100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DA TLY

PAM RRVEN

THE MI.I.A a.lY . .Q.7 . - ....,Jd V£4.

rtfurru lC, V Glv

114.

Clay

Pommels

Helpless

Patterson

II

TKO

LAS VEGAS (P)-Cassius Clay
tortured a dead-game Floyd Pat-
terson unmercifully and handed+
the ex-champion a fierce beating
last night to score a technical
knockout in 2:18 of the 12th round
of his second heavyweight title
defense.
Referee Harry Krause finally
stopped the slaughter while Pat-,
terson wobbled back from an-
other barrage of punches. But
Floyd protested weakly through
swollen lips.
Clay, who prefers to be known
by his Black Muslim name of
Muhammad All, had Patterson on
the deck in the sixth round. When
Clay failed to go to a neutral
corner, the referee stopped the
count at five and waited four
more seconds for Clay to get in
the corner.
Patterson finally got up wobbly
at the count of nine. That was
the only knockdown.
The Dancer
Cassius did nothing but dance
and move in the first round. After
that, he appeared to be toying
with Floyd, who was trying to be-
come the first man ever to win
4 the title three times.
Time after time Buster Watson,
his trainer, picked Patterson up
bodily at the end of a ground as if
to . stretch Floyd's aching back
muscles.
The crowd of some 8300 cheer-
ed Patterson and booed the champ
* throughout the night. They dis-
agreed with the referee's decision
to end it-but it was a humane
move by a competent official.
Several Clay partisans tried to
charge into the ring at the end
only to be ejected by a posse of
police officers after a struggle.
Mean Jabs
Clay flicked that stinging jab

into Patterson's face all night
long, raising lumps around both
of his eyes. It seemed impossible
that Patterson could continue but,
just when it appeared he must
go, Clay backed off and started
jabbing and moving again.
Referee Krause warned Clay
several times about talking to his
opponent, yelling "stop the chat-
ter", at the super-confident cham-
pion time and again..
"I was so surprised he could
take so many punches," Clay said
after the fight. "I dare any man
to take what he took. I am a
heavyweight Ray Robinson."
Clay fought with his hands
down at his side, flicking the jab,
doubling up with the hook and oc-
casionally driving home the right
to the head.
Cassius would drop his hands
and just ease his head out of the
way of Patterson's wild shots.
Floyd, painfully slow in con-
trast to the quick moves of Clay,
kept plugging along throwing
punches but landing most of them
on thin air.
Fan Favorite
The live crowd at the Conven-
tion Center and the thousands
who watched on the closed circuit
telecast had made Patterson the
sentimental favorite, but the odds-
makers in this garish gambling
town had Clay a 13-5 choice.
"I don't want to make any ex-
cuses but I want to say to 'my
millions df fans that I trained
hard," Patterson said. "I did ev-
erything I could to win it for my
fans all over the country.
"None of my plans worked. May-
be even without the back they
wouldn't have worked."
Asked about his back:
"I've had trouble with my back
since 1954. A specialist told me

Cassius Bound to Terrell Fight

LAS VEGAS (P-Both heavy-
weight champion Cassius Clay
and challenger Floyd Patterson
signed $50,000 bond agreements
that the winner of their title
fight last night would meet Er-
nie Terrell within six months, the
president of the World Boxing
Association, said Sunday.
Terrell Non-Committal
Jim Deskin, president of the
WBA and executive secretary of
the Nevada Athletic Commission,
said, however, that Terrell has
not posted such a bond yet, al-
though he had been requested to
do so.
Terrell, of Chicago, is the
WBA's heavyweight champion, but
the Clay-Patterson fight still was
billed as for the world title.
Deskin said that both Clay and
Patterson have stated there is
not a return bout contract or
agreement.
'Clean' Contract
The WBA head also said that
there is a stipulation in the bond
agreement that says that both
Patterson and Clay, as well as the
WBA, must be satisfied that any
manager, trainer or any person or
firm or corporation having any
property interest in Terrell must
be free of any underworld con-
tacts.
The California Athletic Com-
mission released a statement the

other day urging all boxing or-
ganizations to refrain from unde-
sirable influences.
Terrell says he is his own man-
ager.
Fighters Healthy
Deskin made his announcement
after Dr. Donald Romeo, chief
medical examiner of the Nevada
commission, said both fighters
were in tip top shape. He exam-I
ined both Sunday. He said the
fighters' hands were strong.
Dr. Romeo said Patterson's
outlook was "much brighter this
time" than it was before his sec-
ond fight with Sonny Liston here
28 months ago. Liston knocked out
Patterson in the first round for
the second straight time.
Floyd Confident
Patterson ,at a final prefight
news conference, said he felt in

"fine mental and physical condi-
tion."
He repeated that he felt he was
"going to win" and again denied
reports that opposition camp -
meaning Clay's camp-had caused.
him any difficulty.
No Friction
"I've had no difficulty with the
opposition camp," said Patter-
son. "I stressed in an interview the
other day that I had difficulty
in my own camp."
He was then asked again about
his condition, and he patiently
said that he was in great shape
and looked forward to beating
Clay.
Clay, who has been having news
conferences at least twice a day,
left the stage to Patterson on the
final day, undoubtedly saving him-
self for the weigh-in.

Sorry, Floyd, "The Greatest" May Be Just That

rest was the best thing for it but
it was never this bad before. There
is a very strong possibility I may
quit."
After the fiasco in Lewiston,
Maine, last May 25 when Sonny
Liston went out quickly from a
still debated Clay punch, the
crowd reacted favorably to Pat-
terson's game stand. It must have
won him friends from coast to
coast and in the British Isles
where the Early Bird satellite
beamed the show into the wee
morning hours.
. No Rabbit
The man Clay had derided as
"the rabbit" turned out to be a
battler with the heart of a lion.
Although beaten and soundly
whipped, Patterson did much to
erase the memory of those two.
shocking one-round knockouts at
the hands of Liston. The second

of those happened in this very
ring, July 22, 1963.
It was the 22nd straight victory
for the unbeaten Clay, who came
into the pros in 1960 as an Olym-
pic champion. This was the fourth
time the 30-year-old Patterson
had been stopped in a career
record of 43-5.
Clay, a towering 6-foot-3, had
three inches in height and eight
inches in reach on Patterson. The
champ, who scaled 210 pounds,
also had a 13-pound weight edge
on Patterson, who weighed 197.
The Louisville Lip, who won the
title on a stunning upset over Lis-
ton in Miami Beach, Fla., in 1964,
made all the moves a champion is
supposed to have. He danced, jab-
bed, turned southpaw on occasion
and completely dominated this
fight.
On the Associated Press score-
card, Patterson was given only one
round, the first, in which Clay did
nothing but prance clockwise and
move in and out of range like a

gandy dancer.
All three officials had Clay a
lop-sided winner. Judge Harold'
Buck saw it 54-46, judge Bill
Stremmel 54-43 and r e f e r e e
Krause 53-46. The referee gave
Patterson the first and the 11th.
At the end of the 10th round
with Patterson obviously in trou-
ble in his corner, the referee call-
ed for a doctor. He told Nevada
State Athletic Commission offi-
cials he wanted the commission
physician, Dr. Donald Romeo, to
examine the beaten fighter after
the next round.

wmwwmw
I

SPOTTED?
Don't let a spotted finish ruin the looks of your car. We
can restore the finish to its original beauty. If your car
needs painting or body work, our skilled craftsmen can
do a first rate job in the shortest time. Stop in today and
ask for a free estimate.
O-L-D-S-M-O-B--L-E
YKoitrene MARK 3M:
USED CARS

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
COME TO THE TUESDAY
FOUR O'CLOCK DATE AT THE GUILD!
NO SPEECHES, NO SEMINARS,
NO SCHEDULED ANYTHING!
CONVERSATION-REFRESHMENTS

HOCKEY PREVIEW:
SOffense To Key Good Season

r

mL

Join the Lloyd Graff
Fan Club

By DAVE WEIR
"If we are going to win this
season, we will have to be able to
skate well both ways," said hockey
coach- Al Renfrew yesterday.
Coach Renfrew was referring to
the "dual function" of hockey for-
wards: to score goals, and to skate
back quickly and attempt to steal
the puck when the opposition has
possession.
Spearheading s u c h offensive
maneuvers this year for the hockey
team, which opens its season Fri-
day against Western Ontario, will
be All-American Mel Wakabaya-
shi.
Wakabayashi, t h e Canadian -
born center who led the WCHA in,

recent practice session. "He has
exceptionally deceptive moves and
gets off to a quick start with the
puck."
Forwards Barry MacDonald and
Bob Baird are expected to skate
on either side of Wakabayashi.
MacDonald, a senior, is making
the switch to right wing this sea-
son after two years as a defense-
man. Left-winger Baird, with a
half a year of offensive experience
behind him, is a good "two-way
player,"
Two other lines are shaping up,
as coach Renfrew attempts to
achieve the balanced three line
attack which he has used for the
past few years.
One line boasts sophomore
Bruce Koviak at center flanked by
returning lettermen Mike Martilla
and Dean Lucier. Renfrew expects
this line to be "an excellent check-
ing line." Koviak gained his ex-
perience playing with the Junior
Red Wings in Detroit and with
last year's frosh team. Martilla
and Lucier are juniors returning
from last year's squad, which, av-
eraged almost four and a half
goals per game.
The third line preparing for
Friday's opener has senior Bob
Ferguson at left wing. With plenty
of experience behind him, Fergu-
son, one of the best skaters on the
team, could be a real offensive
threat. Playing at center on this
line will be junior Bob Boysen,
noted for his hard shot. Newcomer

Len Martilla, Mike's brother, is
expected to play right wing on
the third line.,
Coach Renfrew says that these
lines are not final, and are still
subject to change. "We will have
to wait until the boys work under
game conditions before we can
make a more definite decision as
to who will play on what line. If
these lines don't work out so well,
some of the other players may get
a chance to move up."
Three forwards who have been
working out together recently are
letter-winner Dan Walter and
sophs Ray Demurge and Ron
Ullyot. In Renfrew's words, these
three are "only a step behind the
starters, if that. Any one of them
could move onto a starting line in
the future. The two sophomores,
Demurge and Ulloyt, both have
good hockey backgrounds; Ray
played with the Junior Red Wings
and Ron saw action with a Fort
Wayne, Ind., team."
On the overall offensive outlook,
coach Renfrew had this to say,
"We'll have to wait until after a
few games before we can tell how
effective our offense really is. But
so far, the boys have worked and
skated hard, and the results could
be very gratifying."

A.J.
STENOGRAPHIC
SERVICES
308 Municipal Court
Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan
DISCOUNTS TO STUDENTS
on theses, term papers, etc.
All public stenographic
and secretarial services.
FREE PICKUP AND
DELIVERY
Angie Jones, 665-3786

11

-I

Pre-Holiday Gift Suggestions
From DISCOUNT RECORDS

Europe for $100
Switzerland - A do-it-yourself
summer in Europe is now avail-
able. The new plan makes a trip
to Europe, including transporta-
tion, possible for less than $100.
A complete do-it-yourself pro-
spectus including instructions,
money saving tips and a large
selection of job opportunities
along with discount tours and
application forms may be ob-
tained by writing to Dept. X, In-
ternational Travel Est., 68 Her-
rengasse, Vaduz, Liechtenstein
(Switzerland) enclosing $1 with
your inquiry to cover the cost of
the material, overseas handling
and air mail postage.

CHRISTMAS RECC
COLUMBIA- CAPITOL-

ANDY WILLIAMS
PHILADELPHIA ORCH
JOHNNY MATHIS
MORMON CHOIR
RAY CONNIFF
LEONARD BERNSTEIN
NORMAN LUBOFF
CARL WEINRICH
E. POWER BIGGS

FRANK SINATRA
NAT KING COLE
HOLLYWOOD BOWL
KINGSTON TRIO
ROGER WAGNER
FRED WARING
BEACH BOYS
ERNIE FORD
JACKIE GLEASON

)RDS
RCA VICTOR-
HARRY BELAFONTE
ROBERT SHAW
PERRY COMO
BOSTON POPS
CHET ATKINS
MARIAN ANDERSON
MARIO LANZA
JOHN GARY
GEORGE B. SHEA
LORNE GREENE

THIS WEEK ONLY
SPECIAL
WESTMI NSTER,
FOLK WAYS
VERVE

SOMERSET & STEREO FIDELITY
Featuring the 101 Strings

SOUL OF SPAIN
GYPSY CAMPFIRES
VICTOR HERBERT
SOUTH AMERICA
PORGY AND BESS
AMERICAN WALTZES
WORLD'S GREAT
STANDARDS

GLORY OF
CHRISTMAS
EAST OF SUEZ
ITALIAN HITS
RUSSIAN FIREWORKS
THE RIVIERAS
A NIGHT IN
VIENNA

SOUL OF MEXICO
HAWAIIAN PARADISE
RUDOLF FR1ML
RHAPSODY
SHOW HITS
SILVER SCREEN
BRIDAL BOUQUET
PLAY THE BLUES

I4
3 09
3 71

Choose
F rom
,JAZZ
CLASSICS
HUMOR
FOLK
CHILDREN'S

I

SPECIAL AT 99c-MONO/STEREO
Price increases to $1.98 after Jan. 1st

AL RENFREW
scoring last season, is back to ter-
rorize the opposing goalies in the
league. He was named captain of
the Wolverines last spring, and
will center the first-string line. To
complement his. offensive prowess,
Wakabayashi combines outstand-
ing skating and checking abilities
which make him one of the best
forwards in the league with re-
spect to the defensive function.
"I expect Mel to have another
fine year," said Renfrew after a

Selected
RIVERSIDE
PRESTIGE
ATLANTIC

JAZZ
LP's

BARGAIN RECORDS

--

I

STUDGNT BOOK SGRVIC
1215 S. University
PRINTS
STUDY GUIDES
FREE BLUEBOOKS

Il

I

CANNONBALL ADDERLEY-
AFRICAN WALTZ
BILL EVANS-WALTZ FOR DEBBY
THELONIOUS MONK-5 x 5.
ART FARMER-FARMER'S MARKET
BILL EVANS & JIM HALL-
INTERACTION
MILT JACKSON-BALLADS AND BLUES
CANNONBALL ADDERLEY-
JAZZ WORKSHOP REVISITED
JOHN COLTRANE-MATING CALL
THELONIOUS MONK-MONK'S MUSIC
AND MORE GREAT JAZZ LP's
POPULAR RECORDS
CURRENT 45's
OLDIE 45's LP's-by
BEATLES
KI NGSMEN
SUPREMES
FOUR TOPS
ROLLING STONES

VOX
$198 MONO or STEREO
NI ELSEN-Symphony No. 2
BRUCKNER-Symphony No. 6
BEETHOVEN-Emperor
Concerto
BACH-Einfesteburg
MOZART-Horn Concerti
CHOPIN-Piano Concerto 1
SCHUBERT-Moments
Musicaux
BARTOK-Piano Concerti
2&3
BIRD FANCIERS DELIGHT
HANDEL-Flute Sonatas
ROSS I N I-Overtures
VIVALDI-Bassoon Concerti
VIVALDI-Gloria
SCHUBERT-Trout Quintet
BRAHMS-Hungarian Dances
HAYDN-Flute Concerto
FRANCK-Symphony in D
AND MORE

NONESUCH
$239 MONO or STEREO
RENAISSANCE CHORAL
MUSIC FOR CHRISTMAS
STRAVINSKY-Rite of Spring
SCARLATTI-Sonatas
BAROQUE TRUMPET
MOZART-Two Piano
Concerti
MONTEVERDI-Il Ballo Dell
Ingrate
BACH-Magnificat
VIVALDI-Four Seasons
HTYDN-Sym. 6, 7, 8
RAVEL & DEBUSSY-Quartets
BACH-Harpsichord Concerti
VIVALDI-Horn & Guitar
Concerti
HANDEL-Dettingen Te Deum
HAYDN-Organ Concerto
STOELZEL-Trumpet Concerti
AND MORE

VICTROLA
249298
MONO STEREO
BRAHMS-Piano Concerto 2
STRAVINSKY-Fire Bird
BARTOK-Concerto for
Orchestra
PROKOFI EF--Cinderella
BEETHOVEN-Sym. No. 7
MENDELSSOHN & BRUCH-
Violin Concerti
ELGAR-Enigma Variations
RACHMAN I NOFF-Symphony
No.6
DEBUSSY-La Mer
GRI EG-Piano Concerto
LEHAR PROGRAM
BRAHMS-Violin Concerto
BRAHMS-Symphony No. 2
DELIBES-Sylvia and
Coppelia Excerpts
AND MORE

11

Yes, My Dear
There will be

A VERY SPECIAL GIFT SUGGESTION
-JOHN FITZGERALD KENNEDY-
. .As We Remember Him
A TWO-RECORD SET AND ILLUSTRATED BOOK
A UNIQUE BIOGRAPHY
FROM CHILDHOOD TO THE WHITE HOUSE

11

I .r-,, - ea- , o -, . ,..-. r w - W -~r I I I

11 tu ilII I. NI L111 *g: it 11

U

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan