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October 27, 1965 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-27

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THE MICHIGAN DA1LY

WEDNESDAY, 6CTOBER 27.1965

TIlE MiCHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 27. 1965

LLOYD GRAFF

Wisconsin Hopes Rest with Rugged Defense

4

By HOWARD KOHN s
t

Football in the Big Ten hasT
" ; become so unpredictable that even
Cubbies and Leo Durocher the inexperienced Wisconsin team
that appeared to be the "patsy"
Hasheesh t a Corn Cob Pipe of the league at the beginning of t
the season now looks like a fair
test for the defending,!- champion
The Chicago Cubs and Leo Durocher mix like Geritol and Wolverines.
Barbra Streisand, like a corn cob pipe and hasheesh, like stale Those lonesome Badgers hiddena
crackers and hot pastrami, like Dr. Seuss and Alan Ginsberg. Such up in the northern badlands ofb
a match could only have been in heaven-or atop the Wrigley Wisconsin had only 16 lettermen,
Building. returning this year, and thesei
As you know, the Cubs are my team. I love them like only men were back from a mediocre0
a Southside Chicagban could adulate a Northside team, like a p
kid loves a pup, a teenager loves a hotrod,' a masochist loves N IIUTTedii
his tormentor. M1U Rated
For all of my 20 years I've adored my Cubbies as they bounced
on the waves of baleful fortune from fifth to eighth place with I
great players like Hank Sauer, Andy Pafko, Dee Fondy, Ernie Banks,n
Ron Santo and Billy Williams, all sure Hall of Famers. '"e
And my supermen have had their Jimmy Olsons to provide 'By The Associated PressC
comic solace. There was shortstop Jack Littrell who batted .137
in a full season while making 50 errors. I remember the high Michigan State's victory over
point of Jack's career when he smashed a dribbler and beat it highly rated Purdue sent the Big
out, then proceeded to get picked off base for the last out in Ten Spartans ahead of Arkansas
in a close vote for the No. 1 posi-X
the ninth inning. tion in the Associated Press col-
And there was Sammy Taylor who threw two balls on the same lege football poll.
steal down to a terrified Ernie Banks at second base. The undefeated Spartans sup-X
And there was Bob Buhl who didn't get a basehit in almost planted the Razorbacks by the
two years at the plate. narrowest of margins - s e v e n
The names of those magnificent nonentities of the past re- points, less than the total of oneE
verberate in my mind. Elder White, Sammy Drake, Paul Minner, first place vote.
Elmer Singleton, Lee Gregory, Harry Chiti, Roy Smalley, Eddie Arkansas, 55-20 winner overi
Miksis, Hy Cohen, Jim Bolger, Owen Friend, Frank Ernaga, Warren North Texas State, even outscoiedr
Hacker, Chuck Conners, Taylor Phillips. Each name carries a 23 to 19, but fell off in the second
distinctive debacle. This potpourri of lackadaisical loafers and and third positions.
hustling. hipsters comprised the guts of the team I've had a lifelong Ten points are given for a first
affair with. place nomination, nine for second
And now Leo Durocher, brash, Bronxish, and bald, takes over so on down the line. Michigan
my Cubbies. It just doesn't fit. State drew 473 points from the
First of all, P. K. Wrigley, the absentee owner of the Cubs, is panel of 51 sports writers and<
so Fifth-Avenuish you can even smell it over the spearmint. And broadcasters w h i l e Arkansas,1
P. K. is so nice that he runs a baseball team like a geriatrics clinic, which went to the top last week
giving eighty-year-old former Cubs vice-president badges. for the first time in history, col-
Actually, sweeter-than-juicy-fruit Wrigley leaves most of the eed 466.
Nebraska, like the Spartans. and
baseball decisions to John Holland, Cubs' general manager. Mr. Razorbacks unbeaten and untied
Holland has been called the Warren G. Harding of baseball in six games, held to its No. 3,
though I think it defiles the memory of our President. I like to place with 424 points, including
think of him as the Cubs' Milt Plum. nine first place votes.
Holland, known in baseball circles as a poor man's Ford Frick, Notre Dame, on the basis of its
has made innumerable brilliant trades, but his culminating achieve- impressive 28-7 rout of Southern
ment presented the Cardinals a pennant two years ago by trading California on national television,
ayoung.,centerfielder with fabulous potential, Lou Brock, for a surged from seventh to fourth,
bonechipped has been pitcher named Ernie Broglio. This is trading 5Pwedbdue Ni6, StForida, No.N7;
a daisy for a dandilion. Southern California, No. 8; Texas,
Holland and Durocher ought to get along just peachy keeno-- No. 9, and Alabama, No. 10.
for the first week or so. Alabama, the defending national
Durocher is a wiseoff, a tough guy, a slightly obnoxious New champion, replaced Georgia, which
Yorker who kicks umpires and tells off baseball commissioners. lost to Kentucky 28-10. All other
Durocher and Holland. Durocher and my Cubbies. It's just hard teams in the Top Ten are re-
to fathom. Durocher, Holland, and Wrigley are three musketeers turnees, although shaken up in
who will never stick together. If Leo ever gets my team out of the position.
second division he'll need a new front office man. South Carolina, 2w1-7, rose from
HeyouLeoarograduate-in May. fro
Hey Leo, 'I graduate in May._ ninth, Purdue held No. 6 despite
its loss and Florida, idle, gained
one rung. Southern Cal dropped
Sfrom fourth 'and Texas, losing to
Bullets Top Pistons, Rice 20-17 for its second setback,
dropped from fifth.
The Top Ten with first place
svo teand season records in paren-
Lio s To Benchl Plum1 theses, and total points figured on
10-9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1 basis:
By The Associated Press By The Associated Press 1. Michigan state 19 (6-0) 473
DETROIT-Don Ohl poured in DETROIT-The Detroit Lions' 3.Nebraska 9 (6-0) 464
27 points to spark the Baltimore benching of quarterback Milt 4. Notre Dame (4-1) 346
Bullets to a 117-98 victory over Plum left fans wondering what 5. Louisiana state (5-1). 230
the crippled Detroit Pistons last Coach Harry Gilmer would, or 7. Florida (4-11) 201
night in a National Basketball could, do next. 8. Southern California (4-1-1) 93
Association game. The wait was briefb 9. Texas (4-2) 68
Gilmer followed up by remov- 10. Alabama (4-1-1) 62

quad which ended up seventh in
he conference with a 2-5 record.
Gridiron scholars' naturally were
hesitant about Wisconsin's chances
of ever matching that mark
against tough Big Ten competi-
ion.
Fate Again
However, as Fate would have it,
and Fate seems to be having a
winning season in reversing the
best of predictions, Milt Bruhn's
Badgers already have racked up
two conference victories against
one loss and are actually in a
position whereby they conceivably
could tie for or win the title.
How's that for openers?
Bruhn, ten-year veteran of the
Big Ten coaching ranks, is the
type of guy who doesn't like losing,
even when he's tabbed as a hope-
ess underdog. Witness his 51-38
career record and only three sec-
ond-division conference finishes.
So the former Minnesota grid-
der began putting together the
pieces of the jigsaw puzzle. His
best bet seemed to be emphasis on
the defense with ten defensive
players among the returnees.
Mammoth Line
And what Wisconsin lacked in:
experience, itacompensated for in
size. Left tackle Bill Maselter
weighed in at 244 pounds, and he
anchored a hefty defensive line-
a line which will outweigh Mich-
igan this week by 16 pounds per
man.
In last week's game with Ohio
State, which defensive backfield
coach Don Dufek scouted for
Michigan, the Badger defense-gave
an indication of its capabilities.
"Twice the offense relinquished
the ball in very poor field posi-
tion-deep in Wisconsin territory,
and twice the defense held Ohio
State," praised Dufek.
Some of the other "big guys" up
front include Mike London, 6'2",
233 pounds; Tom Domres, 62",
229 pounds; Eric Rice, 6'4%A", 217

tion, with 13 pass interceptions
on his record.
On the receiving end of his:
tosses have been two sophs, Den-
nis Lager and Bill Fritz, and sen-
ior Lou Jung. All three are tied
for the team lead in scoring with!
12 points each.
Jung and Lager have hauled in:
19 of Burt's air-borne heaves1

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-Daily-Jim Lines
THROUGH A GAPING HOLE Carl Ward churns out key yardage
against California. Michigan blockers cleared a wide path for
Ward, but face a stern test this Saturday when they encounter
Wisconsin's mammoth defensive line, which averages over 220
pounds.

Game Films
Films of the Minnesota game
will be shown this evening at
7:3 in room 130 of the Business
Administration Bldg. W a 11 y
Weber will be the narrator.
apiece, while Fritz, deceptively
fast at 225 pounds, has grabbed
17. The entirerconglomeration of
Badger receivers have combined
for an average gain of 9.3 yards
per play.
Aerial Emphasis}
Wisconsin started the campaign
with a lopsided concentration on
the aerial end of the game, there-
by losing the effectiveness of a
balanced attack. "The offensive
backs were used mainly for block-
ing and the defensive line was
falling back to cover the passes,"
commented Dufek.
"Against Northwestern, though,
the Badgers tried a more potent
running game with quite a bit of
success, evidenced by their 21-7
triumph."
Tom Jankowski, junior fullback,
has carried the brunt of the rush-
ing assignments with 193 yards
on 50 carries. Dufek describes him
as a "powerful runner, although
not especially fast."
Giving him support has been
Tom Schinke, another sophomore,

who has carried the pigskin 32
times for a net yardage of 102.
I-Formation
' Wisconsin also uses an I-for-
mation in which the flankerback
drops back for the handoff," ex-
plained Dufek. Jesse Kaye has
been employed as the ground-
gainer in this pattern.
The Badgers have little to offer
in their kicking game, with only
one field goal *to their credit all
season. Kaye has booted six of
seven attempts through the up-
rights in P.A.T's, however.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
RICK FEFERMAN
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pounds; Rodger Alberts, 6', 221
pounds; and Bob Richter, 6', 217
pounds.
"When they run out on the field
before gametime, they look real
impressive," said Dufek. "They're
big enough to be pros."
Pilfering Secondary
In the defensive secondary the
Badgers are led by team captain
Dave Fronek, a senior who plays
right safety. Fronek has snagged
four enemy aerials this season in-
cluding one which he ran back
for 66 yards. In addition, he also
handles punting chores. Dufek
rates him as "a fine leader, com-
petent in his role of protecting
against pass plays."
The Wisconsin backfield has in-
tercepted a total of- 12 tosses in
six games.
But the Badgers are not with-

0'
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9

out their share of problems. A
nistake-prone offense hindered by
njuries and inexperience (sounds
amiliar?) has been the thorn in
he side of Bruhn and his crew.
"Wisconsin has a young team,"
xplained Dufek, "and their quar-
terback '~and two of the ends are
sophomores."
Redshirt QB
Doing the signal calling has
been Chuck Burt, a "redshirt" who
ias a status of sophomore on the
gridiron, but who practiced with
the varsity last year. A bout with
mononucleosis shelved him before
he had an opportunity to see any
game action.
According to Dufek, "Burt is a
scrambler and a fine passer who
throws a lot and is becoming skill-
ed at the option roll-out play."
This season he has completed
82 passes in 171 attempts for 759
yards and four touchdowns-not
exactly sending out smoke signals
to the pro scouts but still a threat.
His chief nemisis has been the
defensive backfield of the opposi-

Anyone can

GRID SELECTIONS b
For all you sadists, we saved this interesting sidelight from the
Associated Press: "Ken Love, sports writer for the Olathe, Kan., News
has been hung in effigy for making a wrong football prediction. Last,
week, he picked Edgerton, Kan., High School to lose its game to
Linwood, Kan. Edgerton won, 26-20, and an effigy' of Love was
hung in the small northwest Kansas town over the weekend."
Now, we still urge you to enter our famed grid picks contest,
but we must institute one restriction: anyone caught hanging Lloyd
Graff in effigy (or even in Ann Arbor) will be disqualified from
winning the two free tickets to the Michigan Theater, currently,
showing "The Ipcress File."
If you can control your sanguinary tendencies, you may pick
up an entry blank at the Daily, 420 Maynard Street. They must be
entered by midnight Friday. r
1. 1Wi c. 1i t MIIGAN 11K t Knncne

BEST DEALS ON '66
Mustangs-Falcons-Fords
USED CARS-ALL MAKES
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I

...........

____

1. wscons n atijurjvt%
(pick score)
2. Purdue at Illinois
3. Iowa at Indiana
4. Northwestern at Mich. State
5. Minnesota at Ohio State
6. Nebraska at Missouri
7. Rice at Texas Tech
8. Florida at Auburn
9. Texas at SMU
10. LSU vs. Mississippi at Jackson

i. nansas date at iansas
12. Duke at Georgia Tech
13. Georgia at North Carolina
14. Colorado at Oklahoma
15. Penn State at California
16. Stanford at Washington
17. Texas Christian at Baylor
18. Maryland at South Carolina
19. West Virginia at Kentucky
20. Nebraska Wesleyan at
William Jewell College

The Bullets,led jby Walt Bel-
lamy's 10 points, jumped to an
early 29-17 lead. After Detroit
cut the gap to 34-27 in the sec-
ond period, Ohl and Wayne High-
tower cut loose with 10 and seven
points, respectively, to lift Balti-
more into a 62-48 halftime com-
mand.
The Pistons, playing without
guard Rod Thorn, suffering from
an ankle .injury, and getting little
service from player-Coach Dave
DeBusschere and Ray Scott,
bothered by thigh and shoulder'
ailments, came' through with the
first two points of the second half
before Ohl hit two quick baskets
and killed any Detroit hopes.
Inept free throw shooting didn't
help the Pistons, who went down
to . their third defeat in four
games. They made only one of
their first 14 from the charity
line and wound up the game with
20 successes in 40 attempts.
.Bellamy ,had 21 and' Bailey
Howell 19 points for Baltimore,
now 2-3 in the young NBA season.
Don Kojis headed Detroit with
15 points.

ing Nick Pietrosante as starting
fullback and replacing him with
Amos Marsh.
The Lions' boss, disturbed over
three straight defeats, made both
moves yesterday-taking opt Plum
for the Los Angeles Rams' game
next Sunday and replacing him
with newcomer George Izo, a five-
year National Football League
veteran.
Gilmer said he had decided to
give Plum a rest and "see what
Izo can do." Izo, former Notre
Dame player, was obtained from
the Washington Redskins this
year in a trade.
In his NFL career Izo, 27, has
been mostly a spare quarterback.
The benching of Plum was one of
numerous ups and downs for the
30-year-old veteran.
With the departure of Earl Mor-
rall to the New York Giants, it
had been assumed Plum had the
signal calling job for Detroit a'
cinch to himself.
Marsh's replacement of Pietro-
sante registered as a surprise, too.
But after the crushing 38-10 de-
feat from the Chicago Bears any
thing might have happened.

UNIVERSITY CHARTER-MICHIGAN
AGAIN PRESENTS
1966 SUMMER CHARTER FLIGHTS
~FLTOEUROPE
FLIGHT NO. 1 CALEDONIAN FLIGHT NO. 2
Det.-Lon. May 4 AIRWAYS Det.-Lon. May 21
Lon.-Det. June 16 Lon.-Det. Aug. 15
$2 00.JET-PROP $26000
$2500 BRITANNIA 2
roundtrip roundtrip
FOR INFORMATION, CALL OR WRITE
MR. ERIC RHODEHAMBL-Phone 761-2348 (6-8 p.m. M-F)
609 So. Fifth-Ann Arbor
CALEDONIAN AIRWAYS HOLDS TRANS - ATLANTIC CHARTER LICENSES
FROM BOTH CIVIL AERONAUTICS BOARD AND THE BRITISH AIR MINISTRY.

AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
663-8300h
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
-Motorcycle running poorly
Need a tune-up
Need a complete overhaul
or just an oil change
Yamaha tune-up $10.00 on
Twins plus parts
Yamaha overhaul $40.00 on
Twins pius parts
Triumph tune-up Twins $12.50
plus parts
BMW tune-up Twins $12.50
plus parts
-Complete shop facilities ('Valve
grinding and cylinder reboring)
-All work guaranteed
-Nicholson M/C Sales
224 So. First-Phone 662-7409
-Yamaha World Grand Prix
Champion (250 c.c.)

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333
399

#4

and
present
DW0IGHT MACDONALD
Noted critic and author of
Memoirs of a Revolutionary and
Against the American Grain

I

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