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November 12, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"AGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DA TLY

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 12,1965

JAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 12. 1§R~

s :wraa. aa s. t .W.s V t M3x.{..YiiiiV iM } i/V V

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Across Campus
FRIDAY, NOV. 12 atre Program will present the APA
4:15 p.m.-Prof. Saul Sternberg in "You Can't Take It With You"
of the Bell Telephone Laboratory at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
will speak on "On Scanning One's 8:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
Memory" in Aud. B. ical Society will present New York
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema Pro Musica at Rackham Aud.
Guild will present "Me and the 8:30 p.m. - The International
Colonel" in the Architecture Aud. Ball will be held in the Michigan
7:30 and 9 p.m.-The University Union Ballroom.
Dance Dept. will present "An Eve- SATURDAY, NOV. 13
ning of Modern Dance" on the 7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
second-. floor of Barbour Gym- Guild will present "Experimental
nasium. Film Program Number Two" in
8 p.m.-The Christian Science the Architecture Aud.
organization is presenting a lec- 8 p.m.-The Professional The-
ture entitled "The Mythology of atre Program will present the APA
Matter" in Aud. A. in "You Can't Take It With You"
8 p.m.-The Professional The- at Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Wondering
what to do
this 'weekend?
-O
I 'I

College Presidents Analyze Role of Universities

By MICHAEL HEFFER orderly administrative relation- ident Esther Raushenbush, of Sar-
Tha A..c . ships; ah Lawrence College. She suggests

.e merican university is be-
coming the subject of an increas-
ing number of searching reviews of
its role in today's expanding, com-
plex society. Recent speeches by
presidents of leading eastern
schools may pave the way for
evaluation of the university sys-
tem that could change the course,
of higher education.
The most comprehensive ap-
praisal has come from President
James Perkins of Cornell Univer-
sity. Perkins, , after reviewing
"paradoxes" within the university
caused by a changing society,
reaches these conclusions:
" Students in the university
cannot get the same education
as those in small schools;
* Students needing the guid-
ance provided by small student-
teacher ratios do not belong in
th university, where teaching, re-
search and public service occupy
all the energies of faculties and
administration;
* Research, teaching and pub-
lic service must be balanced in
the university;
" The pressure on these three
functions from within and out-
side the university leads to in-
creasingly complex, if not dis-

* The university president is
the only person who can effec-
tively direct these functions in the
university;
0 All universities must cooper-
ate or face the prospect of los-
ing control to the federal govern-
ment.E
College Students

I

that undergraduates in universi-
ties have a chance to do some of
their work as short-term visitingj
students in small colleges.
"I suggest we have a network
of small colleges" with courses
for students from big universities,
she said. "We would have a new
educational system that could

In discussing college students, make the best use of the assets
Perkins said many do not belong of education on a large scale and
at a big university because their still not deprive the vast num-
greatest needs are "wisdom and bers of students of the kind of

advice on how to become an
adult."
He was speaking of students
who are "the product of an age
of earlier freedom and laterre-
sponsibility." They need the "sense
of security that comes from be-
ing a member of a smaller, tighter
community," that the university
cannot provide.
For students who need the at-
mosphere that only the small col-
lege provides, Perkins advocates
that university leaders create al-
ternatives in the form of state-
wide systems of junior colleges
and four-year colleges, and more
intensive television and corres-
pondence courses.
Small Colleges
Another advocate of sending
students to small colleges is Pres-

individual learning the liberal arts
colleges provide."
Sarah Lawrence College is able
to offer this because its student-
teacher ratio is 8-1, while the Uni-
versity of Michigan, as a repre-
sentative big university, has a ra-
tio of about 15-1.
Decentralization
Mrs. Raushenbush sees the uni-
versities as looking to the liberal
arts college for examples in de-
centralizing. The residential col-
lege experiment is one way the
university is attempting "decen-
tralization in the midst of cen-
tralization," she said.
She predicts that decentraliza-
tion in the form of a move to the
small college structure will "de-
termine the character of educa-
tion" in the future.
Perkins, however, sees the small
college as a place to send students
who are not ready to be left on
their own in the university. He
looks toward centralization as a
way out of "internal disorder."
University Levels
It is a paradox, Perkins said,
that "when there is the greatest
clamor among students for admis-
sion to the university, there is the
greatest dissatisfaction with con-
ditions of student life and stud-
ies." The university, he noted, has
"not been very inventive about
how to relate studies and experi-.

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NEWMAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
presents
Sister Mary Aloysius S.S.J.
"PHILOSOPHY OF SELF"
Sister Aloysius is a philosophy professor at Nazareth College. She
received her M.A. degree from Notre Dome, Ph.D. from Catholic
University of America, and was a Fulbright scholar at Louvaine in
Belgium. She has had numerous articles in the Philosophical Quarterly.

ence or thought and advice, and
the result can be frustration, apa-
thy or even revulsion on the part
of good students."
The student is "at the university
to learn-not to manage: to re-
flect-not to decide; to observe-
not to coerce." He said students
lack the wisdom and experience
necessary to manage. "Manage-
ment of the university is general-
ly only on the edge of student in-
terest," he added.
He declared that there are some
students with talent as adminis-
trators whose ideas could be valu-
able to university administrators:
He concluded that if the universi-
ty learns to involve the student
more actively in the learning proc-
ess, they might reduce "his de-
sire for management."
President Grayson Kirk of Co-
lumbia University said he would
be happier if students "appeared
to be grateful for the opportunity
(to get an education) rather than
to indulge themselves in petulant
complaints because they are ob-
liged to be more self-reliant than
they like." He affirmed the right
of students to involve themselves
in off-campus activities, but said
they had "no right to seek special
treatment" if they get into trou-
ble.
President Kingman, Brewster,
Jr., of Yale University, said one
of the "new responsibilities" of
educators "is to remind the most
highly motivated among the on-
coming generation that there is no
short-cut to the intellectual ca-
pacity" necessary "to be useful" in
the world.
He said "posturing in the name
of a good cause is too often the
substitute for thorough thought
or the patient doggedness it takes
to build something."
Toward Indifference
Brewster is very concerned with
"disengagement bordering on in-
difference." By this he means the
result of pressures "which flatten
a capacity for both moral outrage
and a constructive conscience."
Some of these pressures he iden-
tified as privilege of education,
specialization that makes people
"responsible for only a part of life
around them," and "doubt that
paralyzes moral purpose."
He concluded that educators
have the responsibility of holding
"the scales of conflicting opinion
even," so that thought is not sup-
pressed. He added educators must
also keep "the sword of our con-
viction" from falling, and join the
search of today's youth for a sat-
isfactory purpose.
Perkins warned that the uni-
versity is "dangerously close to
becoming the victim of its own
success." This he ascribes to the
great growth of the university

*
4
4

NEWMAN STUDENT CENTER
331 Thompson

FRIDAY, NOV. 12
7:30 P.M.

JAMES A. PERKINS, president of Cornell University, says uni-
versities must start cooperating or face loss of autonomy.

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which leads to greater externalt
demands with increased internal1
complications due to this growth.i
Much of the disorder in admin-
istration he ascribes to competi-I
tion among teaching, research and
public service for prominence. Forc
example, while "the professionsr
are seeking a broader and morek
creative role in society," profes-I
sional education increasing-t
ly stresses "traditional disciplines."i
University research while re-
ceiving increasing support has
been described as "the academic;
Trojan Horse whose personneli
have all but captured the city of
the intellect."I
As professors are becoming in-f
creasingly engaged in activities
outside of the university, educa-.
tion suffers. "At a time whenI
faculty members are in greatest
demand for service around the1
world, there are intimations thatj
their efforts will cost us our uni-
versity soul," Perkins said.'
Equalization
Perkins concluded that teach-t
ing, research and public service
must have equal positions in the
university.I
Kirk agreed, saying, the time,
is over "when a great universityt
can be no more than an institutei
for teaching. "If we are to lead
the world in research, our facul-
ty members are not likely evert
again to have as much time for
personal contact" as they oncei
had.
Perkins presented higher educa-
tion as a "system that runs from
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very best."
CROWN HOUSE
OF GIFTS
307 South State

the department through the col-
lege, the university, the state, the
regional compact, the national as-
sociation and the international
body.
"The university is thus only
one level in the whole vast hier-
archy of education that has been
built around it." The university
must realize that testing, innova-
tion and planning "are increas-
ingly organized and managed out-
side the university," he said.
Therefore the ideal of a self
sufficient community of scholars
is now "a nostalgic dream."
"Where the university has ad-
mitted only reluctantly that oth-
er universities exist - and then
mainly for the purpose of arrang-
ing football schedules-close col-
laboration is now a stark necessi-
ty." With the federal government
having a larger hand in research,
universities must cooperate to
avoid "more direct government in-
tervention."
The burden of cooperation falls
upon the university president, who
should be "campus-located, sys-
tem oriented," Perkins said. The
president is the only one in the
university who can tie together
teaching, research and public serv-
ice.
Perkins concluded that if the
university president does not take
on the more decisive role he ad-
vocates, then "the university may
be headed in the direction of sev-
eral frightening predictions":
1) The prediction that the uni-
versity will become like the pre-
historic monster, the Brontosau-
rus, emitting "great noise but few
constructive comments";
2) The prediction of the. "care-
taker's daughter" dilemma, which
asks, "Who takes care of the care-
taker's daughter when the care-
taker's busy taking care?" Who
will be in charge of 'the univer-
sity's decisions with "the fac-
ulty in orbit, students out look-
ing for their lost identity and ad-
ministrators out setting off dyna-
mite under foundation vaults?";
3) A prediction that the uni-
versity will be "for hire for the
short-run rather than the long-
run needs of society," swayed by
every grant offer;
4) The projection by Presiden*
Clark Kerr, of the University of
California, that universities should
be in a state of "constructive
chaos."
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