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December 03, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3y 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 3,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

i s# ./1 #.J iiliViiiil

I

Convict

White
Slaying

41Li President
frlaDaman Sees '66 as

I -_____________ _______________________________________________

in

July

of

Enterprlse'
Raids Sites
SIn Viet Namn
SAIGON ()-The aircraft car-
rier Enterprise, nuclear-powered
pride of the U.S. Navy, hurled
jets against Viet Cong targets yes-
terday in her combat debut. Good
and bad luck mingled for this big-
gest of the world's warships.
Sleek planes of the 85,000-ton
"Big E" flew 124 missions against
Red guerrillas and their installa-
tions in South Viet Nam.
But two were lost-one downed
by guerrilla fire and the other
ditched in the South China Sea
after failing in five attempts to
land on the 4%-acre flight deck
on returning from its assignment.
All the four crewmen involved
were saved.
Lose Two Planes
Two other American planes, a
Navy A-4 Skyhawk and an Air
Force F-105 Thunderchief, were
lost in widespread air operations.
Communist gunners shot them!
down during raids on two bridges
in North 'Viet Nam's Red River3
Valley, one 35 miles and the othei
50 miles north of Hanoi.
A spokesman'said no parachutes'
were spotted by other raiders andI
the two pilots were believed to
have been killed. Returning crew- 1
men said they spotted four 'sur-
face to air missiles in flight in
the area where the F-105 was
downed, but none scored hits.
American spokesmen announc-
ed U.S. Air Force planes attack-
ed two missile sitess 25 and 401
miles northeast of Hanoi on Wed-
nesday. Heavy dust and smoke
prevented an immediate assess-'
ment of the damage.
Ground operations remained in
a relative lull, with fighting lim-
ited to small, sporadic incidents.
Loss, of the two Enterprise
planes recalled the ill-starred first
war mission of another big Ameri-
can military element, the Guam-
based B-52 jet bombers of the
U.S. Strategic Air Command.
Of 30 of the' eight-engine gi-
ants assigned to the initial sat-
uration bombing of a Zone D jun-I
gle area north of Saigon last June
18, two collided and crashed at
sea, killing eight crewmen.
The carrier operation was rough
in spots and an undercurrent of
agitation<was evident among per-
sonnel, but a senior airman com-
mented:
"Everyone is a little nervous the
first day of school."

-Associated Press

HOLD TALKS

British Foreign Secretary Michael Stewart met with Soviet Premier Kosygin in Moscow yesterday. He
expressed hope in a speech on Soviet television that an international peace conference could be con-
vened on the Viet Nam war. In Johnson City, Texas, Secretary of State Dean Rusk said that he was
open to Stewart's suggestion and willing to take part in any peace conference at any time.
PanesCalld o Uhold
la'm bia-Rhodes ia Peace:

~egro
e PP:
t
Jury Breaks
u
Pead'oelKSp
C
Im1prisou l elllt for b
.Ten Years Handed
Down by Jury
ANNISTON, Ala. (AP-A white h
male jury convicted a 25-year-old .l
white man. Hubert D a m o n
Strange, yesterday of second de-:
gree murder in the July slaying
of Willie Brewster, a Negro foun-b
dry worker, and set his penaltyn
at 10 years in prison.
It was the first murder convic-
tion of a white man for the slay-f
ing of a Negro in recent Alabamab
history. It came as a surprise amids
speculation that there would bes
a mistrial since the jury had re-
ported earlier it was deadlockedt
after more than seven hours of
deliberations. The verdict came
after more than nine hours.
On at least two other occa-
sions in modern history in thet
South, white persons were con-
victed in the slaying of Negroes
in cases linked to recent racialt
tension.
Florida Slaying
On March 23, 1963, Johnnie Mae
Chappel, 35, Negro, was shot and
killed in Jacksonville, Fla., dur-
ing racial remonstrations. A white;
man, J. W. Rich, 22, was sentenc-:
ed to 10 years for manslaughter.1
On Sept. 15, 1963, Virgil Ware,
13; Negro, was shot to death in
the aftermath of a Negro churcht
bombing which killed four girls in
Birmingham, Ala. Two white
youths were convicted of second
.degree nanslaughter and were
released on probation.
Strange was convicted of the
highway slaying of Brewster, 38.
who was shot fatally the night
of July 15 while driving alon at
highway near Anniston. The slay-
ing had not initially been consid-
ered racially related, but the pros-
ecution contended in the trial that
Strange and two white compan-
ions wantonly fired into Brew-
ster's car after leaving a segrega-
tion rally.
Acquittals
There have been four other kill-
ings linked to civil rights activi-
ties in Alabama this year. Trials
of two white men in Lowndes
County resulted in acquittals.
The conviction of Strange fol-
lowed a recent call by President 1
Johnson for legislation dealingt
dealing with all-white juries in
tian Leadership Conference, head-
ed by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
has begun a campaign, including
demonstrations in south Alabama,
protesting what the organization
called injustices to Negroes and
civil rights workers.
The jury foreman, typewriter
dealer B. L. Rigney, said the case
was decided on the evidence. "W
did not consider the race element
at all," he said.

Best Year
'tells Businessmen
To Avoid Inflation,
Back War Effort
JOHNSON CITY, Tex. (M) -
President Johnson predicted yes-
erday another record year for the
U.S. economy in 1966, called for
inited support of American forces
n Viet Nam, and repeated what
he has said many times:
"This nation is ready to -talk.
unconditionally, anywhere, with
peace as our agenda."
Speaking by telephone to a
losed meeting o fthe business'
ouncil in Washington, Johnson,
y clear implication, asked for
restraints on wages and prices.
Cooperation
Johnson said confidence is no
onger enough to keep the econ-
omy growing while avoiding in-
flation. There must also be co-
operation among business, labor
and the government, he said.
"Working together, they can
build and sustain an economy un-
matched in the history of man,"
he said.
"Thus with confidence in our
future, with cooperation across the
board, with common sense, un-
selfishness, and wisdom, business,
labor and government have sus-
tained the longest peacetime ex-
pansion on record-58 months of
unbroken prosperity."
58 Month Expansion
During this 58-month period,
Johnson said, "we have been able
to avoid inflation. Our prices have
remained more stable than those
of any industrial nation in the
world."
The 58-month period coincides
with the John F. Kennedy-John-
son Democratic administrations.
Johnson told the business coun-
cil, an unofficial government ad-
visory group which includes many
of the biggest names in American
business, "we have built a sense
of national confidence because we
have committed our government to
the well-being of every sector of
our economy.
"We are the government of all
America. We have made it clear
that we support a fair profit, a
fair wage and a fair price," he
said.
"We understand the complex
workings of our society. We know
that if one sector falters ,the oth-
ers will soon falter as well."
While forecasting another rec-
ord year for the economy, John-
son said he and his economic ad-
visers "are ever alert to danger
signs" and if any are sighted
"we will act accordingly."
Turning to the war in Viet Nam,
Johnson said "Your boys, our boys,
fight to preserve freedom and de-
fend justice in the rice paddies.
"They have put the, needs of
their government and their coun-
try ahead of their personal de-
sires and personal hopes. We must
pray, not only for their safe re-l
turn, but to unite behind them
as they unite among themselves.
TONIGHT !
DIXIELAND
by the fabulous
NEW WOLVERINE
JASS BAND
OLD HEIDELBERG
211 N. MAIN

LONDON OP)-Prime Minister little and see British troops sta-
Harold Wilson ordered an air tioned in the hills overlooking the;
strike force into Zambia after border dam. There they would be
President Kenneth Kaunda ac- ready to into action-as Wilson
cepted Britain's terms yesterday has pledged-if Rhodesia cut off
for the air defense of his Afri- the power to Zambia and its cop-
can republic bordering rebellious per mines.
Rhodesia. Despite British and Zambian

HILLEL
concluding SABBATH SERVICE
of the semester
TONIGHT, December 3 at 7:30 P.M.
Participants are Simon Benninga, Ed Adler,
Lynne Jacobs, Sima Juliar, and David Mandel.
The Hillel Choir directed by Michael Robbins
Joan Temkin at the organ
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 H ill Street All Are Welcc me

SALE
AT

fears, the white regime in Rho-
desia, which declared its inde-
pendence of Britain Nov. 11, has
insisted it has no intention of
shutting off the power.
Underlying stiff British condi-
tiai so aaji orc ns e a Z m-
bia is a major conslderation. .

ill 1
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irk
f''' III
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LAKE'S ART SHOP
Our entire stock of jewelry
and imported art work
is now being offered
at substantial discount.
Prices marked are retail,
so ask Mr. Lake about
the special sale price
on each piece.
LAKE'S ART SHOP
211 SOUTH STATE STREET

II

A fleet of Argosy and Beverley
transports carrying hundreds of
British men, guns, radar and oth-
er equipment is to take off from
Nairobi, Kenya, at first light to-
day for key Zambian airfields.

World News Roundup

Then, government officials re- By The Associated Press
ported, a squadron of Javelin jet JOHNSON CITY, Tex.-Secre-
fighters will follow-offsetting the tary of State Dean Rusk said
air power at the disposal of Prime after a conference with President
Minister Ian Smith's breakaway Johnson yesterday that the Unit-
regime in Rhodesia. ed States is willing to attend a
Cool Down conference on Southeast Asia of
Wilson told the House of Com- the sort proposed by British For-
mons: "The presence of the Roy- eign Secretary Michael Stewart.

Ph. 483-4680
i n
E uince Om CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
STEVE EDWARDG. ANN
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KARL MA.DEN,-TUESDAY WELD
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Box Office Open 6:30

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al Air Force will be a very i- Speaking briefly wit
portant factor in helping to cool at Bergstrom Air Forc
down the situation." Austin, Rusk was ask(
He said .conditions in central tion to Stewart's propc
Africa were "critical and explo- cow yesterday.
sive." "We have indicate(
In Lusaka, the Zambian capital, time that we will be w
Commonwealth Relations Secre- tend a conference or
tary Arthur Bottomley still was Asia or any part of it,'
tussling with Kaunda and his Rusk said more ma
ministers over conditions under about Stewart's propos
which a British ground force could ter of days.
be provided.-- --- ---- -
Bottomley in Charge
Sources said Bottomley is in-f
sisting Britain must have control
of all ground forces-even those
foreign international troops which
may be sent by other African
states-and that may be deploy-
ed in defense of Zambia againstOp
white-ruled Rhodesia. (IOp e
A dispatch from Lusaka quoted
informed sources as saying they
believe Kaunda still is insisting
that British ti'oops take over the
vital power installations at the
Kariba Dam on the Rhodesian
side of the border.
A diplomatic source in Lusaka

th newsmen
e Base near

MIAMI, Fla.-The second plane
bearing refugees from Cuba arriv-'
ed in Miami shortly after 3 p.m.
yesterday.
Between 100 and 200 exiles from
Fidel Castro's regime were on
hand to greet their newly arriv-
ed compatriots.
A list distributed prior to the
plane's arrival showed 94 passen-
gers aboard. Seventy-five came on
the first plane Wednesday.
As was the case with the inau.-
gural flight, the second plane was
several hours late. It had been
due around 10:30 i nthe morning.
The government plans to re-
settle nearly all the new arrivals
outside the Miami area and many
of those who first came have al-
ready left to join relatives inI
other parts of the country. '

;;:

Read and Use Daily Classified Ads

f U I ,4 g..5
ning Friday, December 3... 7:00 P.M.
Rackham Galleries
STUDENT FILMS at 7 and 9
Refreshments

-.

The University Musical Society
Presents

!', II

!!saidU fl.uUUa mlay 'agree to give 'a

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
INTERNATIONAL DINNER
(op. 2)
Friday, Dec. 3... 6:00 P.M.
Please call 662-5189 for reservation

i

GENERAL PUBLIC INVITED
} EA RLY-____________-----x-
GET AN EARLY START
on your
CHRISTMAS GIFT LIST
use
r W Mi4 anH LDaYily
WIN'TER HOLIDAY

..

-J
(HANDEL
in Hill Auditorium
FRIDAY, DEC. 3, 8:30
SATURDAY, DEC. 4, 8:30
SUNDAY, DEC. 5, 2:30

The HILLEL Foundation is pleased to call attention
to a public lecture
sponsored by theoCENTER for RUSSIAN STUDIES
on

University Choral Union

(340 voices)

and Soloists

F jMembers of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra
'' Lester McCov. Conductor

III

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