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August 27, 1965 - Image 29

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

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MEN,

FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PA;E SE

rRWAY, AUGUST ~7, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE AK VEIL

-- - . ;

U.S. Air Bombings Inflict Economic Havoc on Hanoi

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
North Viet Nam has severe eco-
nomic aches and pains caused by
the war in the South and United
States air action against northern
territory.
The U.S. is listening for hints
from Hanoi of any shift in its
demands on behalf of the Viet
Cong in the South. Evidently E
North Viet Nam's economy is tot-
tering and therefore a change in
its attitude cannot be excluded.
Hanoi insists the U.S. bombings
have failed to damage its econ-
omy, but for the past five months
its internal propaganda has belied
this claim. The big question is
whether Hanoi, in exchange for
cessation of the bombings, would,
support a truce in the South to
permit negotiations.
U.S. Aid
The U.S. pours between $2.5 mil-
lion and $3 million daily into the
war.
President Ho Chi Minh's gov-
ernment seems to regard the aid
it has been getting from the Com-
munist world as niggardly. It has
advised its public to "do away
with the mentality of relying on
foreign assistance" and "promote
industry, plain living and thrifti-
ness."
Premier Ph am Van Dong told

the national Assembly last April,
"We must rely mainly on our own
resources while doing our best to
win the sympathy asd assistance
of the world's people, first of all
the fraternal Socialist countries."
Squeeze Painful
Since then, the squeeze probably
has become more painful.
Figures on the cost of the war
to North Viet Nam are lacking.
Communist regimes presumably
chip in to sustain Hanoi's defenses
or help finance aid to the Viet
Cong.
Communist China gives no fig-
ures on its aid to Hanoi. Soviet
officials announced in June 1964
that Russia had invested the
equivalent of $350 million in the
Hanoi regime, apparently all inj
economic aid. That was before the
U.S. bombings in the North. Since
then Moscow presumably installed
costly missile sites. Other com-
munist countries promised help,
but no announcements have been
made on what; if anything, was
delivered.
Give Bright Side
North Viet Nam's own accounts
and reports published in Soviet,
European and other communist
papers try to present the bright
side, but contain lines like these:
"As the heaviest air strikes
usually occur at noon, in most
enterprises the working time has

SOUTH VIETNAMESE TROOPS cross a jungle creek In search of Communist Viet Cong guerillas
and mountain tribesmen. The wooden bridge across the creek was destroyed by the Viet Cong, mak-
ing the stream difficult and dangerous to cross. This detail is part of the military operation in Dar-
lac Plateau, 160 miles northeast of Saigon.

been divided into two parts-
starting in early morning with a
long break during the day and
continuing again in the evening.
Many enterprises now employ 70
per cen$ women, who replace men
gone into the army. The evacua-
tion of children and elderly people
proceeds according to plan.
Though certain things had to be
rationed, such as =rice, meat, sugar,
cotton material, speculation and
blackmarketing is nonexistent."
Evidently transport has been
damaged and industrial production,
somewhat disrupted. Extension of
the war to the North seems also
to have badly damaged food and
consumer goods production.
No Announcement
Hanoi has made no announce-
ment about increased taxes or
other measures to finance war
preparations. In fact, it claims it
has even been able to lower some
consumer prices. The evidence is
that Hanoi is trying topay its way
by total mobilization and belt-
tightening measures.
North Viet Nam suffered losses
from floods and typhoons in 1964:
Now it has met new difficulties in
mobilizing men and women to
train for possible fighting, drain-
ing 'needed manpower from food
and industry production.
The government has indicated
it had difficulty meeting food re-
quirements, saying it just "man-
aged to meet part" of the require-
ments to insure supplies and
equipment to goods and consumer
industries.
Enroll Women
The government mounted a
campaign to enroll women to re-
place "men who have gone to the
front." It ordered measures to
"insure adequate supplies of, man-
power and resources for fighting
duties and economic develop-j
ment," which it said could be
done "only on thevbasis of raising
production."
Mobilization has seemed fairly
complete. It includes , army, re-
gional troops, guerrillas, self-
defense corps, and rear forces.
All this is extremelycostly.
"We are facing heavy' costs in
the field of production and fight-
Ing, a greatly increased volume of
work and rising demands in man-
power," a recenxt government an-
nouncement told the North Viet-
namese.

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PROGRAM
FR I DAY, AUG. 27
9 A.M.-6 P.M.
8 P.M.
9 P.M.-12MN.
SAT., AUG. 28
8 P.M.'
SUN., AUG. 29
9:15A.M.
2:00 P.M.

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OPEN HOUSE
Come over to meet people
ORIENTATION DANCE
featuring THE ASCOTS
(They play everything well.)
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT NIGHT
Reception for international
students
MASS FOR NEW STUDENTS
AND FRESHMEN
Breakfast following Mass. Meet the
faculty and hear Prof. Sinnott.
PICNIC-Meet at the Center

By The Associated Press
WASHINGTON-The U.S. pat-
tern of bombing in Communist
North Viet Nam has moved up
the scale to include electric power
plants and dams.
Whether this, pointed up in
new strikes against such targets
over the weekend, means esca-
lation of the war appears to de-
pend on semantics.
Is a complex which includes
power plants, dams and locks a
military target or is it attack on
a segment of the civilian scene
which also is militarily useful to
the enemy?
Military Targets
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara, in a news conference
last April 26, emphasized that the
air strikes then being conducted
by U.S. and South Vietnamese
planes were "carefully limited to
military targets."
He listed the types-transit
points, barracks, supply depots,
ammunition depots-afllof them
used along the route by which
military manpower and equipment
were being infiltrated into South
Viet Nam. Then he said there had
been added to the target system
railroads, highways and bridges
"which are the foundation of the
infiltration routes."
On April 4, a routine announce-
ment of operations said that a
bridge had been hit and added
that a steam power plant near the
bridge was also hit by U.S. Air
Force planes.

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July 30, Navy planes from a
carrier struck again at the steam
plant near Thanh Hoa.
Then Sunday, 11 Air Force F105
jets struck the complex near
Thanh Hoa again. Pilots reported1
heavy damage on the generator
hall and a transformer building<
and said that a dam and lock sys-
tem was damaged.<
This series of strikes on the
same target complex thus appear
to make it evident the operationsi
were at a "directed" target, not
bad aiming while working on a
neighboring target.]
The target complex includes
dams and accompanying locks,
which presumably have the func-
tions of both supplying hydro-
electric power and facilitating
shipment of goods, civilian and
military, along the river. The
power-generating plants supply
electricity for homes and Indus-
trial factories.
Soviet Aid
A U.S. Army handbook on Viet
Nam lists aid given by the Soviet
Union and Communist China to
North Viet Nam.
The list includes under Soviet
aid this Item:
"Sixteen thermal steam electric
power plants at Thanh Hoa, Vinh,
Lao Kay, Phu Tho, Cha Pa; power
transmission lines and transform-
er substations; two hydroelectric
power plants."
Bombing Maps
It seems entirely possible that
these facilities, in addition to the
Thanh Hoa complex, probably are
plotted on bombing maps for pos-
sible future attention.
Attack Sites
The U.S. bombing book now
includes both directed and Inci-
dental attack on newly discovered
sites for the Soviet-designed sur-
face to air missile sites in North
Viet Nam.
Two have been blasted by
American bombers in recent
weeks. Since then, the Defense
Department has informed pilots
on directed missions or armed re-
connaissance sorties that hence-
forth they may hit "targets of
opportunity" when they see some-
thing that obviously is one of the
semifixed missile sites while fly-
ing another mission.
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