100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 26, 1966 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26, x.966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNSDA, JAUAR 26,196 THEMICIGANDAIY PAE Tl__
/

i Fi1A i/ i iVLY

4

Johnson Holds

aslk
Air Tragedy
'Kills 46 G..'s
In Viet Nam
w Plane Crashes into
Mountain Leaving No
Known Survivors
SAIGON WIP-The worst Ameri-
can crash of the war within Viet
Nam marred a shifting of troops
Syesterday for drives intended to
root elusive Communists bands
from their hideouts.
Forty-six U.S. servicemen died
in the crackup, fire and explosions
,that shattered a twin-engine 0123
transport, on a rain-veiled hillside
in the central highlands. Impact
Sand heat combined to set off
mortar shells carried as cargo and
then personal ammunition-car-
tridges and grenades.
Victims of the air crash were
42 troopers of the U.S. 7th Ca-
valry, Airmobile, Regiment and the
transport's four-mian crew, from
the 315th Air Commando Group.
A search party found none aboard
survived.
One Unit
The troopers formed one unit
of many being lined up by the
allies -- Americans, Australians,
New 7ealanders, South Koreans
and South Vietnamese-for of-
fensive probes in various areas to
regain touch with enemy forces
that generally have avoided com-
bat since the end of the lunar
new year truce Sunday.
The transport slammed into the
hillside while groping through a
driving rain five miles east of
An Khe. It had taken pff shortly
before from a field in the An Khe
staging area, headquarters of the
U.S. 1st Cavalry, Airmobile Di-
vision, 250 miles northeast of
Saigon.
Communist Attack
Though they have avoided a
major test of strength since the
end of the cease fire, the Com-
munists killed three American and
two Vietnamese with a 15-minute
mortar attack before dawn Tues-
day on the U.S. Marine base at
Da Nang. Eleven Americans and
14 Vietnamese were wounded.
Briefing officers said Viet Cong
operations through a 24-hour
period of Monday and Tuesday
encompassed only 20 minor
harassments and one act of
terrorism.
A Saigon government spokes-
man said contact has been made
with North Vietnamese regular
regiments which began operating
south of the border months ago.
Last Big Defeat
Their last big fight was with
U.S. air cavalrymen and Vietna-
mese rangers in the Ia Drang
Valley of the central highlands
last November and they pulled
away from that in defeat.
The North Vietnamese com-
manders' reluctance to tangle
again with air cavalry elements
prompted some speculation before
the lunar new year truce that the
N Hanoi regime might have ordered
them to avoid battle as a prelude
to peace talks. But senior Ameri-
can officers said this was most
unlikely.
The Ia Drang campaign taught
the North Vietnames an expensive
lesson about American firepower
and mobility. The impression
among American authorities is
that the Red regulars are merely
obeying one of the first rules of
soldiering: never seek a fight un-
less the odds favor victory.

- I

on

War

To p Level'
e
Decisions
Diplomats,
Milta Men
{:....... if i Ril
In Parley
Possibility of New
Bombings on North
Remains in Doubt
WASHINGTON () -President
Johnson conferred at the White
House last night with Democratic
and Republican leaders of Con-
gress on "several matters affecting
the national security"-Viet Nam
obviously among them.
Press Secretary Bill D. Moyers
made the announcement after the
meeting got under way at 5:30
p m. He said he would have noth-
ing further to say about it and
reported that Johnson had asked
members of Congress present to
regard the information divulged
as confidential."
In response to a question, Moy-
.'::::..L.. ers wouldn't even say that Viet
Nam was being discussed. However,
<' that was self evident-if , only
because the conferees on the ad-
ministration side included roving
Ambassador W. Averell Harriman,
just back from a round-the-world
peace mission, and Gen. Maxwell
D. Taylor, former ambassador to
Saigon who now is a presidential
$ OL) H consultant on Viet Nam.
VJE" Top Leaders
Most of the top Democratic and
Republican leaders of the Senate
and House as well as the chair-
men and ranking Republican
members of such committees as
areas on this map Foreign Relations, Armed Services
which the Saigon and Appropriations were present.
e populace.

British Plan'
Quick End
For Smith
All Races To Have 1
Representative; South
Africa Stays Neutral
By The Associated Press E
LONDON-Prime Minister Har-
old Wilson promised last night
that Africans would share in any
provisional government that suc-
ceeds the all-white minority rebel
regime in Rhodesia. He said an
interim government would be set
up in Salisbury as soon as the
white rebellion is crushed.
Wilson outlined to a packed
House of Commons, meeting for
the first time since the Christmas
holidays, his government's aims
for ending the 10-week rebellion
and bringing the colony back to
constitutional rule under Queen
Elizabeth II.
Hopes for Acceptance
The British leader said he hoped
the people of Rhodesia will accept
his program "this week, and if not,
then next week." This statement,
he said, was "a permanent in-
vitation to those in Rhodesia who
want to return to constitutional
rule."
The prime minister's statement
brought an angry outcry from op-
position Conservatives and espe-
cially from a bloc of those who
have attacked any action by Brit-
ain to bring down the rebellion.
Oil Despite Embargo
British government officials said
they found little significance in
Prime Minister Hendrik Ver-
woerd's statement in Johannes-
burg that South Africa will permit
oil supplies to be sent to Rho-
desia despite the international oil
embargo.
They noted that Verwoerd did
not offer to send any of his
country's oil supplies to -Rhodesia
and underlined that South Africa
will take no sides in the indepen-
dence crisis.
Britain's Problem
Britain's problem, as these of-
ficials see it, is to prevent pirate
oil operators from sending oil to
Rhodesia by the tankerload,
whether through South Africa by
truck or up the pipeline from
Beira in Portuguese Mozambique.
News of Verwoerd's statement
reached London as Wilson was
"spelling out in greater detail
than before" Britain's aims in
Rhodesia.
The interim government, he
said, will contain "the widest Pos-
sible spectrum of public opinion
of all races" and it will be under
the control of the representative
in Rhodesia of the queen, the
governor general.
Political Prisoners
The governor also will control
the armed forces and the police.
Political prisoners, jailed by Prime
Minister Ian Smith's white gov-
ernment, will be released as soon
as they guarantee that their poli-
tical activities will be carried out
constitutionally.
Wilson said neither Smith nor
members of his government would
have any say in preparing Rho-
desia's future. But he added that
the governor general, Sir Hum-
phrey Gibbs, was authorized to
receive proposals from Smith or
anybody else on means of ending
the rebellion.
Britain's primary aim, Wilson
said, was to end the rebellion and
"to this end it will maintain and,
as necessary, intensify economic
measures with a view to a speedy
settlement." Wilson is to announce
tougher sanctions against rebel-
lion, probably later this week.

1

WASHINGTON OP)P- President
Johnson proposed yesterday ac
broad antipoverty program for
rural America with the federal
government pledging at least $51
million the first year.
Key feature of the plan is fed-
eral aid in setting up community
development districts to tackle
such problems as health care, edu-
cation, cultural opportunities and
public services.
Administration officials said
various government departments
and agencies have at least $5 mil-
lion available for grants and as-
sistance in the fiscal year starting
July 1.
Poverty Committee
Ina special message to Con-
gress, Johnson also said he soon
will appoint a committee on rural
poverty. Its task, he said, will be
to make recommendations to him
within one year on the most ef-
ficient and promising means of
."sharing America's abundance
with those who have too often
been her forgotten people."
Officials said the development
districts, to be started on a pilot
project basis at first, might em-
brace several counties and towns
that have similar problems.
Johnson said, for example, that
a comprehensive survey of medical
conditions in the area would be
undertaken by the Department of
Health, Education and Welfare,
while the Agriculture Department
would emphasize its rural develop-
ment programs in the pilot dis-
tricts.
Teacher Corps
He said he will again urge Con-
gress to create the teacher corps
which would be asked to make
teams available forsthe planning
districts.
He also said the program would
make possible a financial incentive
to provide more doctors in poor
rural areas. This would be done
by extending government loans to
medical students who agree to
practice in poor rural areas.

They noted that nonfarmers now
outnumber farmers in these rural
areas.
Johnson told Congress too few
rural communities are able to
marshal sufficient physical, hu-
man, and financial resources to
achieve a satisfactory level of so-
cial and economic development.
Coordinate Planning
Stressing the need for coordi-
nated planning, Johnson said this
would make it possible to extend to

the people in outlying rural areas
a richer variety of public services-
and economic and cultural oppor-
tunities.
He said coordinated planning
can stimulate economic growth,
provide efficient public services
to attract business and industry,
and make possible adequate voca-
tional training so that rural work-
ers can become qualified for work
in new and expanding industries
within reach of their homes.

Anti-Poverty Program Extended
Millions More for Rural Areas

FLA SH!
The deadline for the Michigan Daily's
Special Apartment Supplement
has been extended. Space very limited.
CALL NOW-764-0560
DELTA PHI EPSILON
Men's Professional Foreign Service
Fraternity Announces
OPEN RUSH MEETING
THURSDAY, JAN. 27 . . . 7:30 P.M.
Recreation Room, International Center
SPEAKER: PROFESSOR MED IN
School of Education
"ALTERNATIVES TO SOCIAL.DEVELOPMENT
ABROAD: THE ROLE OF EDUCATION"
All men interested in Careers in Foreign Affairs

AREAS OF CONTROL IN VIET NAM-Black
locate.those portions of South Viet Nam in
government has some form of control over the

INCENTIVES:
USSR To Change
Farm Organization,

Officials said the
designed to improve
both farmers and

program is
the lot of
nonfarmers.

WELCOME

I

MOSCOW. ()-A commission
headed by Communist party sec-
cetary Leonid I. Brezhnev was an-
nounced yesterday to prepare new
rules for the 38,000 collective
farms forming the backbone of
backward Soviet agriculture.
Foreign quarters expect an in-
crease in incentives for collective
farmers, the most underpaid and
underprivileged group in the
Soviet Union.
Agriculture has fallen short of
goals, the Soviet diet is poorly
balanced, and wheat has been
imported in two of the last three
years.
In .-an effort to overcome this,
payments, to farms have been in-
creased recently and the rural
element of_ private enterprise in-.
creased by enlarging individual
gardens whose output can be sold
privately.
But the basic system of collec-
tives has remained uninspiring
for farmers.
New Commission
The vague official announce-
ment said the new commission on
rules had been instructed by the
Soviet Communist party's Central
Committee to study all proposals.
Brezhnev is the committee's first
secretary.
The statutes governing agricul-
ture are 30 years old. They were
fixed shortly after Stalin forcibly
collectivized agriculture in a cam-
paign in which millions, died in
famines caused by rural disloca-
tions.

Since then, farmers have been'
tied to the land, denied the rights
of travel enjoyed by other
Russians.
State Farms
In addition to collective farms
there are state farms. Investment
funds are supplied to state farms
by the government and the work-
ers guaranteed a government
wage.
Collectives were supposed to
save for investment and pay wages
from profits. In fact, the collec-
tives had little to invest, which
meant that they were not modern-
ized, and often paid farmers noth-
ing in cash.
There have been public hints,
some made by Brezhnev's prede-
cessor as Communist party boss,
Nikita S. Khrushchev, that the
system of collective farm rewards
had to be changed.
The old system pays farmers
for the number of work units they
earn. A day of digging potatoes
might mean one work unit. Total
units for all workers on a farm
were divided into profits, if any,
and the cash then handed out.
New System
Last year, the Soviet Union
adopted a system of tying, indus-
trial production rewards closer to
actual results than to meaning-
less indices of economic plans.
Some quarters think a similar
change might be coming now on
the farms.

I

""

2-piece SUITS
X1.35
A & P 1-HOUR
CLEANERS
312 E. Huron
CASH & CARRY
668-9500
APTS, GALORE
NEW and OLD BLDGS.
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL
Some summer sublets
available.

A

I

I i

hSound
insulated construction
U fIV(RITY TOWERS

I

I

L

I

I

" Now renting for Aug.
S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FOREST AVE. PF

'HONE: 7612680j

I,

I

---

....

Rich Bloch and the Gasliters
are at

ALL PRICES
ALL LOCATIONS

I

RI

Reis

I A 1

M

if

11 1 7-8 :--iU P.M. )b.UU

I

I. -~ '-~'~ ~ ~ ~-----------------...

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan