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November 07, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-11-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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THE MICHIGAN BAttY Z~1~.ZE'j kflh1LW,~

ratkg THREE

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Rhodesia

Accuses

Britain

PLAN FOR FUTURE:
Soviets Op timistic
About World Peace

Of Hindering Negotiations

r

Cuba Agrees
To Refugee
Evacuation
3000-4000 To Be
Transported By U.S.
Airliners To Miami
JOHNSON CITY (MP)-President
Johnson announced yesterday an
agreement with Communist Cuba
permitting 3,000 to 4,000 Cuban
refugees to find asylum in the
United States each month.
The mass exodus of Cubans will
begin not later than Dec. 1. The
refugees will be flown to Miami
from Cuba aboard commercial air-
liners chartered and paid for by
the U.S. government.
The planes will fly out of the
airport at Varadero, Cuba; 60
miles east of Havana.
Personnei of the U.S. Public
Health Service and of the U.S.
Immigration and Naturalization
Service will be stationed at Var-
adero to make certain that the
movement will be carried out "hn
accordance with U.S. laws and
regulations," press secretary Bill
D. Moyers said.
Johnson Satisfied
Johnson expressed satisfaction
with the arrangement, worked out
through the Swiss Embassy which
represents American interest in
Havana.
However, White House officials
made no secret of the fact that
they were unhappy because, at
this time, Cuba is barring the exit
of three categories of potentIal
refugees:
-Political prisoners.
-Certain technicians and pro-
fessional people whose skiPs are
needed on the Communist island.
-Draft-eigble men of 15 to 26.
Further Negotiation
Diplomatic notes exchanged by
the Swiss Embassy and the Cuban
government left open the possi-
bility of further negotiation in be-
half of the three groups.
White House officials said they
could not estimate the number of
refugees who will enter the coun-
try under the agreement. It is
expected to mount into the tens
of thou~sands.
Final Control
These same officials emphasized
that the United States would have
final control over who gets ad-
mitted.
Moyers said in response to a
question that necessary and ade-
quate procedures have been set
up to screen out potential spies
and subversives.
Moyers said he did not know
how soon the actual refugee air-
lift might begin.
"It will take a few days for
these procedures to be ready for
operations," he said.

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Says Wilson
Reneges on
His.Promise
Commission's Verdict
Not To Be Accepted ;
As Solution to Crisis
SALISBURY, Rhodesia (R) -
Prime Minister Ian Smith accused1
Prime Minister Harold Wilson of
Britain yesterday of wrecking
prospects for a settlement of the
Rhodesian independence crisis.
In a letter to London, Smith
charged Wilson had reneged on
his agreement for a royal commis-1
sion toseek a solution to Rhodes-
ia's demand for independence
from Britain.
Smith claimed Wilson had done1
this by announcing that the Brit-
ish government wlil not be bound1
by the findings of the commis-
sion, which would be made up of
one Britain, one Rhodesian and
the chief of the Rhodesian Su-
preme Court.j
Wilson and Smith agreed to the
commission during the British
leader's visit to Rhodesia last
week.
Independence Terms
The commission's task was to
determine whether this central
African nation of 225,000 whites
and 3.8 million blacks wanted in-
dependence under the terms of the
1961 constitution. This constitu-
tion restirets the political activ-
ities of the blacks and gives con-
trol to the whites.
Wilson wanted a referendum to
get the answer but Smith's all-
white government rejected this.
Britain is willing to grant Rho-
desia independence but insists on
guarantees for eventual majority
rule, which would give the blacks
control of the government.
Unilateral Declaration
Smith's government has threat-
ened a unitlateral declaration of
independence.
Smith's message caught British
officials by surprise. Wilson was
in Cardiff, Wales, for the wedding
of a niece. He said there he had
nothing to say about Smith's
message.
But other informants said it
did not appear Smith was shut-
ting off prospects for further ne-
gotiations or washing his hands
of the royal commission.
Some sources in London said,
however, they could not see how
Smith now could avoid carrying
out his threat of declaring inde-
pendence - a move that could
bring world sanctions and boy-
cotts upon Rhodesia.

MOSCOW RA) - Strong signs
are apearing here that .Soviet
leaders have decided to base their
plans for the next five years on
an expectation of world peace.
Half a year ago, they were in-
dicating anxiety about the possi-
bility of a general war, emphasiz-
ing the need to be ready for it.
Today they still are accusing the
United States of aggression in"
Viet Nam and elsewhere, still
blustering about the dangers to
peace. But they seem to have de-
cided it is safe to plan on avoid-
ing a major, nuclear war, give or
take a few localized conflicts.
Developing Economy
As a result, they are concentrat-
ing on developing the Soviet Un-
ion's civilian economy, both in
heavy industry and consumer
goods, instead of gearing for de-
fense production.
A decision on the prospects for
waro r peace had to be made be-
fore the Soviet five-year plan for
1966-70 could be written. The
country lacks enough resources to
prepare for war while trying to
modernize its backward agricul-
ture and carry out oft-defaulted
promises of better living stand-
ards.
Last Spring
Last spring it looked bad to
them. The United States had be-
gun bombing a Communist coun-
try, North Viet Nam. That and
other things made Kosygin say
that the benefits of defense sav-
ings were not possible and that de-
fense must go ahead of consumer
goods.

A number of developments
might have made the leaders
change their minds.
They include the cooling down
of a sense of crisis over Viet Nam,
the recent setback to Chinese
hopes for expanded influence
which carried dangers of East-
West collisions, and the troubles
of the Atlantic alliance with its
delay in a multilateral nuclear
force.
HEAR-
Ernest Mosey, Dir. of
the Michigan branch of
the A.C.L.U.on
McCARTHYISM, STUDENT
PROTESTS, and CIVIL
LIBERTIES
Sunday-7 P.M.
Room 3B of the Union

SUNDAY
Paul Goodman
will speak in the
multipurpose rm.
of the Ugli
on
"Student Activism.
and the New Left"
8 P.M.
MONDAY
At noon on the Diag
KENNETH BOULDING
and
PAUL GOODMAN
will speak on
"American Foreign
Policy and Vietnam"
SDS

U

GUILD HOUSE

802 Monroe
Monday noon luncheon 25c
SPEAKER
NORMAN THOMAS
"CONVERSION OF LAW INTO ADMINISTRATION"

11

H A1RNN4Y

TAKEN NEAR VUNG TAU:

Viet Cong Abducts Air Force
Officers; Search Under Way

i

11

i

SAIGON ( )-A U.S. spokesman
announced yesterday the Viet
Cong abducted four U.S. Air Force
noncommissioned officers 1 as t
Sunday and an intensive hunt is
under way to recover them. Heli-
copters and planes scanned the
countryside for clues.
The four were reported stopped
at a Red roadblock while returning
to Saigon; from leave in Vung Tau,
a seaside resort and military cen-
ter 45 miles southeast of this city.
The trap was sprung only five

World News Roundup

or 10 miles from Vung Tau.
Unofficial sources said one of
the men had escaped and made
his way to a Vietnamese govern-
ment outpost. This was their :tory,
officially unconfirmed:
The man reported a second
American escaped with him, but
was later recaptured. The man
who reportedly got away was quot-
ed as saying he heard a shout
"No, no, no," and then a burst of
gunfire.
There was no word on the other
two men. Military authorities de-
clined to identify any pending
notification of next of kin. All
were based at Tan Son Airport in
Saigon.
In operational a f f a i r s, the
spokesman disclosed a n o t h e r
American raid on a North Viet-
namese surface-to-air missile site.
About 15 U.S. Navy jets from
the 7th Fleet carrier Oriskany
hammered the missile site and a
bridge 35 miles east of Hanoi with
35 tons of bombs Friday after con-
ventional ground fire downed one
of the planes in that area.

Other Navy craft and U.S. Air
Force planes flew armed route
reconnaissance missions north of
the border Saturday, gunning for
ferry facilities, barges, roads and
bridges.
There was no announcement
here of any losses in these opera-
tions.
Red China's New China News'
Agency broadcast a Hanoi dis-
patch declaring that five U.S.
aircraft. including a helicopter
were shot down and several of the
pilots were captured.
Aground, men of the U.S. ist
Infantry Division probed an ex-
tensivL Viet Cong tunnel syste.m
they uncovered in hills 20 miles
north of Saigon.
Briefing officers said the Areri-
cans kiled at least five Viet Cong
and overran an underground med-
ical station in action that cosi
them light casualties.
The tunnels were head high anc
several ran as far as 60 feet intc
the hillsides. Many contained de-
molition charges left by the guer-
rillas.

,
t
1
S
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t

By The Associated Press
SINGAPORE - President Su-
karno of Indonesia claimed yes-
terday the United States once
offered him a large personal bribe
to spread Western ideas thrcugh-
out his left-leaning nation. He
also said that after last month's
pro-Communist coup the United
States offered help to the nation.
Sukarno implied that both the
alleged bribe and offer of help
were rejected. As for the offer of
help, Sukarno said he told U.S.
Ambassador Marshall Green: "You
Americans always pretend to help
us when we look like winning."
* * *
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan "- Six
Indian soldiers were killed in a
clash along the ceasefire line, a
Pakistani government statement
said yesterday.
The clash took place in the
Wagah sector, 200 miles east of
Rawalpindi and there were no
Pakistani casualties, it added. The
statement also reported "sporadic
firing" in Kashmir and in the
Fazilka and Gadra sectors in
West Pakistan.
* * *
CAPE KENNEDY-A map mak-.

ing satellite named Geos 1 suc-
cessfully rocketed into orbit yes-
terday to chart the size and shape
of the earth and distance between
far apart places.
The 385-pound geodetic explorer
rode in the nose of a three-stage
Delta rocket that vaulted away
from Cape Kennedy in a rain
storm at 1:39 p.m.
MANILA - Three days before
national elections president Dios-
dado Macapagal freed the Fili-
pino currency yesterday treaffirm-
ed a pro-Western foreign policy
and pledged to send a military
unit to help South Viet Nam.
* * *
WASHINGTON - President
Johnson has dealt a blow to con-
gressional hopes for a quick end
to the requirement that half of all
wheat sold to Communist coun-
tries must be transported on U.S.
ships.
In a letter to 11 members of the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee, who had urged immediate
lifting of the requirement, John-
son said it "is under constant re-
view within the administration"
but gave no hint action is likely
at any time soon.

program schedule
THE
NEW YORK
PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Tune in the Philharmonic each Sunday at 2:00 p.m.,
(WUOM-FM, 91.7 on your dial), brought to you through
special arrangements between the University of Mich-
igan, Ann Arbor Federal and the Liberty Music Shop.
The current program schedule is:
Sunday, November 7
SZELL, Conducting; CURZON, Pianist
Mozart: Ov. "Marriage of Figaro";
Mozart: Piano Concerto, K. 595;
Bruckner: Symphony No. 7

am h1ourglass
-
S ut ady o un......dd e n y
.~iii : ii~L st{ii

1

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TONIGHT at 7 and 9
EXPERIMENTAL FILM PROGRAM

BROTHERS FOUR
BLOCK TICKETS

BLUE MOSES (Brakhage)
CATHOLICAM (Hindle)

CINESUMAC (Dasque)
PETREFIED DOG (Peterson)

ELDORA (Markopoulos) L'OPERA MOUFFE (Varja)
WE ARE THE LAMBETH BOYS (Reisz)

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