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August 27, 1965 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-08-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'PAGE THREF

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FRIDAY, AUGUST 27, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PRWAY, AUQUST 27, 1988 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TUREE

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Defends

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Husband's Role

in Mediation'

COURTING?

TRY THE INTELLECTUAL

(Continued from Page 2)
In reference to another part of
the New Republic article, Mrs.
Martin said that Bosch "never
asked John Martin for an air-
plane" to return to the Domini-
can Republic. She said that a
week after the rebellion began,
Bosch asked if it would do any
good to return and was told by
Martin that if he did at that time
he might be killed.
Bosch called for the revolution
against Reid, in which many peo-
ple were killed. But he had "no
moral right" to call for the up-
rising if he did not return. In the
U.S. press, Bosch has been harsh-
ly criticized for his failure to
leave Puerto Rico. And so, Mrs.
Martin said, "perfectly naturally
and understandably," Bosch is
now making his position "harder
and harder," saying things that
two months ago he did not say
to the New York Times.
Little Sense
She said that it makes as much
sense for Bosch, who was in Puer-
to Rico all during the uprising,
to speak authoritatively for what
happened during it "as for me or
anyone else." (In his Life article,
Martin says of his meeting with
Bosch during the fighting, "he
did not want to talk to me about
events, since I had said publicly
that in my judgment his party
had fallen under the domination
of adventurers and Castro-Com-
munists and that his country was
being ripped to pieces. He could
not believe what I said. How could
he? He was in Puerto Rico, not
Santo Domingo. I would not have
believed it had I not seen it.")
Thus Mrs. Martin quarrels with
Bosch's idea that the Dominican
people will be forever embittered
against the U.S. 'She feels this
idea is "pretty sophisticated." A
more realistic view, she explained,
is that some of them may be
temporarily embittered. They are
not a hostile. people, but "gentle
and likeable," she added.
Describing the population fur-
ther, she said that 70 per cent of
thei Dominicans live outside the
capital. The campesinos, as they
are called, live on the land. Thoy
"have no dollar income. They are
outside the money market," liv-
ing by trading goods. "By and
large, they are illiterate, unedu-
cated and predominantly colored.
They are really the dispossessed."
'Less Sophisticated'
Mrs.; Martin finds the Domini-
cans "less sophisticated and much
more primitive" than the Cubans,
who "saw an awful lot of Ameri-
cans over many years." The Do-
minical Republic, she pointed out,
has never been a tourist haven.

Asked if this rural population
is aware of the meaning of the
governmental seizures which con-
vulse their land from time to time,
she said many of them are not.
"What they know basically is
that nobody's ever done a darned
thing for them and they're right."
By and large, she said, "the Do-
minicans are neither anti-Ameri-
can nor pro-Communist." They
are very nationalistic. Concerned
with their own misery and disease,
they want freedom, 5fe added.
Economically, the little country
is heavily dependent on the world's
sugar price because its one prin-
cipal crop is sugar, Mrs. Martin
said. To aid the country, the U.S.
has tried to get it to diversify
into other crops.
Primitive
Describing the primitive nature
of the countryside, Mrs. Martin
said that it is "almost like' Bibli-
cal days." And Voodoo supersti-
tion is strong, as many of the rur-
al people have a culture and a
life predominantly Haitian.
Mrs. Martin said that the primi-
tive nature of the country is also
reflected in its lack of leaders,
addingthat for what she had said
about the Dominican Republic,

the name of South Viet Nam
could be substituted. A nation's
people, she said, need "political
stability to advance social and eco-
nomic programs to better their
lives."
Mrs. Martin chalks up the ab-
solute source of many of the Do-
minicans' problems to lack of edu-
cation. Quoting Adlai Stevenson,
she said, "'You can't have an
improved society with unimproved
people'." She said that aid funds
are needed to teach the Domini-
cans to read in their own language
and that the people must be edu-
cated to revitalize the human re-
sources, for health, sanitation and
progressive leadership in political
matters. Aid funds, Mrs. Martin
suggested, should be made avail-
able both for education and for
vocation school programs, to
teach the young men to become
carpenters, electricians and plumb-
ers. This, she said, "might keep
them from throwing rocks and
overturning cars in the streets."
Mrs. Martin described how many
intelligent men in the Dominican
Republic suffer from a lack of
formal education. One man she
knew, the governor of a province
of 84,000 people, could not sign

his name. "Think what he could
do if he were literate," she said.
Expanding on the subject of
education and related problems in
the Dominican Republic, Mrs.
Martin said "primitive people
don't feel like building a country.
They simply don't have the ener-
gy-their diet is faulty."
The Dominicans, she continued,
are not lazy, even though "in the
countryside, everyone folds up
from noon to 4 p.m. They are
undernourished. Rice and beans
won't sustain life as we know it in
our climates."
Mrs. Martin said she found the
Dominicans neither apathetic, nor
stupid, but "bright and industrious,

pressing disgust with experts who
denounce the Latin character,
Mrs. Martin said "there is nothing
wrong with the Latin character-
there is a 'good deal wrong with
their diet."
Many Latins feel basically in-
ferior to North Americans, which
leads to a lack of confidence in
themselves and a reluctance to as-
sume responsibility, she explained.
Could Aid
Mrs. Martin said that U.S.-aid-
ed educational programs could im-
prove the diet, the standard of
living and the stability of the Do-
minican Republic, "instead of im-
posing U.S. know-how, or giving
handouts, which only adds to their

If the education process could be
set in motion in underdeveloped
nations, she asserted, it could
"make them see what they could
do for themselves. They could build
their societies by themselves."
Regarding her personal feelings
for the Dominican Republic, Mrs.
Martin said, "I feel mostly parti-
san, as my husband does, on be-
half of the people of the Domini-
can Republic. I don't want an ad-
venturer who might turn Commu-
nist and then turn the. country
over to Soviet occupation or a
home-grown type of Communist
state. Equally, I don't want to
support the status quo if the stat-
us quo means rightist military dic-
tatorship."

K ICK;

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