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November 11, 1965 - Image 7

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-11

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

s rav a. w .. v iJ

F

Lailey: lachiavell in

Cleats and Shoulder

Pads

By CHUCK VETZNER
When Don Bailey was in second
grade he was interested in cos-
mology. In third grade he want-
ed to be a paleontologist special-
izing in the Mesozoic era. By the
time he reached fourth grade, he
decided to become a nuclear
10 physicist.
Don Bailey is now in the 15th
grade and he plays first string
guard on the Michigan football
team. He has also changed his
mind about his vocation again.
He wants to be a politician.
Offensive line coach Tony Ma-
son has a name to describe Bailey.
He calls him an intellectual rough-
neck.
Kicks .
Bailey says he likes politics be-'
cause 'it's the effect of one man's
mind on another." He also seems
to get a kick out of the effect
one man's body has on another.
At 195 pounds, he is one of the
smallest guards in the Big Ten.
It's a.handicap that proves no
handicap. "He hasn't been beat-
en out yet this year, and last
week he played against a 250-
pound weightlifter," says Mason.
"He has tremendous speed and
there's no one stronger for his
size.
"He gives you everything and
stimulates those around him. He's
all boy."
Semantic Distinctions
"I have to be vicious to get
by," explains Bailey, "but it's not
the same as being mean."
Football means a lot to Bailey,
but it's not everything. The de-
cision to go into politics was made
in sixth grade, and football didn't
even come until freshman year
in high school.;
During a fire drill, the fresh-t
man football coach stood at +the1
exit and watched the childrenl
scamper out. When brawny Bailey
cpme barrellin' through, the coach1
took one look, grabbed him by
the back of his collar, and order-E
ed him out for practice that aft-3
ernoon.,
"I sort of considered sports toi
be foi' sissies up to then," he con-
fecses. ,

he had not been seriously consid-l
ering.I
"I never had any doubts that
I would go into politics," he re-1
calls, "but I never really thought
about the way to do it. I was!
ready to drive a truck and wash'
dishes until' my chance came:
along."
"Most of what I learned was
from books and our high school
wasn't too good. My parents1
couldn't afford to send me to
school and I just didn't think
about it."
The thinking changed when he
earned laurels as a senior and a
swarm of coaches explained that
the bailey's wouldn't have to pay
to send their boy to college.
When he was recruited at Mich-'
igan, he considered the rating of
the Law School just as thorough-
ly as that of the team. His other
two final choices were Princeton
and Wisconsin, both strong on po-
litical science as well as football.
The transition from his unruly
environment to Ann Arbor was
not a simple one.
Pouter
"When Don first came here, he
was a pouter," says Mason. "He
has tremendous self-confidence,
and he would get upset when he
didn't play as well as he thought
he should."
In addition, Bailey injured his
neck as a freshman and then
hurt his foot in the spring drills
that year.
"The coaches helped me a lot
through the first year," Bailey
says. "They taught me to accept
disappointment and to keep plug-
ging away."

known as Buth Trrizzi and somej
other friends. According to Bailey,
"I never said a word to Vidmer,
but Butch kidded him and threat-
ened to break his leg. Ever since
Vidmer has been telling these stor-
ies."
is due primarily from listening to'
him talk. He is an unrestrained
speaker, but is far from garrulous
except for his filibusters on the
high quality of Pennsylvania foot-
ball.
Hall of Famers
When he talks about politics,
the natural impulse is not simply
to listen, but to grab a pencil and
take notes. He manages to includeI
the ideas of Voltaire, Niebuhr,
Hobbs, and Plato in his discourse,

a love for football, but not only
for the sheer joy of the sport. He
feels it has done a lot for him.

In these terms, Bailey's ambi-
tion is related to his athletic rath-
er than in a separate sphere.

Tough But Clean "Football has taught me what
"Sure it's a tough sport." he people are like. People can be
says, "but when the spectator feels good or bad, just as football can
it's dirty and animalistic, he's be clean or . dirty. We live in a
wrong. Non-athletes have the world that needs help. I like to
same competitiveness. They have compete and I like to win. Nat-
courage, but they just don't have urally I would like power, but only
an opportunity to test themselves. to use it right. Fighting is not a
"By playing football, I learn rational recourse to solving prob-
about myself. Especially when lems, but man is by nature a pred-
we're behind. You want to hate ator. That is why government is
yourself, but you must have self- needed."
confidence and pride. That is also why the Michigan
Ejh lfootball team needs Don Bailey.
,xharation He has a physical eloquence that
hI've learned there is an ex- helps the Wolverines survive.
hilaration in doing things hard; Bailey has even more ambitious
and right. It's a reflection of dreams, however.
what the individual has to learn
in response to the group and him- And he's a fighter who has the
self." desire to make them come true.
--

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
"The University and the Student"
Friday Noon Luncheon Discussion

Lunch .Buffet Style 25c

-Daily-Jim Graff
THIS DON BAILEY BLOCK will be worth a thousand political words. Just ask Wally Gabler, the
beneficiary of Bailey's hold on Illinois' Don Hanson in last Saturday's 23-3 win over the Illini.
Bailey's comparatively small 195-pound frame has been deadly at keeping enemy tacklers from

Wolverine backs throughout the s
Bailey grew up In an area
where such attitudes were under-
standable. Home was an unin-,
corporated area in the western
Pennsylvania mining region. He is
listed as living in Greensburg be-
cause that's the mailing address.
But it was the kind of town where
the Post Office was usually flock-
ed with more wanted posters than
letters.
Despite Bailey's scholarly ambi-
tions, much of his time was spent
in Lou's Pool Room which was.
eventually closed down when a

mothers' protest group marched
on city hall.
West Side Story
Bailey's friends and acquaintances
weren't the kind who wore shorts
and licked lollipops. They looked
more like the extras from the cast
of "Blackboard Jungle."
There was Leadpipe Lou who
worshipped Bailey and to show
his affection offered to beat up
anyone. Don didn't particularly
care for him. Leadpipe, a legend
in his own times, earned his mon-
iker when he was attacked in an

'%S TELL STORY:
C be.Ca yDuo Leads '11

alley by five men with a lead pipe.
Lou, as the story ,goes, rose up
from the ground and destroyed all
five of his assaulters.
Other homey inhabitants of
Bailey's high school days were
Hagmaw (first syllable pronounc-
ed "hog"), who spent five years
in jail; Joe Dog, the Italian full-
back who was actually a nice guy,
but had a knack for getting into
fights, and Budney, who was boot-
ed out of the army for shooting
his sergeant in the leg.
Playing high school football did
not diminish the importance of
these associates to Bailey, but the
game did open up new vistas and
opportunities.
Football was something new in
Bailey's life and it excited him.
"When I first went out as a
freshman, they put me at full-
back. It was great; I would just
run and the other guys would try
to stop me.
Sharp Contact
"But there was more to it than
the contact. Football is a chal-
lenge translated into sharp physi-
cal contact. It's the concerted ef-
fort of a team giving everything
needed to win.
"I did some boxing in high
school, but it's not nearly as re-
warding a sport. Football is the
most technically developed game
there is."
The sport also gave Bailey a
chance to go to college-a plan

Another problem was Bailey's IHe also makes his political be-
liefs quite clear. He was asked to
tough guy appearance which he make a promotion for WCBN, the
felt he had to overcome. student radio network which had
Logician the slogan "The progressive sta-
"He had to become more logi- tion." Bailey came up with: "I
cal in his thinking," Mason says. listen to WCBN, the progressive
"He became a man who hit an station, because I prefer prag-
opponent hard, but could walk matic progressivism as opposed to
away from him afterwards. He the more conservative dialectic."
grew up with trouble' and he hadI Wiggles for LBJ
to learn not to look for it or want Bailey is willing to argue with
it-" anyone, though. At last year's
teach-in on Viet Nam, Bailey tried
ymnastsPerfoto wiggle through the Diag crowd
G m s r r to debate the anti-Johnson admin-
Coach Newt Loken's gym- istration speaker.
nastic squad will hold an ex- "I never knew Don was an ath-
hibition meet this afternoon in lete until the end of the year,"
the gymnastics room in the I-M adds one of his former teachers.
Bldg. The meet is open to stu- "He was a good student and was
dents and begins at 3:30. articulate, not just glib. He did a
paper on Machiavelli and he real-
Another reason is the Uncle Re- ly put himself into it."
mus mind of his roommate quar- By his own admission, Bailey is
terback Dick Vidmer. Bailey and pragmatic, not idealistic. He has
Vidmer were high school oppen-
pnf dnA hpir chnl ur in

Wally Gabler, Jack Clancy, and
Carl Ward are Michigan's offen-
sive leaders this season, as con-
firmed by statistics revealed yes-
terday.
Gabler has scored 36 points in'
eight games this season, leading
Rick Sygar by two in that depart-
ment. Gabler's points have all
come on touchdowns while Sygar
has only one touchdown, but 16
extra points and four field goals.
Clancy Sets Record,
Clancy leads in pass receiving
with 598 yards in 38 receptions,
good for Michigan records in both
categories. Clancy's figures put
him in the eleventh spot in na-
tional reception tabulations, be-
hirid Tulsa's Howard Twilley and
Purdue's Bob Hadrick, among
others.
Ward picked up 139 yards Sat-
. ....... .1 . . . d
CARL WARD
utday against Illinois to move
ahead of Dave Fisher in rushing
yardage. For his - performance
against the Illini Ward was named
"Midwest Back of the Week" by
United Press International. All
toll, Ward has gained 458 ground
yards averaging 5.5 per carry, 24
more than Fisher who has aver-
aged 4.1.
Gabler's total passing yardage
is 653 with 44 completions in 94
tries. Sophomore Dick Vidmer has

completed 29 passes in 63 attempts
for 442 yards.
Stan Kemp is responsible for
all of Michigan's 1965 punting
and has averaged 37.2 yards,
punting 41 times.
The statistics including games
against North Carolina, Califor-
nia, Georgia, Michigan State,
Purdue, Minnesota, Wisconsin and

Sygar
Morgan
Detwiler
Punting
Kemp
GAME.

3 40
1 1
1 18
No. Yds.
14 1527
STATISTICS

A1

Illinois:
Scoring
Gabler
Clancy
Sygar
Fisher
Ward
Sharpe
Radigan
Vidmer
D'Eramo
Detwiler
Rushing
Ward
Gabler
Fisher
Sygar
Sharpe
Radigan
Rowser
Schick
Vidmer
Brigstock
Morgan
Hollis
Kemp
Detwiler
Passing
Gabler
Vidmer
Sygar
Ward
Receiving
Clancy
Smith
Sharpe
Fisher
Kirby
Wilhite
Ward

TD CK FG TP
6 0 0 36
4 0 0 24
1 16-17 4-8 34
2 0 0 12
3 0 0 18
1 0 0 6
1 0 0 6
1 0 0 6
0 0-1 0-1 0
2 0 0 12
Tries Net Ave.
84 458 5.5
67 194 2.9
105 434 4.1
44 190 4.3
17 72 4.2
18 60 3.3
13 42 3.2
12 62 5.2
39 -18 -0.5
4 10 2.5
6 11 1.8
2 -7 -3.5
17 61 3.6
Att. Comp. Yds.
94 44 653
63 39 442
2 1 26
3 2 7
No. Yds. TD
38 598 4
20 303 0
4 62 0
1 14 1
3 51 0
2 16 0
3 37 1

SCORES
Michigan 31 N. Carolina
Michigan 10 California
Michigan 7 Georgia
Michigan 7 M.S.U.
Michigan 15 Purdue
Michigan 13 Minnesota
Michigan 50 Wisconsin
Michigan 23 Illinois
Mich. 0

0
0
0
Ave.
37.2
24
7
15
24
17
14
14
3
Opp.
122
67
49
6
337
1087
1084

l
1

I

enus ana ner scnoois were in-
tense rivals.
Vidmer takes delight in telling
"Bailey stories" which portray his
roommate as a character who
could make the Devil shiver. Bailey
claims to be completely innocent
and a victim of a cruel hoax. He
claims the origin of the rumors
was a chance meeting of Vidmer
the night before their high school
teams were to collide in the big
game.
Bailey was with a teammate

FIRST DOWNS
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
NO. OF RUSHES
Net Yds.-Rush.
Net Yds.-Pass.
FORWARD
PASSES ATT'D.
Completed
Intercepted by
Yds. Int'cpt.
Ret'd.
TOTAL PLAYS
PUNTS, NUMBER
Ave. Dist.
KICKOFFS,
Returned by
YDS. KICKS
RETURNED
Punts
Kickoffs
FUMBLES
Ball lost by
PENALTIES, No.
Yds. Penalized

158
92
57
9
429
1558 1
1135 1

164 186
77 95
12 10

113
593
41
37.2

154
523
54
37.9

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