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January 20, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-20

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 20.196r,

i

PA~E|T |||IC IG N AIYTH-SAY-JNURY20 -6

LLOYD GRAFF

Gophers Face Grapplers

THE STATS SPEAK:
Caz Tops in All Departments

The Sticky Problems
Of Good Guymanship
And how's your identity crisis-lately?
I was trembling on the brink of substance yesterday when I read
an item that kicked me back into the morass of confusion.
This fellow named Dick Sisler is getting the annual "Good Guy
Award" from the New York sportswriters on Jan. 30. Sisler managed
the Cincinnati Reds last season toa third place finish. It was his
first shot as a major league manager, and Cincy canned him right
after the season ended.
Well, here I am ready to graduate with. the Tormenting
Decisions to make. Who am I; what should I be; what should I
do? Who should I be? You know the bit. You're an extroverted
recluse, a selfish humanitarian, a hotblooded cool guy, a con-
servative revolutionary, a savior rat. We mental chameleons have
our problems.
Comes the "Good Guy Award" to a fellow who got fired, and
then I read about sassy, arrogant Leo Durocher who coined the
phrase "good guys finish last." He landed the managership of the
Chicago Cubs for forty grand per annum.
The problems of good guymanship nags. I mean, most of us
wouldn't mind being good guys if it paid, but a substantial body
of empirical evidence indicates it probably doesn't. A big wad of
history is martyrology.
The fact is, that if you're going to be a good guy you've got
to accept the vicissitudes. The world will kick you around whether
you're lovable or a cuss, but the good guys' welts will be deeper.
The question is whether the cushion of good guymanship is softer
than the pillow of rattiness. Does the satisfaction of being a
good guy compensate for the gains of being a louse?
You're Wretched...
The problem with being a good guy though, is that you end up
thinking you're a wretch. If you're a louse, however, you billow with
self esteem and accept the accolades of your peers.
The truly good people seem acutely aware of their failings. Con-
sider the humane and worthwhile people you know. They're down on
themselves aren't they? They're openly self critical, frequently in-
secure, usually lonely. They are more often distraught than content.
Now think of the blissful ruthless rats among your acquaintances.
They appear quite pleased with themselves-their status, friends,
achievements, personality. Distressing, isn't it. And such a majority.
These are idle ramblings anyway because if you have to decide.
on an essential code of behavior, you're probably lost already. I have
little faith in rational choice of the good. Perhaps you evolve into
behavior rather than willfully pointing your nose in the direction of
the noble, then propelling yourself to the destination.
It is a simple matter to give charity, but so difficult to feel
charitably.
And yet in another way it's easy to think highminded and
and act lowdown.
If only wearing a white hat were enough.

By CLARK NORTON
A Minnesota mat crew term-
ed by Wolverine wrestling Coach
Cliff Keen "as tough as any in
Gopher history" invades the Wol-
verines' home territory Friday
night in what shapes up to be one
of the best matches of the year.

Terry Barrett, and returning let-
termen John Klein, Bob Ramstad
and Jon Staebler.
Anderson, at 123 pounds, is a
former Minnesota state high
high school champ, and will face
conference champion Bob Fehrs,
who has lost only one this sea-

in the quadrangular meet at Chi-
cago and serves as captain for
the Gopher squad.sReplacing the
other injured Michigan grappler,
Dave Dozeman, will be Gordon
Weeks, in the 130 pound class.
Weeks' competition figures to be
Larry Lloyd, a junior and former
Iowa state high, school wrestling
champ.
"The loss of Kamman and Doze-
man is bound to handicap us,"
Keen remarked. "They are two
very important members of the
squad. Dozeman's injury, fortu-
nately, is not very serious - he
has a sprain in his back-but he
will most likely be out of action
this one week."
What, No TV?
The Minnesota game will;
NOT be broadcast on TV,
WJBK or otherwise, according
to latest information. Tickets
are now on sale at the ticket
office, 511 E. Hoover. The game
begins at 1:30 p.m. Saturday.
At 147 pounds Minnesota will
have Bob Henry, rated an out-
standing wrestler. Although he
broke his wrist at the start of
last year's campaign, the senior
letterman is coming back strong.
Henry will face Cal Jenkins of
the Wolves, who was injured last
season, but is undefeated in ac-
tion this year.

By BOB LEES
When he blew a dunk shot Sat-
urday night, the crowd groaned.,
But they didn't groah for long-
he doesn't miss for long.
By the time the game had run
its course, Cazzie Russell, Mich-
igan's - and everybody's - All-
American, had scored 39 points,
pulled down 20 rebounds, and led
the Blue to a 93-86 come-from-
behind victory at Northwestern.
But more than that, he has raised
his career point total to 1744, a
Michigan scoring record, eclipsing
the previous mark of 1725 set by
Bill Buntin last year. He is also
on his way to breaking Michigan's
individual season scoring mark,
which he himself holds, getting
694 points last year while shoot-
ing a cool 48.6 per cent from the
floor and 81.7 per cent from the
foul line. With 11 games to go in
the regular season, Caz will set or
approach records every time he
hoops a point.
In this, his last season of varsity
basketball, Cazzie is having his
greatest year ever. He leads the
team in everything but broken
shoelaces. His 29.2 scoring aver-
age leac the Big Ten, rests
among the top five nationwide,
and would be even higher were it
not for thenfact thatnumber ei
assists is one of his team-leading
categories.
Chicago Man
Cazzie, Chicago-born, seems to
do especially well before the home-
town crowd, averaging 40 points
a game this year in the Windy
City. Against highly-regarded San
Francisco at Chicago Stadium on

Dec. 11, he hit 16 field goals and
13 free throws for 45 points, a
Michigan individual mark for one
game.
No Wolverine fan can forget
the number of times Cazzie has
led Michigan from the brink of
disaster to victory. Last year he
twice hit game-winning field goals
at the buzzer, made 11 points
against Princeton in the last 412
minutes as the Wolverines came
from behind to beat the Tigers by
two, got five in 33 seconds in one
game as Michigan won by two,,
and scored eight points in over-
time in a five-point Michigan
victory.
But the Wolverines' offense is!

not based entirely on one m .n.
The team as a whole is averag .ng
89.2 points per game, while hold-
ing its opponents to 79.7. Second
to Cazzie in individual scoring is
John Clawson with 14.9, while
Jim Myers and Oliver Darden are
also in double figures, averaging
11.8 and 11.4 respectively. In field
goals, Cazzie's 146 total is followed
by those of Clawson, Myers, and
Darden, who have 82, 65, and 53
respectively.
Darden, who has been deadly
the past few games from the foul
line, has 31 thus far to hold second
place behind Cazzie's 88, but this
total is closely followed by Claw-
son's 30. Myer's 24, and Craig
Dill's 22.
Count Them In
T h e rebounding department
shows the same familiar faces in
the lead positions. Cazzie, of
course, leads with 116, but Ollie
has 109 to remain close behind,
followed by Clawson with 97 and
Myers with 85. The team as a
whole has pulled down 627 re-
bounds, 68 more than its oppo-
nents, which comes as a surprise
to those who felt that the loss of
Bill Buntin would hurt Michigan's
board strength.
With three starters gone from
last year's team, many observers
felt that the Wolverines would not
be as stronga contender for the
Big Ten crown. But any team with
Cazzie Russell is a team to be
reckoned with. Michigan has a
team, and Michigan has Russell.
'Nutt said.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER

4

A.
1

GOPHER MATMAN JIM ANDERSON will be pitted against Big
Ten champion Bob Fehrs tomorrow night in the 123-lb. division
battle. Anderson, a 5-8 sophomore from Fridley, Minn., is rated as

a top prospect for the Gophers.
The Minnesota grapplers already
have two impressive victories un-
der their belts, one in a quad-
rangular meet in Chicago includ-
ing Big Ten opponents North-
western, Michigan State, and,
Purdue, and another over Iowa;
in a dual meet 32-0.
"This will be a battle of un-
beatens and one of our toughest
tests in the past four years," em-
phasized Keen. "Minnesota has
no weak spots on its entire team,
and, along with Michigan State
and ourselves, should be the teams
to beat in the conference."
Impressive Lineup
Minnesota Coach Wally John-
son seemed overly modest earlier
when he remarked, "We should
be fairly strong this year." The
Gophers are led by undefeated
sophomores Jim Anderson and
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
St. John's (N.Y) 82, St. Joseph's
(Pa.) 72
Cincinnati 85, Bradley 69
Louisville 94, Dayton 77
Detroit 101, Villanova 94
Georgia Tech 89, Georgia 56
Harvard 74, Dartmouth 70
Hope 74, Kalamazoo 69
Miami (Ohio) 88, Western Michigan 70
Eastern Michigan 90, Wayne State 75
NBA
Philadelphia, 110, Detroit 93
Boston 129, Baltimore 89
NHL
Toronto 6, New York 2

The meet will take place at 7:30
son. Barrett, at 137, will face Wol- tomorrow night in the IM Sports
verine captain Bill Johannesen, Building. A victory will extend
also Big Ten champ last year. Michigan's dual meet conquest
Klein, a regular last year, will record to 35 straight.
wrestle in the 167 pound division
against Bill Waterman. "Klein is
a real hot-shot," offered Keen.
Ramstad will be pitted in the 177
pound class against sophomore
Wayne Wentz of Michigan, who is
also undefeated. The heavyweight
division will find big Staebler at
245 pounds, facing outstanding

CAZZIE RUSSELL

4

Join The Daily
Sports Staff

Wolverine sophomore Dave Por-
ter. Porter has just one varsity
setback.
Kamman Replaced
The three remaining three
matches should not offer any less
challenge for the Wolves. Perhaps
the major problem facing Coach
Keen will be replacing the two
Michigan wrestlers who will prob-
ably be incapacitated this Friday.
"Jim Kamman is definitely out
with a knee injury in the 157
pound class," Keen revealed. The
same injury required Kamman to
default his match last week at
Northwestern. Either junior Burt
Merical or sophomore Wayne
Hansen will go against Lee Gross,
a junior who is 1964 Big Ten
champion. Gross finished second
I.

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Introduction to Ecumenical Dialogue
"Uniting and Devisive Factors
in the 19th Century"
Speaker: Fr. Ray Betanzos
Thurs., Jan. 20 7:00-8:30 P.M.
Presbyterian Campus Center

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~~u\Ik~\U -. r....

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