1958 season," Hollway re-
called. "We had just been waxed
by Northwestern, 55-24, and he
came down and talked to the team
on a Sunday afternoon. He told
us to keep our chins up, and the
next Saturday, we came back with
a great 20-19 upset win over Min-
nesota. You wouldn't be able to
find another school in the coun-
try where a vice-president would
do a thing like that."j
Coach Hollway has had a hand'
in many Michigan victories over
the past 12 seasons. "Perhaps the
most satisfying of all was shutting
out Ohio State, 19-0, in 1956. That
was a ,great win from both the
players' and coaches' standpoint,"
he said.
Hollway's c o a c h i n g talents
haven't gone unnoticed in other
sections of the country over the
past decade. His name has often
been listed among the leading
candidates for openings. He at-
tributed most of this to "specula-
tion."
Rumors circulated most recently
concerning the defensive 1i n e
coach this fall. The Chicago Tri-
bune quoted Southern Illinois'
athletic director as naming Holl-
way as the prime candidate for
head coaching duties there. Holl-
way said he never received a con-
crete offer, and didn't pursue the
job.
After Tommy Prothro left Ore-
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Massachusetts 107, Colgate 77
Creighton 104,LaSalle 90
West Virginia 90, Pitt 79
Dayton 85, Los Angeles Loyola 57
W. Michigan 108, No. Illinois 88
Villanova 94, St. Peter's (NJ) 66
Alabama State 98, Florida A&M 89
Alabama 71, Mississippi State 63
NBA
Philadelphia 110, Los Angeles 106
New York 115, Detroit 10
Cincinnati 113, Boston 101
St. Louis 142, San Francisco 107
COEDS:
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DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

gon State after the 1965 Rose Bowl
game for UCLA, the Michigan
assistant was one of the top can-
didates for the Beavers' post, "I
thought I had it," Hollway stated.
"When the interview was over
they asked me to stay for two
more days." He was also a finalist
for the Washington State position
two years ago.
Handling the academic problems
of the grid players was considered
by Hollway to be one of his most
important duties with the Wolver-
ines. "I always tried to take a
genuine interest in the boys, an
interest based on something be-
sides his ability as a player. What

he is or becomes 10 years from
now means a lot to me," he con-
tinued.
"I'd just like to thank all the
people who helped me, likeFritz
Crisler and Bennie Oosterbaan.
They are the reason I've got this
opportunity.
A lot has been said about Mich-
igan tradition, but Hollway ex-
pressed it somewhat better than
ever before. "I'll tell you why
Michigan has such a great tradi-
tion. It's because tradition is made
of people."
The Michigan tradition is a good
deal richer because of a coach like

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d

BOB HOLLWAY

TWO-YEAR VET:
Lightweight Sparks Defense,

By The Associated Press
Duke and Kentucky, both idle
last week because of mid-year
examinations, continued at the
head of the class in the Associated
Press major-college basketball poll
today. Failing grades affected the
status of St. Joseph's of Penn-
sylvania, Kansas and Bradley.
St. Joseph's, upset by St. John's
of New York 82-72, dropped two
places to fifth. Kansas, sixth a
week ago, fell to ninth after losing
to Nebraska 83-75 while Bradley,
seventh last week, slipped out of
the rankings.
.Cincinnatiswhich defeated the
Peoria, Ill., Braves 85-69 replaced
them in the Top Ten, advancing
to the No. 8 position. The Bear-
cats were unranked a week ago.
Duke, 14-1, collected 28 first-
place votes and 397 points in the
latest voting, based on games
through last Saturday.
Kentucky, unbeaten in 12 games,
had 14 votes for the top spot and
390 points on a basis of 10 for
a first-place vote, 9 for second
etc. The Wildcats trailed Duke by
only three points last week.
Providence and Vanderbilt also
were not scheduled last week, but

each advanced one notch. The
Friars, 12-1, took over the No. 3
spot from St. Joseph's while the
Commodores, 14-2, moved into
fourth place.
Texas Western, the only other
undefeated team at 12-0, leaped
from eighth to sixth.
Kentucky's Wildcats, idle since
January 15 because of mid-year
examinations, swung back into
action Monday night by scoring an

1I

impressive 111-85 victory
Louisiana State.

I9 i Fi STUDIO
1319 So. University

668-7942

By DALE SIELAFF
One of the last places you'd
expect to find a 155-pound hockey
player is on defense, but, sure
enough, Michigan's number 3, Ted
Henderson, not only weighs 155,
but he's also been a regular de-
fenseman for the past two years.
In this his third season for
Michigan, Ted is playing with his
third partner. He started as a
sophomore with Roger Galipeau
on Michigan's NCAA champion-
ship team. Then last winter he
teamed with Mark Thompson, and
finally this year, he's" the senior'
member of the Henderson - Bill
Lord partnership.
How does it feel to play with
three different defensemates in as
many years, while in the pros they
Illini Tickets
Tickets for next Tuesday's
basketball game with Illinois
go on sale today at 8 a.m. at the
Athletic Administration Build-
ing, corner of Hoover and State.
As usual, student and faculty
tickets cost $1 each with a limit
of two per customer. The pur-
chaser must show one ID card
for each ticket he buys.
play together that long just for
a start?
"You don't really have to change
your style, and each man has a
pretty set technique. This year
we're both men who back up. But
on defense you've each got a job
to do, so it doesn't really make
that much difference, although
this year both Bill and. I have
about the same style, so there is
more teamwork. Bill is playing
real well as a sophomore."
Coach Al Renfrew echoed Ted's
opinion, "There's no change in
style with a switch in partners.
The first two years Ted was on the
fright, now he's on the left. He's
come a long way since he's been
here, and he's one of the steadiest
defensive men we've got."
Small But Effective
Henderson, like so many other
Canadians who've played their
college hockey in Ann Arbor, came
because someone else from his
area played here. In Ted's case,
it was Ross Childs, and All-Ameri-
can goalie Bob Gray, whom Hen-
derson played with-his sophomore
year. All three hail from Owen
Sound, Ontario.
Despite his size, Henderson has'
been a defenseman from his pee-
wee days right up through the
minors. "I find I miss the weight

a little, especially in the corner,
and in front of the net, when the
main job of the defense is to
knock the man down. But when
you only weigh 155, you can't
knock him down, so I play to hook
his stick off the ice and push him
out of the middle."
Renfrew elaborated on Ted's
value to the team. "He's a good,
clean player. He's also one of the
steadiest defensmen we've got,
along with M a r k Thompson.
That's one reason for the switch-
to get Ted and Mark out at dif-
ferent times. He's not the best
skater on the team, but he's one
of the best positional players."
An Assister
Henderson sees a defensemen's
job as "starting plays and carry-
ing the puck out of our own end.
As far as shooting and scoring, I
just don't have the shot, and I'm
not that good a stick handler. I'm

happy to let the forwards score, so
I don't get overanxious."
Ted's adherence to his philoso-
phy is readily apparent from the
fact that he is still looking for
his first goal of the year, while
picking up four assists.
Having played 15 years on de-
fense, Henderson has had his
share of tough plays, but he says
his toughest is the one all de-
fensemen have nightmares about,
the "three on one break. It's a
tough play to make. You'll find
Tech (Michigan Tech, this week's
opponent) will send two men down
to forecheck while most teams
only send one, and this increases
the possibility of the break."
Henderson feels that this year's
team, now in third place in WCHA
with the two losses to North Da-
kota, has "more cohesion and spir-
it than last year. That's probably
the most important difference."

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

Duke (28)
Kentucky (14)
Providence
Vanderbilt
St. Joseph's, Pa.
Texas Westein
Chicago Loyola
Cincinnati
Kansas
UCLA

14-1
12-0
12-1
14-2
13-3
12-0
12-1
13-2
14-3
10-4

over
39,7
390
311
293
153
152
125
85
66
60

TERMINAL CARE
& "THE NURSES PERSONAL FEELINGS"
SEMINAR FOR NURSES & OTHER
MEDICAL PERSONNEL
WHEN: Thursday, January 27, 1966-7:30 P.M.
WHERE: Michigan League, Michigan Room
S. Ingalls Street, Ann Arbor, Michigan
PANEL:
1. STUDENT NURSE VIEWPOINT
Miss Susie Meyers, Nursing Student, University Hospital
2. MEDICAL NURSES VIEWPOINT
Mrs. Daniel Burke, R.N., Former Nursing Supervisor
Clinical Research Unit, University Hospital
3. SURGICAL NURSES VIEWPOINT
Miss Margaret Colmery, R.N., Supervisor,
Surgical Service, Veteran's Hospital
4. WHERE DO WE GO FROM HERE?
Miss Barbara Horn, M.S.N.Ed., R.N.
Professor of Nursing, University of Michigan
MODERATOR: Donald V. Young, Chaplain
Episcopal Chaplaincy to the Medical Community
Sponsored by: Ecumenical Campus Ministry, and the
Episcopal Chaplaincy to the Medical Community

AA

Others receiving votes, listed al-
phabetically; Auburn, Bradley,
Brigham Young, Davidson, Dayton
(1), Houston, Michigan, Michigan
State, Nebraska, New Mexico,
Oklahoma City, San Francisco,
Stanford, Syracuse, Temple, Texas
A&M, Utah, Virginia Tech.

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