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October 20, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-20

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1965

THE MICHIGAN4>. SWAS[IX

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11 V l 111!"1\ ,A11f i J.ly

PAGE THREE

r,

Burundian

Premier

Shot

As African Revolt Crushed,

<4

Rebels Kill
Dominican
EX-Minister
Carcia-Godoy Closes
All Radio Stations To
Stop Public Disorder
SANTO DOMINGO (M)-A battle
raged yesterday between rebel
snipers and Dominican troops in
the heart of Santo Domingo.
At least two persons were killed
and five wounded.
Wounded
Among the wounded was Rober-
to Mitchell Daniel, 30, a Domini-
can cameraman working for the
American Broadcasting Co. Doc-
tdrs described his shoulder wound
as serious.
Angel Severo Cabral, who serv-
ed as interior minister of the
junta which ousted President Jaun
D. Bosch in 1963, was shot to
the formerly rebel-held sector to
the formely rebel-held sector to
remove furniture from his home
there. His wife and their daughter
Ada, 26, were wounded.
Emergency Session
' President Hector Garcia-Godoy
went into an emergency session
with his cabinet. He quickly de-
creed the shutdown of all radio
stations in the city except the
government outlet and another
operated by the Organization of
American States.
Rebel civilian partisans firing
from rooftops and doorways open-
ed up early yesterday on Domini-
can troops in Ozama fortress in
the eastern end of the downtown
district near the harbor. A bat-
talion of tank-led anti-guerrilla
specialists moved into the fortress

Source of
Rebel Force
,Unidentified
Rifles, Mortars Shell
Royal Palace, Army
Barracks in Capital
LEOPOLDVILLE (P)-A sudden
flash revolt against the king of
the new central African nation of
Burundi apparently has been
crushed, reports from its capital
said last night, but its premier was
reported near death from wounds.
The predawn quiet of the na-
tion's capital, Bujumbura, was
shattered by rifle and mortar fire
in the area of the royal palace
and the Burundi army barracks,
the reports said, in an attempt by
still unidentified rebels to seize
the nation. Six Burundians were
reported killed in the palace
grounds.
Mwambutsa Hiding
At that moment, according to
messages from an aide, the con-
stitutional monarch, King Mwam-
butsa IV, was in hiding. The aide
said that two hours later loyalist
forces encircled the palace and
the king was under loyalist pro-
tection.
The premier, Leopold Biha, was
reported wounded in the head and
chest by gunfire as he left his
home in an attempt to reach the
palace. The messages said that he
was taken to a hospital where he
was reported in a coma and in
grave condition.
The secretary of state for de-
fense, Michael Micomboro, was
reported missing.

-Associated Press
THE BODY OF A VIET CONG lies on the ground near a river after he was killed during a battle
with U.S. Marines in the Due Bo village complex in South Viet Nam.
Bombs, PropaLanda Released
In Sporadic Viet Nvam Activity

Protest
Absences
Lowe red
Milwaukee Pupils
Continue Racial
Planned Boycott
MILWAUKEE (P)-Absenteeism
in Milwaukee public schools drop-
ped substantially yesterday on the
second day of a civil rights boy-
cott that leaders said would run
at least two more days.
In a related development a Ro-
man Catholic priest who had play-
ed a leading role in the protest
movement was ordered by his su-
periors to cease the activity. He
said he would obey.
Absences Decrease
School officials said a total of
10,074 pupils of a total city en-
rollment of 122,495 were absent
yesterday, compared with 12,673
Monday-a decrease of 2,563. The
number absent was about 4,756
above normal.
In the city's "inner core" where
the boycott was concentrated, a
total of 5,777 were absent, 5,419
over the daily average for Sep-
tember.
State Assemblyman Lloyd A.
Barbee, head of the Milwaukee
United School Integration Com-
mittee, sponsoring the boycott to
dramatize racial imbalance in the
schools, had already stamped the
demonstration a success.
Freedom
"Freedom" schools, set up by
the boycott committee as substi-
tute classrooms for participating
pupils, settled into routine yes-
terday, but side issues, religious
and otherwise continued to seethe.
The Rev. Groppi, assistant pas-
tor of St. Boniface Roman Catho-
lic church and vice-chairman of
the boycott committee, said he
had been ordered by his superiors
to cease his activity in the pro-
test. St. Boniface is about 75 per
cent Negro.
"I have been told to desist from
boycott activities," he told news-
men. "Of course, I am going to
obey."
Facilities Banned
Auxiliary Bishop Roman R. At-
kielski had banned use of Cath-
olic Church facilities for "free-
dom" schools, citing the ruling of
Dist. Atty. Hugh R. O'Connell
that the boycott was illegal.
But Father Groppi led chil-
dren in "freedom" songs and out-
side his church lectured at "free-
dom" schools.
Monday night he led a group
of approximately 300 youngsters
and teenagers in a march to the
home of the school board presi-
dent, John S. Foley, where a noisy,
but orderly, demonstration was
held.
The picketing at the Foley home
provoked an angry blast from Mil-
waukee Mayor Henry Maier who
called it "a kind of bigotry" and
said it "almost smacks of Ku
Klux Klanism in reverse."
"In my opinion," the mayor
said in a statement, "the Milwau-
kee civil rights movement com-
mitted a self-defeating mistake. I
can never condone the organized
harassment of a man and his
family in his home-regardless of
whether the family is white or
Negro.

-As
Little card.
Big convenience.
There's one reserved for you.
Pick it up today.
1112 South University
hT

late yesterddy to protect
guarding the docks.
This is believed to have
ed rebel partisans who
capture the fortress early
revolution in April.
The dead apparently
caught in the crossfire.

U U

troops
arous-
helped
in the
were

SAIGON VP) - U.S. B52 jet
bombers from Guam struck yes-
terday a suspected Viet Cong in-
stallation in the Ho Bo woods, 30
miles northwest of Saigon.
Other sporadic action was going
on throughout Viet Nam.
A military spokesman announc-
ed North Vietnamese gunners shot
down an F4C Phantom fighter-
bomber over a bridge 40 miles
west of Vinh on Monday and its
two crewmen were presumed cap-
tured.
Phantom Lost
Five American raiders had been
lost over the weekend in accelerat-
ed strikes against Red targets in
the North. The Phantom was the
115th plane to be officially writ-
ten off in the 8-month-old cam-
paign against North Viet Nam.
South of the border, a search
was ordered for two craft. A U.S.
Air Force observation plane carry-
ing two Americans; and a South
Vietnamese helicopter with an un-
determined number of men aboard
-overdue at the Da Nang airbase.

They had taken off from the Kham
Duc area of the central highlands
for Da Nang, 380 miles northwest
of Saigon.
Propaganda Raid.
Strikes against North Viet Nam
included a propaganda raid over
the Red River delta southeast of
Hanoi. Four U.S. Air Force F105
Thunderchiefs dropped 850,000
leaflets intended to undermine the
people's support of Ho Chi Minh's
Communist regime.
Two planes from the carrier In-
dependence hit a railway facility
about 60 miles north of the fron-
tier. Pilots said they sank a barge
and damaged three buildings.
Fourteen planes from the car-
rier Midway were among others
aloft. The pilots said they pounded
bridges and smashed 13 railroad
cars.
Ground Operations
In operations aground, soldiers
of the U.S. 1st Infantry Division
rounded up 115 suspects during a

sweep 25 miles north of Saigon.
A spokesman said five of these,
were identified as Viet Cong and
one. was killed when he tried to
escape.
Vietnamese government troops
operating in the northern coastal
provinces were reported to have
killed 53 Viet Cong and captured
23. Others, staging a raid in the
Mekong River delta, said they
killed 11 guerrillas.
A military spokesman said, how-
ever, the Viet Cong ambushed a
government squad in the North
and inflicted heavy casualties. The
phrasing suggested that the squad,
perhaps a dozen men, was virtual-
ly wiped out.
Hanoi Speaks
Hanoi continued to play up an-
tiwar demonstrations in the Unit-
ed States. North Viet Nam's of-
ficial paper Nhan Dan said in
a broadcast commentary they re-
flect "the high tide of the struggle
of the American people against
the Johnson administration's ag-
gression in Viet Nam."

Forces Undetermined
The palace aide said he
not determine whether the
neers were from police or

could
muti-
army

Stations Shut
Closing the radio stations was
necessary, the presidential decree
said, to prevent "the incitation
to public disorder." Some of the
stations, particularly the San Isid-
ro outlet of the Dominican armed
forces, have been caustic in their
comments on national political
developments.

WORLD NEWS ROUND-UP:
Jailed Destroyer of Draft Card Released

forces.
White families-Bujumbura has
a small European and Asian popu-
lation--were urged to stay off the
streets.
Burundi has been in a state of
unrest since May, when elections
resulted in increased strength for
forces opposed to the king. His
choice of Biha for premier was re-
garded as a compromise.
Political Rivalry
There has been intense political
rivalry between feudal leaders of
the Tutsi tribe, who have been in-
fluenced by Chinese Communists;
and the Western-educated "Young
Turks" of the Huto tribe in Bur-
undi, a former Belgian trust ter-
ritory which became independent
in July 1962.
Burundi once was considered a
hub of Red Chinese subversion
operations in central and east
Africa. Red China maintained a
greatly oversized embassy in the
little nation until lastsJanuary,
when King Mwambutsa expelled
the Chinese diplomats, accusing
them of using Burundi as a base
to export rebellion in the neigh-
boring Congo with arms, money
and propaganda.
First Reports
The first fragmentary reports
of the uprising had come from the
Brussels radio in Belgium which
had said that the king fled to the
neighboring Congo and urged the
Congolese air force to attack reb-
els who already had beaten their
way into the palace. Apparently,
however, the king remained in his
capital.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERS
CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
FOR GRADUATE ENGINEERS IN THE
GRAPHIC ARTS FIELD
* PRODUCT DESIGN
* CUSTOMER SERVICE
* SALES
* MANUFACTURING
We offer challenging positions in the above areas
to qualified technically trained men who desire a
future with a well established progress-orientated
organization.
Miehle - Goss - Dexter, Inc., is the world's largest
manufacturer - distributor of printing presses and
associated graphic arts machinery. The Miehle
Division is the world's leading producer of sheet
fed presses for commercial printers and lithograph-
ers, book and magazine printers, label printers,
carton plants and printing departments of large
businesses.
Our representative will be on your campus
Thursday, October 21. Arrange an inter-
view through the Placement Office or mail
your resume to:
MR. WILLIAM L. KEOGH
Assistant Personnel Manager
THE MIEHLE COMPANY
DIV. OF MIEHLE-GOSS-DEXTER, INC.
2011 W.AHASTINGS STREET
CHICAGO 8, ILLINOIS
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

By The Associated Press
MANCHESTER, N.H.--David J.
Miller, 22, of Syracuse, N.Y.,
charged with destroying his draft
card 'as a protest against U.S.
military involvement in Viet Nam,
was released in $500 bail from
Hillsboro County Jail yesterday.
A federal grand jury in New
York City indicted Miller for
knowingly mutilating and destroy-
ing a Selective Service card.
** *
BOGOTA, Colombia-Antiguer.
rilla troops killed eight Commun-
ist bandits and wounded four
others yesterday in a battle still
continuing in the soaring Colom-
bian Andes, 350 miles southwest
of Bogota, an army spokesman
mk said.
He added that three soldiers
were killed in the fierce fight that
broke out when the troops caught
up with the guerrilla band led by
"Sureshot" Tirofijo.
The army said 26 of Tirofijo's
guerrillas have been killed and
15 captured in a series of run-
ning engagements that began Sa-
turday between the pursuing army
units and the bandits.
It was estimated that Tirofijo's
band includes about 120 guerrillas.

FORT WORTH-A member of
the Atomic Energy Commission
said yesterday it will be several
months before the current list of
86 proposed sites for a $300-,
million atomic reactor will be re-
duced.
Commissioner James T. Ramey
said a National Academy of
Sciences committee screening the
86 sites has not indicated when
its recommendations will be sent
to the AEC.
,' * '
WASHINGTON - P r e s i d e n t
Johnson spent his busiest day
since his operation yesterday-
walking more than a mile, work-
ing on official business, including
signing 22 bills, going to his den-
tist and reporting he felt "pretty
good."
* * *
CELINA, Ohio-A judge ruled
yesterday that it is all right for
Roman Catholic nuns to teach
in Ohio public schools, but that
it is unconstitutional to release
students during school of religious
instruction.
The ruling by Common Pleas
Judge Fred Cramer came in a suit
filed two years ago by Jesse C.
Moore of nearby Fort Recovery
against the Southwest Local

School District in that predomi-
nantly Catholic area near the In-
diana state line.
BERLIN-The Warsaw Pact na-
tions officially opened joint mili-
tary maneuvers in East Germany
yesterday with a political demon-
stration at the Buchenwald con-
centration camp memorial near
Weimar in Thuringia.
WASHINGTON - The State
Department confirmed yesterday
that Laszlo Szabo, 42, a Hungar-
ian diplomat stationed in London,
has asked for political asylum in
the United States.

HAYNEVILLE, Ala. - State-
ments by pr ospective jurors that
they regard white civil rights
workers as inferior broughtan-
other delay yesterday in a Ku
Klux Klansman's murder trial.
The trial of Collie Leroy Wilk-
ins Jr. for the slaying of a white
Detroit housewife who had taken
part in a civil rights struggle, was
recessed for 24 hours to give state's
attorneys time to appeal to the
State Supreme Court,
Atty. Gen. Richmond Flowers,
prosecutor, planned to ask the Su-
preme Court for an immediate
hearing to decide whether the
jurors' statements can be used to
disqualify them.

I

THIS WEEK
WED.-TH U RS.-FRI.
"Sex spells for the student more than glandu-
lar release. It signifies being with a person as
a person, naked in the psychological sense
more than the physical sense. The gentleman
student of yesteryear may not have needed
such rock-bottom experience and assurance
that it is possible to be human. But today's
student does if he is to stand up to 'the pres-
sures and demands of his academic life."
-Hans Hofmann, "Sex & Students:
A Plea for Honesty," article
in THE CHURCH REVIEW,
Vol XXII, No. 2/3.
WEDNESDAY NOON LUNCHEON
BOOK DISCUSSION:
Hofmann will discuss the above article.
12:00 Noon, Michigan League, Rm. 2

HANS HOFMANN, Th.D.
Writer and Lecturer in Theology and Psy-
chology of Religion; Sometime Professor of
Harvard Divinity School; presently Executive
Director, Center for the Study of Personality
and Culture, Inc., Cambridge, Mass.

44

CAMPUS-PAC
DISTRIBUTION
THIS WEEK AT

THDE ANN ARBOR VIETNAM DAY COMMITTEE
is conducting a campaign to aid in paying
the fines of those demonstrators who con-
ducted civil disobedience as their expres-
sion of protest against our government's
policies in Vietnam.
DONATIONS OF ANY SIZE
WILL BE GRATEFULLY WELCOMED.
PLEASE MAKE CHECKS OUT TO CASH OR
A. JEROME DUPONT (FOR FINES)

WEDNESDAY EVENING: 8 P.M.
Hofmann will meet on an informal
basis with any and all interested
students at The Canterbury House,
218 North Division St.

51

SERIES of 4 UNIVERSITY LECTURES:
"Religion-Forward or Backward"

State Street at North University

Wed., 4:15 P.M.
-rY -- A - G M l

"Religion as a Worldview"
/t~ w f -0 V 0 . 0

i

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