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December 02, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-12-02

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THURSDAY, DECEMBER 2, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE;

THURSDAY. DECEMBER 2,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.A 1 ] ' 1 Tflit f.

'.1

CUNY

Resignations

Stir

Power,

Financial

By MARY LYONS
Collegiate Press Service
NEW YORK-Another major
university system, this time on the
east coast, has run into trouble.
Four key administrators of the
City University of New York are
standing firm on the resignations
they sent to the city's Board of
Education two weeks ago.
The four-City University Chan-
cellor Albert Bowker, Dean of
Studies Harry Levy, President
John J. Meng of Hunter College,
and President Harry D. Gideonse
of Brooklyn College - resigned
after the Board of Higher Educa-
tion rebuked the administrators of
the university for a lack of "un-
divided fealty." In their letters
of resignation, both Meng and
Gideonse took specific exception
to the term "fealty," Gideonse
Britisi

calling it a "medieval concept."I
Bowker wrote that his resignation,
was caused by the board's "lack
of confidence" in him.
The immediate cause of the res-
ignations was a dispute over free
tuition. Since its inception as a
Free Academy, over 100 years ago,
the City University has maintain-
ed a no-tuition policy. On Nov. 6,
however, President Meng disclosed
a program in which combined
state and city scholarship aid
would provide free education
"within the framework of a tui-
tion structure."
The tuition plan, which had
the approval of the Administrative
Council of the eleven college pres-
idents and chancellor, was ex-
plained as a device for channeling
more state funds into the City
'University. Bowker reiterated
Meng's assurances that the stu-

dent would not pay any of the| first, he had allowed the tuition cides policy within the City Uni- over
$400 tuition charge. proposal to become public before versity? Is the BHE restricting its auth
Reaction to the shadow tuition the board had passed on it; and administrators' freedom too much? versi
proposal was unfavorable enough second, he planned to go over the Or, are the administrators invad- hisI
to force its withdrawal by the board's head to the state legisla- ing the board's legitimate sphere of fr
Administrative Council on Nov. 15. ture with the proposal if it were of action? So
Student leaders threatened picket rejected by the BHE. , New York City's eleven public ques
lines and boycotts, held emergency: Thus, the board's rebuke. colleges did not become a formal powe
planning sessions and met with In response to public pressure, university system until 1961, when thet
Chancellor Bowker. BHE chair- however, the board softened its state legislation established the CUN
man Gustave G. Rosenberg ex- rebuke somewhat and issued a City University of New York. arer
pressed "shock" at the surprise plea for the four administrators to Since that time, according to Pres- secor
plan. remain at their posts. To date, the idents Meng and Gideonse,e no line
Retraction of the plan, how- officials have not indicated any adequate definition of the role ment
ever, did not satisfy the BHE. The intention of doing so. of the Administrative CouncilI ferer
21-memeber board, which acts as Out of the confusion of events vis-a-vis the BHE has been ocrit
a policy-making board of trustees, and comments, charges and coun- formulated. pyra
has always jealously guarded its ter charges, two basic issues In his letter of resignation, A
authority. emerge: decision-making authority Meng referred to the "develop- batti
Although Chancellor Bowker within the university, and the ments of the past two weeks" as is m
called his plan "a recommenda- problem of financing. merely "the most public episodes diate
tion," the board apparently felt The immediate issue, pointed up in a three-and-a-half year con- of fi
that he had overstepped the limits by the board-administrators rift, flict between board and council corol
of his position in two respects: is one of internal power: who de-t

the proper allocation of
ority within the City Uni-
ty." Gideonse, in reaffirming
resignation, spoke of "years
rustrations."
me observers consider the
tion of internal division of
er crucial because it will affect
type of educator attracted to
Y. First-rate administrators
not likely to be satisfied with
nd-rate authority. Where the
between policy and manage-
t is drawn may make the dif-
nce between quality and medi-
y at the top of the university
mid.
second basic issue in the
e at CUNY goes deeper and
ore complex than the imme-
conflict. It is the question
nances, and in New York the
lary to that question is the

extent of state control over the
City University system.
New York City faces critical
fiscal problems at present. These
problems directly affect allocation
for public higher education. Con-
fronted with drastically increasing
enrollment (its total enrollment
stands at over 100,000 now), the
City University finds itself fi-
nancially embarrassed, while at-
tempting to expand, to meet short-
ages in undergraduate facilities,
.and to support a very young
graduate program, CUNY is not
completeley certain whether its
next dollar is coming-never mind
where it is coming from.

Issues
tention that "we have absolutely
no desire to take over this institu-
tion," the state appears very much
interested in the City University
of New York. During the past two
weeks, there were at least three
indications of such interest:
-In the early stages of the
tuition dispute, Rockefeller ad-
vanced a plan for the construction
of five State University colleges,
one in each borough of New York'
City.
-Just minutes before the four
administrators' resignations were
released, the State Education
Commissioner sent the BHE a
telegram demanding "a full re-
port" to the Board of Regents,
which controls all public educa-
tion in the state.
-The Joint Legislative Com-
mittee on Higher Education, a
committee of the state legislature,
announced that it will conduct an
investigation into the BHE-
Administrative Council dispute.
Both issues-internal authority
and financing of the university-
have yet to be resolved, and their
resolution will determine the fu-
ture of the City University.

1
i
1
i

To Enter

Zambi*

a,
ia,

world News Roundup

For years, despite various pres-
sures, the City University has
managed to preserve its autonomy.
The strain is mounting, however,
and proposals for some form of
state control are rising. A major
reason why the BHE reprimanded
its administrators so severely was a
their fear that the tuition pro-
posal, with its accompanying call
for an increase in state aid, pro-
vided an opening for state con-I
trol.
Despite Gov. Rockefeller's con-I

'Pu Pressure on Rhodes

U.S. ARMY ENGINEER helps driver of self-propelled 30-ton eight-inch howitzer maneuv
raft after crossing South Viet Nam's Song River in Combat Zone D. The gun will be stat
miles north of Saigon with the Ist Infantry Division.
VIET NAM FIGURES RELEASED:
* Government Casualties Nea
High After Plantation Atta
SAIGON (W--Combat casualtiesx The latest statistics on the toll and propaganda pan
in the South Vietnamese armed of a war that Defense Secretary North Viet Nam.
forces soared to 1,505 last week, Robert S. McNamara says "will American losses Nov.
largely as a result of the Viet be a long road ahead" came out markedly less than in
Cong's destruction of the 7th In- on a day of relatively light ground ous week, though som(
fantry Regiment, a U.S. military action. visers were cut down
spokesman announced yesterday. U.S. planes loosed both bombs Vietnamese infantrym
--_ - - - --- - -----losing battle Saturdas
- 1 abandoned Michelin ru
tation 45 miles northw(
The University of M ichigan The U.S. toll was 40
wounded and 5 missing.
Gilbert and Sullivan Society 11 South Viet Nam lost
-the government's se
Present est toll of the wvar. Ir
Presents861 were wounded and
ins
However, the spokesm
P aeP je Viet Cong were ki
U.S. and government
favorable ratio of 3-1.

:.Wilson vows~
..,.... F ight for
Electricity
Control of Troops Not
Yet Agreed On; Keep'
Dail Power Flowing
LONDON W) - Britain set up
forces yesterday to operate with-
in reach of Rhodesia and warned
rebellious Rhodesian leaders it will
fight, if necessary, to defend
neighboring Zambia's power sup-
plies.
Zambian President Kenneth
Kaunda gave Britain the all-clear
Ter ff a to move air units into. Zambia.
er off a Government informants reported!,
ioned 4a British planes and airmen will fly
in today.
The sources said the Zambian
and British governments have not
yet reached agreement on the
terms under which a battalion of
ground forces will move into Zam-
14 bia.
Control of Troops
The issue dividing Kaunda and,
C British Prime Minister Harold
kilson at the moment is under-
stood to center on the question of,
the control of these British troops.
rphlets on Wilson wants command to remain
British, while Kaunda is believed
21-27 were to want at least a share in the
the previ- command structure.
e U.S. ad- In a solemn. and silent House of
with the Commons, Prime Minister Harold
en in their Wilson also announced that Brit-
.y on theain is tightening the screw of eco-
est of plSai- nomic and fiscal sanctions to bring
est o about a "quick and sharp" end of
Prime Minister Ian Smith's break-
killed, 117 away Rhodesian regime.1
Blunt Warning
459 killed Wilson addressed this blunt.
cond high- warning to Smith's government,
ni addition, which, he claimed, has been. black-
S185 i mailing successive British govern-
ments with threats to cut off
nan said 1,- power supplies to Zambia from the
lled, giving giant Kariba Dam:
troops a "If he (Smith) uses his illegi-
timate control over this interna-
- tional project, the Kariba Dam.
to destroy the economy of Zambia
4 and indeed very seriously disrupt
our own economy, we cannot stand
idly by.
"If that did mean a limited
military operation-we should be
prepared to take that operation."
Smith has insisted repeatedly
that Rhodesia has no intention of
shutting off power to the copper;
mines and industries of Zambia.
The Kariba Dam lies across the
Zambezi River on the Zambian-
Rhodesian frontier, but the power
:? plant is inside Rhodesia.

By The Associated Press requested by the Justice Depart-
WASHINGTON-Secetayfment, the court said further in-
State Dean Rusk said yesterday terference with the civil rights of
the United States must keep its Bogalusa Negroes would not be
commitments in Viet Nam to ward tolerated.
off the danger of a disastrous mis- The three-judge opinion listed
calculation on the other side. as defendants the original Knights
administration of the Ku Klux Klan, "its dummy;
Rusk defended front, the anti-Communist Chris-
policies at one of the final ses- tian Association," and 38 individ-
sions of the White House Confer- uals, including the top Klan offi-
ence on International Cooperation, cials at Bogalusa.
which had heard some calls for The injunction is the second is-
changes, -especially on the emo- su
tionpackd sujectof te cotin- ed by federal courts in recent
tio-pakedsubectof he ontn-months in an effort to aid civil
ued ombng f Nrth ietNai. rights demonstrators at Bogalusa,
TOKYO-Red China charged a papermill town of 25,000 persons
U.S. planes attacked Chinese fish- 70 miles north of New Orleans.
ing boats twice last month on the The earlier order directs police of-
high seas killing two and injur- ficials to provide adequate protec-
ing seven fishermen. tion to peaceful Negro demonstra-

BARTON rS
NEWYORK.LUGANO. SWITZERLAND
sweet
pre-holiday
specials
SAVE 50¢-MINIATURE
FRUIT CAKES:
Juicy cherries, pineapple,
pecans and almonds in lus-
cious little rum-flavored
cakes, 15 to a box, reg.
$2.98, NOW $2.48.

A Peking broadcast also said;
the Communist Chinese depart-
ments concerned voiced the
"strongest protest" to the U.S.
government.
The New China News Agency,
in a broadcast dispatch, said it
learned the alleged attacks took'
place in the Gulf of Tonkin.
* * .
MIAMI-A Pan American World
Airways charter plane flew into
Miami yesterday with 82 refugees
from Communist Cuba, kicking off
an airlift that could go on for
years if Prime Minister Fidel Cas-
tro sticks to his promise to let
his people go.I
The plane reached Miami Inter-
national Airport from Veradero,
Cuba, at 1:59 p.m., hours late+
because of mechanical trouble and
red tape.
The Cuban Refugee Center said
only 20 of the new arrivals would
remain in the Miami area, which
already has some 70,000 exiles;
from the Castro regime.
NEW ORLEANS - A federal
court ordered Ku Klux Klansmen
yesterday to halt "acts of terror'
and intimidation" aimed at pre-
serving white supremacy in Bo-'
galusa, La.
In a strongly worded injunction
Ph. 483-4680
Entcaxce NCARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING
4
STEVE EDWARDG. ANN-
ilcOUEEN ROBINSON-MARGRET
KAR[ MALDEN-Tu\ESDAYWEL[
m A MARTiN PANSOKOF
PRDOUCTION
mMETROCOLOR
PLUS!
MICKEY SPILLANE
"THE GIRL HUNTERS"
FREE CAR HEATERS
Box Office Open 6:30

tors.

t

mllw

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,

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TODAY ONLY
1:30 4:30 8 P.M.
M ARCOT
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NUREYEV
AN EVENINGWITH
HE R@YA
~BALLETX
l u ~( Syphde.LeCorsair
La Veae Aurora'sWedding)
3130 starrng DA VID B LAI RI
Directed by Anthony Asquith
and Anthony Havelock-Allan
A B.H.E. Production
A Sigma III Release
1:30 Show is $1.50
4:30 at $1.00-8 P.M. at $2.25

SAVE 50¢-DELICIOUS
MINIATURE CHOCOLATES:
106 pieces of Barton's Con-
tinental Chocolates. Fruits,
nuts, crunches, cordials,
cremes, in holiday gift box,
1 lb. 5 oz. reg. $2.98, NOW
$2.48. Double size-2 lbs.
10 oz.--reg. $5.96, NOW
ONLY $4.96.

SAVE 40 -TANGY FRUIT-FILLED HARD CANDY:
Real fruits in paper-thin hard candy shells. Apricot, pine.
apple, raspberry, orange, lemon, lime. 2 delicious pounds,
reg. $2.19, NOW $1.79.
Till December 1st only! (What's more, we'll take atderm
at these prices through Decemberl1st. and make delivery
any time you name before Christmas.)
307-309 S. State Street

TOMORROW ONLY
you will have anz opportunity to brows through
hundreds of original lithographs, etchings,
Qwoodcuts and seriagraphs
QRAPHICA GALLERY.
of Detroit
presents part of its diverse collection of graphic art from the master
to the contemporary printmaker at varying prices.
The perfect gift.
Bell Tower Motel
Friday, December 3 300 S. Thayer
10 A.M.-9 P.M. Across from Hill Auditorium
Room 202

Nov. 30, Dec. 1-4
Tickets on Sale 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
Dec. 2-4-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Weid. and Thurs. Performances-$1.50
Fri. and Sat. Performances--$2.00
Fri. and Sat. night and Sat. matinee SOLD OUT
TONIGHT at 7 and _
Starring
* - JAMES MASON I
Ii fP~ T KlrWTC Kl

DIAL 662-626
.THI :..
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MACHINE

;.It has a>.
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- . - -
AMERICAN
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k~. A4
A~TE'U

POTTERS GUILD'
CHRISTMAS SALE
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 5
201 H ill St.
10 A.M.--3 P.M.
E- - - -----

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Department of Speech
present
HENRY VI
Last Complete Cycle Begins Tonight
Part 1-Dec. 2
Part 2-Dec. 3
Part 3-Dec. 5 (mat.)

I

X

HILLEL

concluding SABBATH SERVICE

II

11

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