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November 18, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1965'

TUC MICHIGAN HAII.V

-a -- ---.

..RY," NOVEMBR..8,15uI.LaTafl A1t i

PAGE SEVEN

q

lave 1
By DAN OKRENT
"There are plenty of advantages
I've enjoyed from being on the
team. People know me, I meet
people, I get good summer jobs
from various alumni. Now, if I
had come to this University as a,
you know, a person... yd
With these'words, Floyd Day
is making a grave error. Floyd,
hardly a possessor of notoriety as
a member of the football squad's
"Redshirts" (reserves), can truly
be considered, like it or not, a
person. Bigger than his 6'2", 202
pounds sound, he is one of the
last of the good guys.
Every football team, according
' to the PR men, at least, has their
Carl Ward, Bill Yearby, or Jack
Clancy. Concurrently, every team
has more than their share of Floyd
Days. But you never hear about
the latter.
The Club
Floyd Day is one of the many
athletes who populate the small
type on your roster. The members
of this hardly select "club" par-
ticipate in the daily practices,
watch the weekly films, listen to
the halftime harangues from the
emotion-wrought coaching staff,,
,nd take Astro 111. From there,

ou Ever Heard of Floyd Day?

Finalists Decided in Wrestling

the similarities between the
"Blues" and the "Reds" end. The
Blues get to play.
Floyd Day is a senior in the
College of Engineering, a former

All-Stater from the womb of mod-
ern-day football, Canton, Ohio.
Taught under the wing of Mc-
Kinley High Coach Pete Ankeny,
Floyd was actively recruited by
over forty colleges from all over
the country. After narrowing down
his list to Princeton, Army and
Michigan, he decided to come to
Ann Arbor. "I wanted to play for
a Big Ten school," he says, "but
I wanted an education, too."
Quarter Hour
Since then, Floyd Day has play-
ed an aggregate total of 15 min-
utes of varsity action in three
years. But, remarkably, bitter he's
not. "When I came here, I knew
it wouldn't be easy. I've tried to
make the 'big time,' and whether
I've succeeded is questionable. But
it was my risk." This is Floyd
Day's explanation; his rationale
is equally plausible. "I also don't
mind getting a good education for
free, either." Under Big Ten rules,
all players, regardless of grid time
logged, have the right to retain
any scholarship extended as a
freshman as long as he goes to
practices and doesn't quit the
team. Sort of like tenure.
But Floyd does not go to prac-
tices just because of the scholar-
ship. He also sincerely enjoys be-
ing on the team. "I like practice. It
gives me some chance for action,
and just being a member of the
team offers the opportunity for
strong, worthwhile friendships.
Besides these factors, we've got

as good a bunch of coaches as
you'll find anywhere." And these
coaches think highly of Floyd.
"Floyd Day has been a real
fine member of the team. In his
role as leader of the demonstration
defense, he is a key factor in
keeping our team going." In this
manner, Bump Elliott gives credit
to Floyd for one of the most
thankless tasks of the football re-
serve.
Movie Star
The "demonstration defense" is
the team composed of those who,
like Floyd, virtually serve as block-
ing dummies for the offensive
starters. Week in, week out,
middle-guard Day serves as Dick
Butkus, "Mad-Dog" O'Billovich,
Harold Lucas, Ike Kelley, or who-
ever will anchor the following Sa-
turday's opponent's defense. And
trying to be Harold Lucas while
attempting to tackle Dave Fisher
isn't easy.
Here is where Floyd emits his
loudest gripe. Because of his purely
stand-in function and the value
of the likes of Fisher, Ward, Gab-
ler and Company, he is not allowed
to hit like a football player likes
to hit. Thus, he must wait until
Mondays, when the fourth string
and below scrimmage the fresh-
men.
Victory Prize
And from this weekly debacle
comes Floyd's only distinction in
three years as a member of the
faithful. As captain of the Red-

shirts (something like being the
best of the worst), Floyd Day pos-
sesses the Toilet Bowl, a roughly
carved trophy from the knife of
assistant coach Hank Fonde, sym-
bolic of victory in each season's
final freshman-reserve battle.
Saturday, sometime in the
middle of the final quarter, the
public address announcer will
drone the names of those players
"appearing in Michigan Stadium
for the last time." Somewhere
down on the list, after Bill Yearby,
Tom Mack, and Tom Cecchini, the
announcer will say "Floyd Day"
and 85,000 people will shrug their
shoulders. But this won't bother
Floyd Day. For Floyd Day is of a
rare breed: Floyd Day is a nice
guy. And nice guys finish last.

By JOE O'NEILL
The annual fraternity and resi-,
dence halls wrestling finals took
place last night in the I-M Build-
ing.
Most of the meets were very
close, as shown by the fact that
a great majority of the matches
were decided on points.
The wrestling was of the. de-
fensive type for many, as the
competitors could win by escaping
from their opponent's holds. Sev-
eral of the residence hall meets
were interupted by cuts and bad
nose bleeds in the tough compe-
tition. One competitor, Townsend
from Strauss House, was knocked
unconscious after landing on the
mat.
In the residence halls, Adams

House had two finalists, Yablonky
in the 137 pound class, and Korte
in the 147 pound class. Yablonky
won on a double overtime pin, and
Korte picked up penalty points
from his opponent to win. Every
house in the meet except Wenley
placed only one man in the win-
ners' circle.
Quiroz from Chicago House won
on points over McRay of Adams.
Newell of Wenley pinned Town-
send in a knockout. Sharky of
Frost pinned Clark in a quick
meet. Aruin outpointed Purdy in
the 177 pound class. In the heavy
weight finals, Hoyng of Taylor
won over Adamo by points. One of
the closest meets was won by
Young of Wenley in a referee's de-
cision over Anderson.
In the fraternity division, none
of the houses placed more than
one man in the winners' spot.
Winn, of Phi Delta Theta, won in
the 123 pound class, over Oman-

siek. Pitt, from Evans Scholars,
pinned Lynn of Sigma Nu in the
130 pound class. Michaels, from
A.D.P., pinned Moody of D.T.D.
in the 137 pound class. Michaels
had to wrestle two matches in
one night because he didn't com-
plete his semifinal match the
night before.
Pearlman of Phi Lambda Phi
outpointed Goldman from Z.B.T.
in the 147 middleweight class.
Miller of Chi Phi outlasted Lind-
low from Phi Delta Theta in the
157 pound class. Sigma Phi's
Davidson outpointed Koch of
A.T.O. in a hard fought match.
Walker from D.T.D. lost to Parker
of Phi Gamma Delta by points.
In the heavyweight finals, Hilde-
brand of D.U. lost a well fought
match to Welch of D.T.D. to wrap
up the meet.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
RICK STERN

EI

GRID SELECTIONS

I!

A new rule has been added to the Grid Picks contest. It is now
open only to members of the Lloyd Graff fan club. To be acceptable,
an entry must contain in three words or less the statement "I love
Lloyd." So far only one entry, from a Mr. Gary P. Schenk, associate
director of elevators in South Quad, has been acceptable. Unless he
receives competition, Mr. Schenk will win by default the opportunity
to find Miss Bunny Lake, this week's Grand Prize who is hidden
somewhere in the Michigan Theater.

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
1429 Hill Street
SABBATH SERVICES
Tomorrow .
LLOYD GRAFF, Acting Sports Editor, Michigan Daily
will speak on
"HOW TO BE A JEWISH
BROTHER"

FLOYD DAY

NCAA STATISTICS:
Clancy Ranks Near Top
Among Pass Receivers

1. Ohio State at MICHIGAN

2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

(pick score)
Michigan State at Notre Dame
Illinois at Northwestern
Purdue at Indiana
North Carolina St. at Iowa
Wisconsin at Minnesota
Dartmouth at Princeton
Tennessee at Kentucky
Missouri at Kansas
SMU at Baylor

11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.

California at Stanford
UCLA at Southern Cal
Texas Tech at Arkansas
North Carolina at Duke
Oregon State at Oregon
Penn State at Pittsburgh
Wash. State at Washington
Clemson at South Carolina
Rice at Texas Christian
Livingstone at Johnson C.
Smith

Lorry Bo
Marcia E

--A Thanksgiving Day Note
PARTICIPANTS:
brin Lynne Jacobs Jonathan Rose
Berlin Joel Klein Sue Ellen Lorg
John Planer, Jeff Rossio, Cantors
THE HILLEL CHOIR directed by MIKE ROBBINS
Joan Temkin at the Organ
NOVEMBER 19 AT 7:30 P.M. SHARP

enbaum
rge

Jack Clancy, Wolverine end, re-
mained at the number 11 spot
among the nation's pass catchers
despite his eight receptions in last
week's Northwestern contest.
Hauling in 46 tosses over the
season good for 687 yards, Michi-
gan's converted halfback has pick-
ed up an average of 15 yards per
catch, again one of the top fig-
ures in the nation.
Other representatives of the Big
Ten who rank among the nation's
leaders in the weekly NCAA foot-
ball statistics include Bob Griese
of Purdue, and the Illini bull-
dozer, Jim Grabowski. Griese is
fifth in passing, and twelfth in
total offense, picking up a to-
tal of 1,566 yards. Driving for 1,-
071 yards this season, Grabowski
earns second place honors in rush-
ing.
The passing combination of the
Tulsa hurricanes, which has blown
their foes, right off the field, has
gained laurels with their record-
breaking feats. Donny Anderson,
Tulsa field general, has connect-
ed on 23- air strikes for. ,2,7,58
yards while' his' favofiIte target,
Howard Twilley, has snared 106
of these bombs to lead the coun-
try in both pass receiving and
scoring (he also kicks extra
points.)
In team statistics, Michigan
State places fourth in total of-
fense, sixth in rushing offense,
tenth in scoring, fourth in total
defense, first in rushing defense,
and first in defense against scor-
ing.
FORWARD PASSINd

Spurrier, Florida
Norton, Kentucky
Williams, Xavier
Hankinson, Minn.

121
113
107
106

1524
1823
1579
1366

11
11
17
7

RUSHING
Rushes
Garrett, USC 203
Grabowski, Illinois 219
Little, Syracuse 172
..Shivers, Utah State 164
Boh, New Mexico St. 151
Pifer, Oregon State 200
Asbury, Kent State 208
McDonald, Idaho 182
Burnett, Arkansas 202
Ford, West Virginia 123
Brown, Missouri 156
PASS RECEIVING

m..

Yds.
1118
1071
996
986
970
959
900
836
815
778
779

11

1

J

"

"

Caug
Twilley, Tulsa
Love, N. Texas St.
Hughes, Texas West.
Sweeney, Tulsa
Pearce, Win. & Mary
Anderson, Texas Tech
Casey, Florida
McLean, Texas A&M
Hadrick, Purdue
Bunker, Oregon
CLANCY,, MICHIGAN

ght Yds.
106 1486
71 929
64 1345
60 655
54 710
50 654
47 641
47 562
47 562
46 711
46; 687

TD
14
7
8
5
7
6
1
1
8
5

04
1 U .
~y.

Enclosed find $5.00 (Check or Money Order payable to the 4$
Michiganensian) for one 1966 MICHIGANENSIAN. We cannot
bill you later. A receipt will be sent when' your order comes in.
NAME
* ANN ARBOR ADDRESS ____
MAILING INSTRUCTIONS: $1.00 additional charge if you wish
the book mailed anywhere in the world.
4

I

11

SCORING
TD PAT FG Pts.
Twilley, Tulsa 14 26 0 110
Little, Syracuse 17 0 0 102
Shilvers, Utah St. 16 0 0 96
Anderson, Texas Tech-15 0 0.90
Jackson, Marshall 14 0 0 84
- Gogolak,. Princeton 0 31 16 79
TOTAL OFFENSE
Yards Per Game
Tulsa 3400 425.0
Nebraska 3629 403.2
Princeton 2935 366.9
Michigan State 3275 363.9
UCLA 2890 361.3

-is buying your
'Ensian NOW
while they're
only $5!
(NEXT SEMESTER
THEY'LL BE $6.)

U

RUSHING OFFENSE
Nebraska 2566
Notre Dame 2042
USC 2030
Syracuse 2210
Missouui 2166

285.1
255.3
253.8
245.6
240.7

Gabler Aims for Clancy.. .
And NU Surrenders Yardage

i.

Anderson, Tulsa
Wilson, Texas Tech
Stephens, Texas W.
Carlin, N. Tex. St.
Griese, Purdue
Lucas, Pitt.
Hall, Brown,

Comp. Yds. TD
234 2758 25
146 1800 17
146 2404 15
136 1510 11
128 1550 11
126 1693 9
125 1235 8

I yo think girls are. .
TRY MAKING MODELS
Al RPLANES
BOATS
CARS
AT
605 CHURCH ST NO 5-6607 la

Navy Loses
Prized Goat
,ANNAPOLIS, Md. (A') - The
Naval Academy expressed confi-
dence yesterday that its missing
goat will be returned before the
end of the Army-Navy football
game Nov. 27.%
The goat, mascot for the Navy
team, was reported missing early
Sunday from its pen on Navy
property across the Severn River
from the Naval Academy.
A Navy spokesman expressed
doubt about one report which said
eight Cadets from the U.S. Mili-
tary Academy took the goat Sat-
urday night after using four girls
to distract guards by pretending
they were lost and asking for
directions. "We don't feel it was
done by Cadets," said the academy
spokesman.
"We have an agreement that we
won't steal their mule and they
won't steal our goat."
One of two other goats owned
by the academy will be used as a
stand-in mascot if necessary, the
spokesman said.
Ii

Why would he pay $375
for a shotgun,
$19 fora shirt
but onlyak
for slacks.

,ti

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that's without even a
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