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November 18, 1965 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

TILE MicnIGAN. DAILY

,THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18, 1965

PAGE TWO TIlE MIChIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER iS, 1965

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS:

The New Forker'

41

Present Dynamic Imaginative Henry VIOe
7 & 7Only A ppears Funny',

By GAIL BLUMBERG prosaic and, on the surface, hum- evil that was France. In her mys-'
Magazine Editor orless. Thus it was up to the di- ticism, not at all spiritual, and theI
rector to interpret and individual- ruthless use of her femine wiles,
"'Tis much, when sceptres are ize these characters, while making she is not the Joan of Arc of pop-
in children's hands; that interpretation credible and ular conception. Miss Poblacki
But more, when envy breeds realistic. The resulting character- possessed a vital, magnetic quality
unkind division; izations were dynamic, and in which made her portrayal quite
There comes the ruin, there some cases, very interesting. striking and conceivable.
begins confusion."
One of the most skillful char- Richard Esckilsen was very suc-
Herein lies the substance of acterizations was that of Edward- cessful as Shakespeare's villain,
"Henry VI," Shakespeare's early ine Poblocki as Joan Pucelle the Bishop of Winchester, never
chronicle play of the Wars of the (Joan of Arc). Shakespeare por- slipping too badly into the melo-
Roses. Its strength lies in an epic trayed Joan as a symbol of the drama which the role invites.
sweep and unity of dramatic con- -
ception. But, as the immature'
work of a young playwright, the 'OLIVER TWIST':
theme is muddled by the intricate
and often obscure political and,
military details of plot. thenusualPhotograp
same time, the play' as writoten has ~ u u l ht r p
no great or memorable charactersj
and rather ordinary, if at times 'w
monotonous, prose.,3d *- Tb lIE V- lAI WT -5.-

R.nharf MrCill no Rirh arA 'talon- ' v L s. v I I

noert mcu asika raii-
tagenet, Duke of York, showed a
sensitivity in his portrayal of one
of the few characters whose
thoughts are revealed through
asides in the dialogue. Although
I would questions his occasional
bursts of rash emotionalism; at
times it was hard to realize that
this man was a central figure
around whom much subsequent
action was to center.

By MICHAEL JULIAR

hy Vividly
riaers

It is much to the credit of the
University Players that through
superb and imaginative direction,
sensitive acting and judicious cut-
ting, they overcame such odds.
"Henry VI," Part I as performed
last night, was interesting and en-
tertaining-in short, a success.
To begin with, excess material
was cut away. Only those scenes
essential to the development of'
the theme and to the main stream
of historical action were retained.
The audience was provided with a'
family tree, the same appearing
as a mural on the stage. In addi-
tion, red and white roses were
used to identify the feuding fac-
tions.
Shakespeare's characters, with
the exception of Talbot, lack any
organic development. Character is
left to be deduced from the actions
of the plot. All the dialogue is
Acro7ss
Cal pus,
THURSDAY, NOV.18
s 10 a.m.-2 p.m.-Sorority Rush
Registration for freshmen at the
Women's League, Kalamazoo Rm.
2:15 p m.-Herman Koenig, of
Michigan. State University will
talk on the "Stimulation of the
University" in 1057 MHRI.
4 p.m. - The literary college
steering committee will conduct an
open meeting in R. 3D of the
Union. James Shaw, chairman of
the junior-senior counseling office,
will participate in a discussion of
counseling at the University.
4:10 p.m. - Visiting Professor
Luigi Salerno of Pennsylvania
State University will discuss "Ro-
coco Art in Rome" in Aud B Angell
Hall.
I and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Oliver Twist in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Speech University Playeers will
perform Shakespeare's Henry VI
Part I in Trueblood Aud.
8:15 p.m. - Gerald Ford (R-
Mich), House Minority Leader,
will speak in the League Ballroom,
sponsored by the UniversityCol-
lege Republicans and UAC.
8:30 p.m.-School of Music Fac-
ulty Concert will be "Early Italian
Music in Honor of Dante's 700th
Birthday" in Rackham Lecture
Hall.
FRIDAY, NOV. 19
4 pm.-Hans Thirring, of Vien-
na University will speak on "The
Future of Space Industry" in 170
Physics-Astronomy.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present Oliver Twist in the
Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Speech University Players will per-
form Shakespeare's Henry VI Part
II in Trueblood Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Opera presents the
New York Opera Company in Car-
men at Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, NOV. 20
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
presents Oliver Twist in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The Department of
Speech University Players will per-
form Shakespeare's Henry VI Part
II in Trueblood Aud.
8 p.m.-The School of Music
Bandorama presents the. Univer-
sity Bands, William D. Revelli
conducting, at Hill Aud.

U pt LN "tunuitN U rP

"The New Forker," alias thej
Gargoyle, made its way through
hundreds of students' quarters
yesterday and left in its wake!
moderate peals of laughter but
still the strong feeling that the
Garg has a long way to go before
it again becomes the campus in-
stitution it once was in the
fifties.
A parody of "The New Yorker"
calls for more humorous copying
of that sophisticated mag than
just its format and visual style.
Any intelligent student group can
put out.a parody that looks the
part. (One girl cooed to her friend
as she passed a Garg salesman,
"Why look, they're selling The
New Yorker on the Diag now! ")
The Garg staff did a very fine job
on looks. But not just any old
bunch of students can put out a
parody that read like a parody.
Several of the "Going on About
Town" are hilariously funny.
There are enough items here so
that everyone can have his favor-
ite, laugh at it,and leave the rest
Sto those on the Garg staff who,
are proud of their six line precis
of inhibited humor. But most of
the 54 items, that is, about 50 of
them, are just so many lines of
type taking up space that would
be more satisfying to the eye and
to the mind if, they were left com-
pletely white-blank.
t About half, the ads are amusing.
The rest are hypically high school
Juvenile humor that bring scat-

tered laughs from various campus
smilies. Some of the articles are
so serious that I wonder whether
the writers got caught in some
sort of dilemma between an at-
tempt at New Yorker style (which
they failed at completely except in
one article on SEEK), at attempt
at parody ofttThe New Yorker"
style, an attempt at being' the
Garg, and an attempt at making
The Daily look as silly as possible.
The cartoons are roughly-very
roughly-parodies of the "com-
ment on life" you expect in "The
New Yorker." But as a whole, the
Garg is a weak diversion from the
every day campus crises we have
to read about in The Daily, and
the loftier comments on life we
can find in Generation.

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Friday Noon Luncheon-25c
Speaker: ROBERT JOHNSTON, Editor Mich. Daily
"Student Newspapers and Students"

By DAVE KNOKE
Charles Dickens' Oliver Twistf
has probably passed into that
vaguely defined realm of "house-
hold word" by now. Surely, with
the Broadway play and the use of
excerpts as standard classroom
literature, many people need only
hear the title to conjure up images
of the macabre Fagin and his
school for pickpockets. Director-
script writer David Lean has come
up with a treatment of the Dick-
ens novel which is a brilliant
example of successful translitera-
tion from one medium to another.
The pathos and grotesqueries of
Dickens'characters have a way
of approaching cliches, but this
film is saved from self satirization
by the striking photography and
by the actors working in unison
rather than antagonistically. Any
inherent exaggerations do not de-
stroy the "reality" of the Dickens
world; rather, exaggerations and
overstatement mirror the human
state in its wilder passions.
The camera disappears at times
from its detached observations
and moves, now inside the charac-
ters' eyes, now borne along in a
flood of movement.

Old London and the wild,'
purple-moored countryside are
alive. Haunting Dantesque sky-
lines and horizons seethe with a
pent-up energy that threatens to
burst at any moment. Hogarthian'
cameos of street and tavern scenes
assault the eye with their blinding
million-footed activity. The re-
pulsive yet strangely compelling{
objects loom up monstrously on
the screen: sooty candles, tin cups,
plaster peeling walls, interminable3
brick halls, alleys and sewers.
The camera knows no discipline.
All rules of proper staging have'
been thrown out and topsy-turvy
angle shots, shadows obscuring
faces, unintelligble whispers, and
soft focused shots combine to
heighten the effect of somber mel-
ancholy.
Stark contrasts alternate with
stunning rapidity. Scenes drenched
in sunlight, light rays hanging
thick and lazy through windows,
transmit better than any dialogue
the hair's breadth of difference
between the heartless violence and
the secret, stolen joy of those who
exist animal like in the reeking
London slums.
John Howard Davis, who plays

Twist, has an angelic counten-
ance; he is innocence passing un-
scathed through the den of thieves.
Lean and Dickens have penetrated
what is euphemistically called the
"criminal element" and laid bare
its deeper, darker humanity, cruel
and kindly by turns.
Throughout the superficial in-
dictment of Bourgeios hypocrisy,
profit mindedness and well-fed
security runs an undercurrent of
greediness for lift that character-
izes Dickens' voluminous writings.
"Oliver Twist" should be a part
of everyone's cinematic experi-
ences.

DIAL 5-6290
ENDS TONIGHT
ISMISSING
AN 0'W PREMINGEP? FILM
LAURENCE OLI VIER
CAROL LYNLEY
THE ZOMBIES
NOEL COWARD
---FRIDAY
BETTE DAVIS
in "THE NANNY"

Triple Thick Shakes.. 22c
Delicious Hamburgers 15c
2000 W. Stadium Blvd.

1IU

I

I

i

I

The University of Michigan
Gi lbert and Sullivan Society

@I~ t~i~i~S

SHOWS AT 1 :00
3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:00

Ph. 483-4680
s
EmneOn CARPENTER ROAD
FREE CAR HEATERS
NOW SHOWING-

It

Presents

A

ei rate4 o'( P~eh~a'ce

December 1, 2, 3 4

Today: 4:10P.M.
Arena Theatre Frieze Building
Tennessee Williams'
AUTO-DA-FE
Department of Speech
Student Laboratory Theatre
Admission Free

lLIING IT ffUP
TECHNICOLOR K
P IL
PARINE ES
TECHNICOLOR &
TONIGHT THRU SUNDAY
BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
FREE CAR HEATERS

Tickets on Sale 9 A.M.-5 P.M.
Nov. 17-19; 22-24-SAB
Nov. 29-30; Dec. 1-4-Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Wed. and Thurs. Performances-$1.50
Fri. and Sat. Performances-$2.00
Sat. Matinee-$1.00

1.

.I

VOICE-SDS:
HAL DRAPER of Berkeley FSM
on
The Future of the New Left
Friday, Rov. 19-4 P.M., UGLhI Multipurpose Room
Foreign Policy Symposium

I

TONIGHT at 7 and 9 P.M.
DICK EN'S
1 ,
1 1
1 ,
1 I
1 1
1 ,
1 ,
1 .
1 1
1 1
N TH E A RCHITE CTUR E AUDITORIUM ;
i ADMISSION: FIFTY C ENTS i
I
- "
1 1
III Irr r r rr r r r rr r r rr r r r rr r r r

11

I

TOM

I

*.

I

I

I

CARL OGLESBY
On
VIETNAM

MIKE LOCKER
On
Dominican Republic

y, V4O 4 ,
/ Q, '
ti " GK' 4'
G--A
-.-- N

S HAUARD
DOES NOT TAP DANCE

or
BELIEVE IN MAGIC
bu t

he does do very,
with FOLK

good things
vMUSIC!

Monday, Nov. 22-8 P.M., Room 3G Union
.'

I

11

it

I

I'M ZERO.
1 THINK IN A
NOVEL WAY IN..
THE
SQUARE ROOT
OF ZERO
\ roieoi

even if you do like
tap dancing, stop down at
THE CANTERBURY HOUSE
open friday and saturday at 8:30
218 N. DIVISION
one dollar per person

i

I

! ~

I

AUSTIN
DIAMOND

AS USUAL THE UNUSUAL
at
THE SALT BOX
330 MAYNARD
Your Store with
Distinctive Gifts
by
1 ILA E. SAULTS
SMonday till 8:30
U n on *

wU

p

HELD
OVER!

, -Taliryrblmm
.k4AL'17ma I ki I dL!ju,

DIAL
8-6416

The PUBLIC is invited to a
CO0-OP OPEN HO.USE
honoring
REV. H. LYNN and
KATHARINE G. PICKERILL
and
the Grand Opening of
PICKERILL CO-OP
the 10th co-op house,
where 100 students from 3-house complex
eat in new dining room.
ftiAE ., 017OC2 C Emes.

"GO YOU MUST!
a movie!"
"The sheer voyeur

TARZAN IS

BACK

1209 S. University

663-7151

r.ee ee e s

L'

An absolute knockout of
-Crowther, Times
appeal of a nightmare!"
-Crist, Herald Tribune

TOMORROW! DON'T MISS
BANDOAMA,
Featuring 400 Musicians in 5 Bands
University of Michigan
MARCHING BAND
SYMPHONY BAND
JAZZ BAND
SCfJtC'FRT RAND

*

E

of

DEPENDABLEr
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
enrA theOARTS

. ... .

EUI

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