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October 30, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.



SATURDAY, OCTOBER, 30, 1965

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T HE MICHIGAN DAILY prr.wr'

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Blue
0 By RICK STERN
For the first time in two years,
the pressure is OFF.
When they take the field
against Wisconsin this afternoon,
Michigan's Wolverines will have
virtually nothing at stake. There
+ are no Big Ten championships on
the line, the Wolverines protect no
national prestige, and there is no
deep rivalry between the two
schools.
As a matter of fact, the game is
about as significant to outsiders
as a late season baseball battle be-
tween the Washington Senators
and Kansas City Athletics. (A
comparably i m p o r t a n t football
game might be the William Jewell.
College - Nebraska W e s 1 e y a n
classic.)
INSTA NT-
MILDNESS
yours withX
Y ILBO L E._

Outi
But to Chalmers W . Elliott, .
Milton Bruhn and 80-odd athletes,
the game is important, pressure or
no.
Michigan hasn't beaten Wiscon-
sin ,in 1 years (there have been
three meetings), and hasn't won
in conference play this season.
But there's no pressure. Win or
lose, Michigan's status in the
weekly football polls won't change.
Wisconsin still harbors very
dim Rose Bowl hopes, having lost
but one conference duel. But a
Wisconsin appearance in the Rose
Bowl is as probable as a North-
western win over Michigan State,
and highly related.
Not Good Enough
Anyway, "Wisconsin isn't good
enough to go to the Rose Bowl."
At least that's what the 'experts',
said at the beginning of the sea-
son. The Badgers carried three
sophomore backs, the kicking situ-
ation was impossible, and the de-
fensive was unproven. 'In short,
the team "couldn't win."
And they didn't-the first two
weeks of the season. A 0-0 tie with
Colorado, and a 26-6 loss to USC
preceded the Badgers' first Big
Ten game. But in that game,
against Iowa, Wisconsin was
"lucky," 16-13. The next week they
were slammed 37-0, but losing to
Nebraska by only 37 points is an
accomplishment. Two weeks ago,
Wisconsin stopped Northwestern
21-7, but last Saturday they fum-

ISo
IWISCONSIN

Stop

Wisconsin

"Badgering"

4

MICHIGAN

84
75
60
57
67
71
86
11
42
24
44

Louis Jung (194)
Phil Sobocinski (220)
John Roedel (222)
Anthony Loukas (222)
Dick LaCroix (224)
Chuck Currier (244)
William Fritz (225)
Charles Burt (202)
Tom Schinke (178)
Dennis Lager (186)
Tom Jankowski (201)

LE
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
RE
QB
LH
RH
FB

Steve Smith
Charles Kines
Dennis Flanagan
Joe Dayton
Don Bailey
Tom, Mack'
Jack Clancy
Wally Gabler
Rick Sygar
Carl Ward
Dave Fisher

(229).
(238)
(215)
(218)
(198)
(235)
(195)
(195)
(180)
(180)
(215)

86
78
64
58
55
96
96
29
18
18
33

bled their way to a 20-10 loss to
Ohio State.
"We're a spirited team, we try
awfully hard, and our improve-
ment has been excellent," said
Bruhn as he surveyed A4is charges
yesterday afternoon in an awe-
somely quiet Michigan Stadium.
How have Wisconsin's problem
areas progressed during the course
of the season? Listen to Bruhn.
Soph QB
"We're inexperienced, but our
sophomore quarterback, C h u c k
Burt has come along well. By the
time Burt becomes a senior, he
should be outstanding. The only
problem is that he hasn't played
consistently well, and when he
plays badly, the team plays badly.
The two sophomore halfbacks
(Tom Schinke and Dennis Lager)
have left something to be desired
but have also shown improve-
ment.
"Jesse Kaye and Gary Pinnow

are our kickers. Pinnow is capable
of connecting on a long field goal,
while Kaye specializes from closer
in.
"The defense has actually be-
come our strong spot. They've
given us a real boost in previous
games and should play a key role
today, too."
Sparking the Badger defense
are seniors Dave Fronek and Ray
Marcin. "Marcin got so fired up
before the Northwestern game that
he spent the pre-game warm-up
period jumping tip and down on
the sidelines, shouting oaths at
the Northwestern bench. Marcin,
5'10" and 228 pounds, is a line-
backer.
Troublemaker
Fronek, perhaps a little less
frightening than his enthusiastic
cronie, is nonetheless a speedy
safety who can cause trouble for
Wolverine backs. He is the Wis-
consin captain.

Quarterback Burt has been not-
ed to give away the direction of a
pass play by checking the defen-
sive alignment in the area of the
intended bomb before calling the
signals. Bruhn thinks he is over
this habit. "He is capable of fak-
ing his glances too," said Bruhn.
The Best So Far
What does Bruhn think of
Michigan?
"They're the best Big Ten team
we've played so far-better than
Ohio State. We'll be watching
Carl Ward, who we know as a
Post Time: 1:30
Kickoff is 1:30 this after-
noon. The game will be broad-
cast on radio stations WPAG,
WAAM, WUOM, of Ann Arbor,
and station WWJ of Detroit.
Ticket manager Don Weir stat-
ed that one dollar tickets will
go on sale at noon today for
grade and high school students
only.
shifty nifty back. Wally Gabler
appears to have established him-
self. He seems to play a lot like
his predecessor, (Bob) Timber-
lake. I expect a balanced attack
from Michigan, with backs like
Ward and (Dave) Fisher for
Gabler to hand off to and ends
like (Jack) Clancy for him to
throw to."
The Wolverines have lost three
conference games in a row, and
also carry a pre-conference loss
against Georgia. Not since 1934
has Michigan lost five successive
games in one season.
Line coach Tony Mason paused
in Yost Field House yesterday af-

F *r
fE '
C':

HALFBACK RICK SYGAR takes a handoff from quarterback Wally Gabler before heading
through the line in the Purdue game. Blocking for Sygar is Carl Ward at far left, and Dave Fisher
at far right. It is likely that these four will start today in the Wolverine backfield against Wis-
consin.

PRO BASKETBALL:
Pistons Drop Celts at Buzzer

ter demonstrating his basketball
prowess to Dave Strack. Mason
commented on the spirit of the
Michigan players in the face of
four straight losses. "Our mental
state is good, real good. The boys
are fired-up, they wyant to win,

and they are going to win. In foot-
ball it's a 'must' game everytime
you take the field, and I'm not
just trying to sound clever."
Annihilation
The tobacco chewing Mason
holds great respect for the Wis-
consin defense, whose annilation
is the object of his offensive line.
"They're very strong defensively,"
said Mason. "They have only one,
sophomore there and the entire
unit has been extremely tough all
season.
"Offensively. I don't even know'

their names," added Mason, in a
classic illustration of athletic spe-
cialization.
The status of Michigan defen-
sive stand-outs Bill Yearby and
Tom Cecchini remained doubtful
yesterday. Cecchini was injured
last Saturday against Minnesota.
Yearby missed the Minnesota
game, having suffered a pinched
nerve the weeli before. Both prac-
ticed this past week but did not
"Zit"-in. other words were not
involved in body contact plays and
drills.

By The Associated Press
DETROIT-Ray Scott bagged a
short turn around jump shot with
two seconds left to play last night
and enabled the Detroit Pistons
to beat the Boston Celtics 108-
106.
It was the first time since Feb.
24, 1964, that the Pistons had

managed to beat the world cham-
pions. It was only their second
triumph in 28 games over a three-
year period with the Celtics.
Buntin Roars
Trailing 60-40 at the half and
91-80 with four minutes of the
final period gone, the Pistons
roared back on the shooting of
Eddie Miles and rookie Bill Bun-

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tin, finally going ahead for the
first time on a jumper by Miles.
After Detroit opened a five-
point bulge and then a four-point
lead with less than two minutes
to go, Willie Naulls and Sam Jones
hit for jurners-the latter with
19 seconds remaining-to tie the
score at 106-106.
Then came Scott's decisive shot.
Miles, with 36 points and Scott
with 18 led the Pistons who now
stand -3-3. A 51-point effort by
Sam Jones went down the drain
for the Celtics.
Like the Yankees
The setback was the third in a
row for Boston against/ two vic-
tories and marked one, of the rare
times in the last' nine years the
Celtics ,have dropped behind the
.500 mark.
BALTIMORE-Oscar Robertson
scored 33 points and set a Civic
Center record with 15 assists as
he led the Cincinnati Royals to
a 131-121 National Basketball As-
sociation victory over the Balti-
more Bullets last night.
Robertson, who tried only 12
shots in the first half while con-
tenting himself with the feeder's
role, took charge at the start of
the third period and put the game
out of reach of the Bullets.
Sinking Fast
The Big O sank five of his first
six shots after intermission and
scored 11 points as the Royals
outscored Baltimore 24-10 in the
first seven minutes and spurted to
an 88-71 lead. Cincinnati led 64-
61 at halftime.
1Substitute "Happy" Hairston
scored 21 for the Royals while
playing only 20 minutes in the
second and fourth periods. Jerry
Lucas scored 19 for the Royals
and grabbed 24 rebounds..

* READY TO THROW the pigskin is quarterback Wally Gabler
to waiting halfback Carl Ward at right. Gabler, who is now the
first-string signal caller for Michigan, will face Wisconsin's
rugged defensive line today, as the Wolverines bid for their first
conference win of the season.
DON'T MISS THAT IMPORTANT
PHONE CALL!
CALL 665-8657
For NEW, LOW-RATE residential
telephone answering service!

Aristocrat, Billiard Shape, $5.95 and $6.9
No matter what you smoke you'll
like Yello-Bole. The new formula,
honey lining insures Instant Mild-
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not change your smoking habits
the easy way - the Yello-Bole
way. $2.50 to $6.93.
Spartan Checker Thorn
$2.50 $3.50 $4.95
Official Pipes New York World's Fair
Free Booklet tells how to smoke a pipe;
shows shapes, write: YELLO-BOLE
PIPES, INC., N.Y. 22, NY. Dept. 100.
By the makers of KAYWOODIE

NBA STANDINGS
Eastern Division
W L]
Philadlphia 2 49
Cincinnati 3 3
Boston 2 3
New York 2 4
Western Division
wL:
San Francisco 3 1
Los Angeles 4 2
St. Louis 2 2
Detroit 3 3
Baltimore 2 5

Pct.
1.000
.500
.400
.333
Pct.
.750
.667
.500
.500
.286

GB
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-1966 Yamahas available now with Yamaha's
injection system, 5 sp trans 27 hp 75000 rpm
-Holder of the quarter mile drag record 95.74 mph
-Holder of speed record for 250 c.c. class 173.00
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winner of safety and engineering award
--Ride a winner ride Yamaha Sportcycles
-NICHOLSON M C Sales-224 S. First-662-7409

(By the author of "Rally Round!the Flag, Boyal",
"Dobie Gillis," etc.)
TWELVE IS A MANY-SPLENDORED THING
Today I begin my twelfth year of writing this column in
your campus newspaper.
These dozen years have passed like a dozen minutes. In
fact, I would not believe so much time has gone by except
that I have my wife nearby as a handy reference. When I
started this column, she was a mere slip of a girl-supple as
a willow bough and fair as the morn. Today she is gnarled,
lumpy, and given to biting the postman. Still, I count my-
self lucky. Most of my friends who were married at the same
time have wives who chase cars all day. I myself have never
had this trouble, and I attribute my good fortune to the
fact that I have never struck my wife with my hand. I have
always used a folded newspaper, even during the prolonged
newspaper strike of 1961 in New York. During this journal-
less period I had the airmail edition of the Manchester Guard-
ian flown in daily from England. I must admit, however,
that it was not entirely satisfactory. The airmail edition of
the Guardian is printed on paper so light and flimsy that it
makes very little impression when one smacks one's wife.
Mine, in fact, thought it was some kind of game and tore
several pairs of my trousers.
,But I digress. For twelve years, I say, I have been writ-
ing this column. That is a fact, and here is-another: I shave
every morning with Personna Stainless Steel Blades. I bring
up Personna Stainless Steel Blades because this column is
sponsored by the makers of Personna and they are inclined,
to brood if I omit to mention their products.
N. . enthusiasm among
the coaches.
* }
Not, let me hasten to state, that it is any chore for me to
sing the praises of Personna-as you will agree once you try
this sharpest, smoothest-shaving, longest-lasting blade ever
devised by the makers of Personna Blades-now available
both in Double Edge and Injector style. Personna, always
the most rewarding of blades, today offers even an extra re-
ward-a chance to grab yourself a fistful of $100 bills from
a $100,000 bowl! The Personna Stainless Steel Sweepstakes
is off and running, and you're all eligible to enter. Visit your
friendly Personna dealer soon to pick up an entry blank
(void where prohibited by law).
And, by the way, while you're at your friendly Personna
dealers, why don't you ask for a can of Burma Shave? It
comes in Regular or Menthol; it soaks rings around any
other lather, and it's made by the makers of Personna.
But I digress. For twelve years, I say, this column has
' been discussing, forthrightly and fearlessly, such burning
campus questions as "Should students be allowed to attend
first-hour classes in pajamas?" and "Should deans be re-
tired at age 25?" and "Should foreign exchange students be
held for ransom?".
Today, continuing the tradition, we take up the thorniest
academic problem of all: the high cost of tuition. Let me
tell you how one student, Lintel Sigafoos byname, solved
this problem.
Lintel, while still a boy in Straitened Circumstances,
Idaho, had his heart set on college, but, alas, he couldn't
afford the tuition. He applied for a Regents Scholarship
but, alas, his reading speed was not very rapid-only two
words an hour-and before he finished even the first page
of his exam, the Regents had closed their briefcases crossly

*du Pont Reg. TM.

x-Late game not included.

r

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MICRO-CLEAN.ING
MEANS CAREFUL ATTENTION TO DETAILS
As you know, people are better than machines
when it comes to fine details in finishing a suit
or dress. That's why Greene's have fashion-wise,
skilled pressers to touch up each garment by
hand before it goes to final assembly.
It's another "Finishing Touch" Greene's cus-
tomers have come to expert.

!f

Aircraft
ENGINEERING REPRESENTATIVES WILL BE ON CAMPUS
TO GIVE SENIORS AND GRADUATES COMPLETE DETAILS ON

Sikorsky

x;

ENGINEERI
WITH THE PIONEER
0I

' - '
se .

NG OPPORTUNITIES
AND LEADING MANUFACTURER
VTOL AIRCRAFT

I

i

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