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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 21, 1965 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, OCTOBER. 21, 1965

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. OCTOBER 21, 1965

Michigan
By STEVE FICK one ne
more a
Saturday, Michigan will clash with b
with the Golden Gophers of Min- dition.
nesota in the 56th round of a fight Buti
for what is probably the best whenf
known football trophy in the what t:
country-the Little Brown Jug. Keene
They will be fighting for a piece
of pottery whose history dates
back to 1903, a year in whichTyI
Cobb was still grubbing it as a
minor leaguer, a crank in Dear-
born ignored comments by Uni-1
versity engineering professors that
the internal combustion engine
was "entirely impractical" and
kept on tinkering with his quadri-
cycles, and women wore their
skirts at their ankles with shoes
that went halfway to their knees Thet
-instead of the other way around. begani
Juggled Description Monda
The Jug was neither little nor football
brown-it holds five gallons of na- Swim
ture's finest and was originally tling w
colored sort of putty gray - when Thei
the whole thing started-but that is five
is not important now, since no counter
Earl R
murals,
bad we
of ma
were n
darkne
The most be dro
progra
walked about started
slacks on This
ticipate
Campus are indepen
HUBBARDmore in
ed pers
slacks with at the
I CThou
"DACRON" jvarsity
and us
Great Hubbard styling with that is
the lasting neatness and there i
care-free comfort of "Da- pads a
intrami
cron", in these slacks of signed
55% Dacron* polyester, 45% mum.
worsted wool. Styled irf tra- effectiv
ditional Classic and Gay injurie
Blade plain front models,
in all the favorite colors, at Thef
better stores everywhere. I-M foo
Also available in blends of Only b
70% Orlon* acrylic, 30%
worsted wool, or "Dacron"
with "Orlon".
*du Pont Reg. T.M.
An
whent
home R
4 Th
the or:
their k
tion 1
Heads,
superio
Wl
games
':j; Publica
Michig
& 1 a

To Battle for 'Bottle"St.L Dealsy

eds it to carry water any
nd it has been painted over
own and blue to suit tra-
it was important in 1903,
football ethics were not
hey are now, and trainer
Fitzpatrick of Michigan,

fearing that Minnesota forces
might put a little something ex-
tra into the drinking water they
| were expected to supply Michigan
with, asked student manager Tom-
my Robe'ts to go to a Minneap-
olis drug store the morning of
the game and buy a jug that he

himself could fill for the team's Tt
use during the game. For 30c,
Roberts bought the jug-and an
immortality of sorts. ST. LOUIS (P-Third baseman
Left Behind Ken Boyer, the National League's

,kson, Smith

11Fobl:Game
Mme Only in Name

.By JOHN SUTKUS
intramural sports program
its schedule of fall sports
y with the start of I-M
I season.
ming, handball, and wres-
ill soon follow.
intramural football season
weeks behind its varsity
part because of softball.
Ziskey, Director of Intra-
, explained, "This year's
ather caused postponement
ny softball games. Others
iot completed because of
ss. Next year softball will
pped from the intramural
m, and football will be
much earlier."
Room for More
year 200 teams will par-
ein football, including 24
ndent teams. There are
ndependent teams. Interest-
ons should contact Riskey
I-M Bldg.
gh I-M football and the
game share the same name
e the same type of ball,
where similarity ends. Since
s no equipment, such as
and helmets, used in the
ural sport, the rules are de-
to keep injuries to a mini-
The rules now used are very
ve, as there were very few
s last year.
One Hand Touch
first difference in rules in=
stopping the ball carrier. In
totbail there is no tackling.
touching the ball carrier

with one hand anywhere between'
the shoulder and the knee is re-
quired. However, a "tackler" may
not leave his feet to make the
stop. Neither are players allowed
to leave their feet when blocking.
Players are not allowed to take
the, three-point stance.
There is no charging the punt-
er. The kicking team announces
its intention to punt and must
punt to the opposing team.
Passer's Heaven
Any player on the field is an
eligible pass receiver. The passer,,
of course, must throw from be-
hind the line of scrimmage.
Once the ball hits the ground it
is dead. This rule prevents play-
ers, piling on a loose football,
which often causes injuries.
In order to prevent "sleeper"
plays, the offensive team is re-
quired to huddle after each play.
Shorter Field
The field used in intramural
football is somewhat different
than. the varsity field. The I-Mt
field is 60 yards long, divided into
three 20-yard playing zones. The
end zones are ten yards deep. In
order to get a first down a team
must cross from one - 20-yard
playing zone into another in four
downs or less.
Scoring is virtually the same as'
in regular football, except that
there are no goalposts. Six points
are awarded for a touchdown. All
PAT attempts are single plays
originating from the three-yard
line.

For when the game, which end-
ed in a 6-6 tie as 30,000 fans
stormed onto the field with two
minutes left on the clock, was
over, the jug was left behind. Two
days later, janitor Oscar Munson
picked it up and took it to the
athletic building, thinking of re-
turning it to Michigan.
The authorities thought other-
wise. "We have your Little Brown
Jug, come and win it back," they,
wrote Michigan.
Michigan-though it was not
until six years later-did just that,
and not until 1919 was a Min-
nesota squad able to claim vic-
tory and the Jug from the Wol-
verines. In the years since 1903,
Michigan has rolled up a 33-19-
3 edge in the battle for the jug.
Who Needed It?
Was it really necessary for Rob-
erts, who later was awarded the
University's Distinguished Service
Medal, to buy the thing in the
first place?
Certainly the fact that this
was one of Fielding Yost's "point
a minute" teams-at 565 points
for 12 games in 1903 the mon-
icker was no idle boast - could
have been expected to encourage
Minnesota to try something out
of the ordinary against Michigan.
And it's a fact that play dur-
ing the game itself was so brutal
that day that the two schools sus-
pended athletic relations until
1909.
In any case, the jug will be
rooted out of this year's storage
space in Yost Field House-the'
jug the schools display in their
trophy cases is a replica - in
time to be flown with the team
to Minneapolis, there to be used
in the annual post-game victory
pictures.
And, if.things go well, Michigan
will be able to bring the jug home
again for the second year in a row.

most valuable- player in 1964
when he led St. Louis to the world
championship, was traded by the
Cardinals yesterday to the New
York Mets.
The Cardinals received third
baseman Charley Smith and left-
handed pitcher Al Jackson in the
trade, which may be the forerun-
ner of a house-cleaning by the
Redbirds, who finished a disap-
pointing seventh last season.
Plus Farm Hand
The Cardinals also must give
up an unnamed triple A player to
complete the deal.
Boyer, suffering from a back
injury much of the season, was
one of the biggest of the Cardinal
disappointments in 1965. The 34-
year-old Boyer slumped to a .260
batting average, batted in only 75
runs and hit 13 home runs.
Just one year earlier, he led the
Cardinals to their first pennant
in 18 years, hitting .295 with 24
homers and a league-leading 119
RBI.
Smith, 22, hit .244 this past
season for the Mets, had 62 RBI
and 16 home runs.

Jackson. 29, has won more
games for the Mets than any other
pitcher in the team's four-year
history-40. Last season he won
eight and lost 20.
Boyer, who has been named to
the All-Star team seven times, has
spent all of his 11 major league
seasons with the Cardinals.
One of the league's best fielding
third basemen, he also normally
batted in the clean-up spot and
formed the Cardinals' one-two
punch with Stan Musial and then
Bill White.
1000 RBI
Boyer has hit 255 home runs
and driven in 1,001 runs. His ca-
reer batting average is just under
.300.
Last season was Smith's second
with the Mets. He hit .239 in 1964,
slammed 20 homers and drove in
58 runs in 127 games.
pJackson, a little guy at 5-foot-9,
163 pounds, features a fast ball
and sharp breaking curve. His
best year was 1963 when he was
13-17 with a 3.96 earned run
average.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM LaSOVAGE

Ofv

RID SLETONJ
age-old rivalry will be renewed on the gridiron this Saturday
the powerful Appalachian State Mountaineers defend their
ort in Boone, N.C., against the Eagles of mighty Carson-New-
is grudge battle will be part of a series begun in 1803, when
iginal Carson-Newman brothers, Kit and Harry, challenged'
infolk from across the Blue Ridge to a debate on the legaliza-
f marijuana. The Eagles, affectionately known as the Pot-
won that one and are favored to maintain their light-headed
rity again this year.
hat do you think? Try your hand at picking this and 19 otherI
this week in The Daily contest. Fill out a form at the Student
ations Bldg. at 420 Maynard St. and win two tickets to the
an Theatre, now showing "La Boheme."
THIS WEEK'S GAMES

I-M Announcements
SKATING SCHEDULE
Hours have been announced
for public skating this week at
the University of Michigan
Coliseum. The Coliseum, locat-
ed on Hoover street across from
Wines Field, will be open today
from 10 a.m. to noon, and Sat-
urday from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
HOCKEY
I-M Director Earl Riskey has
announced that two more ice
hockey teams are needed to fill
out a ten-team league. Contact
Riskey at the I-M Bldg. with-
in the next 10 days if inter-
ested.
HANDBALL, SQUASH
Entrants are needed for two
I-M individual tournaments,
handball and squash (singles
only). Both meets are sched-
uled to begin Nov. 1.
BEST DEALS ON '66
Mustangs-Falcons-Fords
USED CARS-ALL MAKES
SEE OR CALL
JOHN HARRISON
oat
Henderson Ford Soles, 662-3261

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The Gretsch Folk Guitar is the
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Til WXTA AXT -t AN.----t-

1. MICHIGAN at Minnesota
(pick score)
2. Ohio State at Wisconsin
3. Michigan State at Purdue
4. Duke at Illinois
5. Washington St. at Indiana
6. Iowa at Northwestern
7. Florida St. at.Alabama
8. Utah St. at Colorado St.
9. Miami (Fla.) at Pittsburgh
10. Navy at Georgia Tech

11. Southern Cal at Notre Dame
12. Washington vs. Oregon at
Portland
13. Vanderbilt at Mississippi
14., Army at Stanford
15. Massachusetts at Boston U.
16. Texas Christian at Clemson
17. West Virginia at Penn State
18. Houston at Tennessee
19. Colgate at Brown
20. Carson-Newman at
Appalachian St.

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AT LAST!
THE NINE
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STRAUSS-
Don Quixote
MOZART-
Symphony 33 and
Divertimento No. 2
DVORAK-Slavonic Dances
SCHUBERT-
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ii

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