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November 12, 1965 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1965 TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE NINE

ootbal
By RICK FEFERMAN
"There ain't nothing I hate
more than practice. A lot of peo-.
ple call me a Saturday football
player, but I don't believe you play
the way you practice. At 1:30'
Saturday I'm ready to play."
These words are more than just

Saturdays

Bring

Ward

Scrambling

ages to be the first to get his
food."
That's motivation. Here's a dif-
ferent kind: "I like contact-more
than anything else in the world.
Gives me a chance to let off
steam." If that's the case, Carl
Ward should have been a boiler-
maker, because on the field he

*

a commentary on the game ofi just never stops bubling.
football. They are a philosophy of Sleepy
life-Carl Ward's life. When he comes off the field
during a game, however, Ward im-
"When he puts his mind to plements another facet of his
something," said Ward's Cincin- theory. "You have cheerleaders to
nati sidekick Stan Broadnax, "he cheer. If you can go out there
can make good." relaxed, you'll do all right. That's
Last First why when the defense is out there,
Bill Hardy provides one exam- I sit back and rest. If they let
ple: "You know, Carl's always the me, I'd go to sleep."
last one in the room at the train- You have to understand Ward's
ing table. But somehow he man- own peculiar type of dedication

to realize that he's not acting
indifferent towards his teammates.
He loves football, loves to play.
And when he isn't playing Ward
relaxes because he feels it makes
him sharp, at his peak perform-
ance.
Like any athlete who lives
sports ("At home my life is ath-
letics"), Ward is imbued with a.
spirit for his team, of which he
considers himself merely one part.
"What can I look forward to next
year? Well, if WE can get settled
down earlier..."
Anything At All
Of course, Carl is more than,
just a teammate. This is only'
part of him. "Anything you want
in a football uniform, Carl Ward
is it," proffers Bill Hardy.
Ward is playing in a game of
big men, and at 175 pounds he
needs something special to sur-
vive. Ward has a theory about
this, too. "If I can get to them
before they get to me it won't
hurt, because I have the momen-
tum and they'regoing to be tak-
ing the punishment."
"Carl has a tremendous sense
of balance. Combined with his ex-
cellent speed (9.5 for the hun-
dred), Ward gets to the defender
often before he expects it," re-
veals coach Hank Fonde.
Quick's Kicks
"He gets a helluva kick out of1
knocking bigger people down,"
Hardy claims. "Not only that, but
when he runs, if you give him a
little hole, he'll get there some-
way, because he's so quick."
As a matter of fact, Ward had
trouble because of this earlier in
the season. Tom Mack, 'who does
most of Ward's blocking, runs over
defenders ahead of the other
blockers. As a consequence, Ward
was forced to make a lot more cuts

than he wanted to, until he syn-
chronized his running to fit
Mack's blocking.
And when Ward does run with
the ball, things happen. Crazy
things. Against Purdue he zigg6d

statement, because Ward has the
unusual habit of evading tacklers
by leaping over them. At least
three times a game he goes spin-
ning head over heels through the
air; Ward probably has logged
more flying time than Jim Mc-
Divitt.
Ward never was a pacifist, but
football was far from his fav-
orite sport. "My first love was
basketball," he confesses. "I only
played football because the other
kids did. You just can't sit around.
The only reason I played ball in
;high school was that they let me
play defense." Remember, Carl
Ward likes contact.
Lucky Seven?
Ward's ambition had always
been to play in the Big Ten, to
enable him to fulfill his dream
of going to the Rose Bowl. Re-
cruited as a defensive stalwart,
Ward chose Michigan over Illinois,
thus making Pete Elliott's losses
to his brother total seven, not six
as most people think.
Though he always had played
left halfback, Ward switched to
the right side of his own volition
. . . almost: "We were lining up by
positions in the gym, and Jim
Detwiler lined up 'at left half; so
I figured it was time to become
a right halfback."
With one year left, Ward makes
no attempt to mask his rosy am-
bitions. The problem, it seems, is
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that the team has not had the
opportunity to try Ward's philos-
ophy.
"If we go out there relaxed we'll
do all right. Last year we had
Basketball' Back
Collegiate basketball made its
return to the national scene
last night, when two unranked:
but hardy battlers hit the
boards in all-out combat.
A hearty Freed-Hardeman
five whomped arch-foe Lam-
buth, 91-58.
Thus, Freed-Hardeman is the
only listed unbeaten college
basketball school in the nation.
fun, but then this year we had
to live up to it. We were fighting
ourselves earlier in the year. If
we can settle down early ..."
But it takes more than practice.

3

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CARL WARD

inside, couldn't find a hole, went
outside, slipped a tackle, cut in,
broke another tackle and darted
to the outside for 30 yards and a
touchdown.
Flyboy
Though used occasionally on
passes, Ward prefers to run with
the ball, because "you can punish
a guy," he says. Anyone who has
seen Ward run may doubt this

J

School Time
is
OLYMPIA
TIMES

1
04-m4"loictoo

319 W. Huron

665-3688

CARL WARD IS FINALLY PUSHED out of bounds by two Illini
defenders after some downfield scrambling. Ward carried the
ball 19 timesand netted 139 yards rushing for a 7.3 yard average
In the Wolverines' 23-3 victory over Illinois last Saturday.

Ff

i

DEAN ROBERTSON
LAST CHANCE
LECTURE
MICHIGAN ROOM OF LEAGUE

University Typewriter Center
Home of OLYMPIA, the Precision Typewriter
613 E. William St 665-3763
Remember November 16
generation
is coming again,
with poetry
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art
photography
essays
on sale'for fifty cents all over campus

MON., NOV. 15

__. __ _ .

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