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January 25, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE, MICHIGAN UA llv

~~~T'' Y '

a -s a L~aa -. aa .P NJ.U ZNL NA NJ TI

ULESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1966

if you think there's
AT THE
.}
yt od
S S
4tiona Exhibi
"i?
sP
yox r ot f ou gr
(50c)
AND
LOTS OF YUKS
THIS WEEKEND
AT THE MICHIGAN UNION
FRIDAY FROM 7 to 12:30 P.M.
and SATURDAY 1 P.M. to 1 A.M.
Patronize Our Advertisers

--

71'

Icers

Frozen

in

Dakota

Deep

By GRAYLE HOWLETT
"Dakota" is an old Indian word
which means "allies," but the
rugged Sioux icers of North Da-
kota were far from friendly as
they handed the Michigan puck-
men 6-4 and 7-4 losses last week-
end, halting the Blue's win streak
at five.
Michigan didn't exactly receive
a "warm" welcome either, as the
temperature dipped to 21 degrees
below zero on Friday night and
25 below on Saturday night IN-
SIDE the unheated North Dakota
rink. Most of the players refused,
however, to cite the bitter cold as
a reason for the dual loss, prefer-
ring to give all the credit to the
Nodaks.
Great Hockey Weather
"No, I wouldn't say that the
freezing weather was a factor,"
commented Coach Al .Renfrew.
"North Dakota just has a real,
good hockey team." Still the frost-
bite conditions were a major topic
of _conversation.
Captain Mel Wakabayashi stat-
ed, "Sure, it is hard to adjust, but
you can't blame it on the weather.
They had to play under the same
conditions. I still can't believe how
all those fans could sit through
the game."
While the spectators were try-
ing every conceivable way to keep
warm-from huddling up tight to
raiding their hip flasks, Michigan
and North Dakota were chasing
pucks up and down the ice. Both

games were high scoring affairs
and closer than the scores might
indicate. Each time it was a dis-
asterous third period which proved
fatal to the Wolverines.

Freeze
This weekend Michigan will
have at least one thing going for
them-home, a word which means
a heated rink.

both games," said Renfrew, "but
then they would score a couple
quick ones on breakaways." Soph-
omore goalie Harold Herman, who
made some brilliant saves on
blank shots, could only add, "we
let down in the third period and
they really started to put the
pressure on."
It was not a totally lost week-
end as the "kid-line" of Mike and
Lee Marttila and Bruce Koviak
showed signs of coming of age.
Koviak scored seven points in all,
getting two goals and an assist in
Friday's game and collecting one
assist and a hat trick in Satur-
day's finale.
'Kid Koviak'
In the first game, Koviak's goals
rallied the Blue from a 4-2 deficit
into a tie, and, in the second, his
three goal effort kept the puckmen
within striking distance until the
fated final period.
If losing two in row in the frigid
north, plus getting nosed out of
second place isn't enough, there's
always the news that lash year's
conference scoring leader, Waka-
bayashi, scored only one point the
entire series. While Mel was fail-
ing to add to his personal total,
the Nodaks' Terry Casey and Den-
nis Mexstall intensified their chal-
lenge for Mel's crown with im-
pressive performances that netted
them several points apiece.
Also in the negative column,
Michigan's Bob Ferguson was
handed a one game suspension for

his extra curricular activity in a I "We're still in excellent shape,"
20 minute brawl which preceded admitted Renfrew, "and we'll be
the third period of Saturday's ready to go Friday. Anytime you
game. mplay the No. 1 team you're ready
Cool, Man, Cool to go. We'd love to take two, but
All in all, the fracas resulted in we would also settle for a split."
six men sitting in the penalty box Remember Boston
at one time, arid, on a night like The Blue should be ready be-
that, two minutes of inactivity cause Tech plays the same hard,
was an effective "cooling off" fore-checking type of game that
period. the Nodaks played. Besides, the
The general reaction of the team Michigan icers are out to ,gain
after the two losses is to forget some revenge from a 7-6 loss suf-
about it and prepare for the cru- fered at the hands of Tech in the
cial series with the league-leading Boston Arena Tournament over
Huskies from Michigan Tech. the holidays.
Tech, currently 9-1 on the' year, A sweep of the two game series
is back on the winning path after would elevate the Wolverines back
dropping a 5-4 decision to North into second place, just a game off
Dakota last week as they came the pace. But as Coach Renfrew
back to beat the Sioux the next said, "To win you have to have a
night and took two straight from lot of things going for you when
Denver in overtime, you play those guys."

I W(IA

Standin gs

I

W L Pet.
Michigal Tech 9 1 .900
North Dakota 8 4 .667
MICHIGAN 5 3 .625
"Minresota 6 5 .545
Colorado 4 6 .400
Denver 4 6 .400
Michigan State 4 7 .363
Minnesota (Duluth) 0 9 .000
FRIDAY NIGHT'S RESULTS
North Dakota 6, Michigan 4
Minnesota 8, Colorado 4
Michigan Tech 1, Denver 0 (ovt)
Michigan State 6, Duluth 5
SATURDAY NIGHT'S RESULTS
North Dakota 7, Michigan 4
Minnesota 10, Colorado 0
Michigan Tech 5, Denver 4 (ovt)
Michigan State 5, Duluth 4 (ovt)

STAGER PLEASED:
Tanker Strategy Beats State

MIKE MARTTILA
precarious 2-1 lead, and rattled
the nets twice in the last 20 min-
utes of Saturday night's game to
wrap up their second straight vic-
tory.
"We had the chances early in

Win Skein Einds for Wrestlers

By JOHN SUTKUS
The old adage that all good
things must come to an end has
been proven true again.
This time it was an especially
good thing that came to a screech-
ing halt. Last Friday night the
wrestlers of Minnesota put an end
to Michigan's string of dual meet
wrestling victories. Before a pack-
ed house of Wolverine fans the
Gophers allowed the Michigan
matmen only the first and last
matches and swept every other
contest to complete the deed.

not mean the whole season was*
gone. "What we lost in this meet
we intend to make up with hard
work and dedication." He indicat-
ed extra stress on wrestling fun-
damentals.
Meanwhile, Gopher coach Wally
Johnson was very pleased with his
team's victory. But he qualified
his satisfaction. "Actually the
meet could have gone either way.
We had a couple' of boys hurt,
they had a couple of key boys hurt.
It will be a different story when
the Big Ten championships come
around."

To be sure, Minnesota came to
town with more than a kiss and a
prayer. In advance Coach Cliff
Keen had anticipated a tough
meet. He labeled-the Gopher squad
"top n o t c h." And Minnesota
proved to be just that, as they
handed the Wolverines an 18-8
loss.
'They Were Better'
"They were the better team on,
that day," commented assistant
coach Dennis Fitzgerald. But he
emphasized that this one meet did

No One Match
Though many Wolverine fans
may think different, there was no
one match that decided the meet.

"I

True, Bill Johannesen's last-
minute loss to Terry Barett seemed
to have an effect on the team.
But as Fitzgerald pointed out, such
a match usually has the opposite
effect. "A team will get fired up
and win."
Cal Jenkins' match started off
with a bang as he was lifted up
and slammed to the mat. He hit

so hard that Coach Keen stopped
the match to check him. Jenkins
was all right and continued the
contest. "The slam stunned him in
the beginning, but it didn't cause
him to lose the match," added
Fitzgerald.
The only bright spots of 'the
night were the 123 pound and
heavyweight matches. In the 123-
pound contest, Dave Fehrs started
the night off right for the Wol-
verines by completely outwrestling
his Gopher opponent. He won
handily, 11-3.
Heavyweight Dave Porter end-
ed the meet on a happy note by
pinning Minnesota's Jon Staebler
in 6:25.
In between was disastei'.
Waterman vs. Anderson
A typical example was the 167-
pound match between Michigan's
Bill Waterman and Ted Anderson.
Waterman took an early lead on a
reversal. He moved Anderson
around well and began to pull the
Gopher over for the pin. As he did
so he became just a little careless
and was himself reversed. Ander-
son scored a near pin and event-
ually won the match, 8-5. Water-
man made several game tries at a
comeback, but all fell short.
The dual meet win streak is
history now. Perhaps it is better
that it has ended, for with it has
departed the unseen pressure that
such a skein can cause.
When the Big Ten wrestling
championships come around, dual
meet scores will mean nothing.
ELECTRONIC
DESK TOP
CALCULATOR{

By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
Michigan did better than they
had expected against State Friday
night, and coach Gus Stager was
well satisfied with his 70-53 vic-
tory.
"Actually," said Stager, "there
were only two trouble spots and
Stheyboth occurred early in the
meet."
The first was the 1000-yd. free-
style, where Carl Robie and Bill
Farley were supposed to take one-
two honors. Farley had been sick,
and placed third behind State's
Ed Glick.
The other disappointment came
two events later in the 200-yd.
freestyle when Jim MacMillan
beat Bob Hoag by three-tenths of
a second.
Key Events
Two events decided the meet.
John Vry, a junior, beat out team-
mate Ken Wiebec in the 200-yd.
individual medley by .01 second,
which would have registered as a
tie using hand-timing methods.
Commented the surprised and very
pleased Stager, "Vry did a very
fine job."
The event that really iced the
meet was the 100-yd. freestyle,
with first and second place going
to Bob Haag and Bill Groft. Groft
had already won the 50-yd. free-
style and Hoag took second in the
200-yd. freestyle.: And after that,
the meet was pretty well wrapped
up.
One of the major causes of vic-
tory was Bruce Brown, who won
both the one and three meter div-
ing events, with the awesome score
of 345.4 for three meters. No
eulogizing adjectives are really
necessary.
Words Fail
Similarly, what do you say
about a guy like Carl Robie, who
won the 1000-yd. freestyle and
2'00-yd. butterfly? "You just ex-
pect him to win and he consis-
tently does," says Stager.
Although the only pool record
was set by State's Gary Dilley in
the backstroke, Coach Stager was
quite satisfied with the times. Al-
most all of them bettered their
Indiana meet counterparts by
about a second.
In the MSU meet, Michigan re-
peated a trick used by Indiana,
i.e., swimming the best man in a
lane apart from that of the best
State swimmer. But there is a dif-
ference between Michigan's strat-
egy and Indiana's, who kept their
best man in an off-lane in order
to slow down our times.
Stager figured that Robie and
Paul Scheerer, who swam in off

lanes, would win anyway, so he
put men in the middle who would
benefit by the competition.
Triangular Next
This Saturday the natators will
swim a dual meet with Purdue in
the afternoon, and triangular meet
with OSU and MSU at night.
Stager is glad of the chance to
compete in the triangular meet in
addition to the regular one be-

cause he wants to give the Wol-
verines as much home experience
as possible.
Besides a comedy diving inter-
lude, by Michigan's three diving
coaches, five new events will be
added in the triangular. This will
give practice in them before the
championships. According to Stag-
er, the meet ought to be pretty
good.

E
V
$

BILL FARLEY finishes third in the grueling 1000-yard freestyle
event against Michigan State last Friday, despite running a tem-
perature and showing symptoms of the flu. Farley and teammates
splashed to their third dual victory in the Big Ten.
FORMER CARDINAL:
Ken Boyer Signs record
Contract with NY Mets

4

dscount records, AMP,,
TWO LOCATIONS ON CAMPUS!

0

300 S. STATE ST.
(corner of Liberty)'

1235 S. UNIVERSITY
(in University Towers)

BE SALE

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on ALL

FIRST SHOWING
IN THE
ANN ARBOR AREAL

I

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ANGEL FOLKWAYS VERVE
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buy one L.P. at our regular discount price-
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The Victor Electronic Calcula-
tor will be on display and dem-
onstrated to University Person-
nel from 9:00 A.M. to I1:00
A.M. Wed., Jan. 26 in room
3X of the Michigan' Union. It
will also be on display in room j
101 at Inn America on Wash-j
tenaw Rd. from 12:00 noon toj
5:00 P.M. 1
For further information, Call
A & D Business Machines, Inc.,1
3022 Packard Road, Ann Arbor, '
Michigan. Telephone 761-0080. 1'

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Ken Bayer, seven-
time All-Star third baseman and
the National League's Most Valu-
able Player two years ago, signed
his 1966 contract yesterday with
the New York Mets.
The 35-year-old infielder, ac-
quired from St. Louis last October
after a poor season with the
Cardinals, becomes the highest-
paid player for baseball's least
successful -team-with a salary es-
timated at $65,000.
George Weiss, president of the
Mets, said "Despite his disap-
pointing season Boyer will receive
the same salary he got in St. Louis.
I don't believe a player of his
caliber should be cut after one
poor year.
"We came to terms quickly-
after one five-minute conversa-
tion."
In St. Louis, where he still
makes his home, Boyer said he
was "very pleased with the con-
tract."
After playing a leading role in
the Cards' pennant-winning drive
in 1964, starring in the World
Series triumph over the New York
Yankees, and being named MVP,

bothered by a bad back and hit
only .260, with 13 homers and 75
runs batted in.
In 10 previous major league
seasons, Boyer had compiled a .296
batting mark with an average of
24 homers and 93 RBI. He batted
.295 in 1964, hitting 24 homers and
knocking in 119 runs. His highest
average for the Cards was .329, in
1961.
In the Cardinals' sweeping
player turnover after last season,
Boyer was dealt to the Mets for
left-handed pitcher Al Jackson
and third baseman Charlie Smith.
Boyer said he had been kicked
below the left knee by one of his
horses recently, adding, "I needed
eight stitches but it doesn't bother
me. It won't hurt my playing.
"I'm in pretty good, shape, and
really looking forward to the sea-
son.
Boyer has been working out with
other baseball players in the area
in regular training sessions at the
St. Louis University gym,
The Mets, who. navefinished
last in all four seasons they've
been in the National League, also
announced the signing of outfield-
er Cleon Jones and pitcher Jerry

40

HAIRSTYLING
TO PLEASE !
at
Dascola Barbers
(near Michigan Theatre)
and
U-M Barbers
N. University

I I

I _ i

J

U

I Boyer slumped last year. He was I Hinsley.

0

Were
5.79
SFCC'rNI I P M

9

Were
4.79

Were
S3.79

89

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on Y- 3P'i
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