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October 19, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-19

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TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TFIREE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 196~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Defecting

Viet Cong Reveals

ReasonsI

EDITOR'S NOTE: Reporters in
Viet Nam seldom get to interview
a Viet Cong defector before he is
handed on to higher authorities for
intelligence debriefings. Hugh Mul-
ligan, hunting for stories nearnthe
Cambodian border," talked for near-
ly an hour with a North Vietna-
mese officer.
By HUGH A. MULLIGAN
Associated Press News Analyst
GIA NGHIA, South Viet Nam-
Dang Van Trong, a Viet Cong
second lieutenant, came out of
the jungles on a steaming hot day
recently with a few dried beans
clutched in his hand.
For him the war was over. He
had had it.
Lt. Trong had been walking for
three months and four days. An
infiltrator from North Viet Nam,
he left a staging area above the
17th Parallel with a platoon of
28 men. Only 18 were left. Ten had
died in the past week, four of
starvation.
That, in statistical form, was

Trong's story. How much he held
back or how much he invented
can only be ascertained by trained
intelligence teams.
Trong said his orders were to
get his men to Zone D, a vast
jungle area 100 miles wide and 60
miles deep. Government troops
have penetrated only its fringes.
The Viet Cong is suspected to be
staging a massive troop buildup
there with fresh units infiltrated
from the North. But Trong, a
North Vietnamese regular, never
got there.
Instead, he slipped away from
his men in the dense jungles of
Quang Duc Province, somehow
made his way to Route 14, walked
into the nearest Montagnard vil-
lage, and gave himself up.
The Montagnards passed Trong
onto Gia Nghia, the province cap-
ital, where he was treated kindly
while waiting to be shipped on to

corps headquarters at Pleiku for
extensive questioning.
Although he never heard of the
expression, Trong was treated as
a "chieu hoi"-received with open
arms, which is what the program
means in Vietnamese. The gov-
ernment's chieu hoi is designed to
encourage defectors.
Why had he decided to defect?
Trong said he was hungry and
tired and disenchanted. He said
he had been led to believe at least
four-fifths of the people of South
Viet Nam were friendly to the
Communist cause. But he found
himself walking for weeks with-
out being allowed to talk with
anyone, friendly or unfriendly.
Some observers of the war doubt
there is such a thing as the
so-called Ho Chi Minh Trail, the
series of trails through Laos and
Cambodia for infiltrating men and
supplies into South Viet Nam.

Trong had never heard it called
by that name, but he said he
crossed the border into Laos three
miles above the 17th Parallel,
walked south through Laos and
Cambodia, then crossed into South
Viet Nam in Darlac Province.
There his real troubles began.
His 28-man platoon was part
of a force of more than 400 being
infiltrated at that time, he .said.
He never saw any of the others,
because each platoon moves sep-
arately through the jungles, and
is passed from station to station.
The stations, Trong said, were
always two days apart. Each sta-
tion knew where the unit was
heading next, and so directed
them, but never knew where they
came from. The lieutenant found
such security procedures strange
in a country where he had been
led to believe the Communists
were overwhelmingly popular.
Air Force and Navy bombers
have been pounding the jungles

with air strikes for months to pre-
vent mass Communist infiltrations.
The jungles abound in fresh'
fruits and wild edible plants, but
the lieutenant's platoon found
themselves slowly starving - to
death. After a lifetime of eating
rice, the jungle food made them
sick. Malaria and dysentery killed
siv of his men.
Trong used to hoard his few
handfuls of beans and dry rice
to keep his men from trying to
jump him and steal his fast
dwindling supplies. The few beans
he had when he walked out on
Route 14 were all the food he had
left.
The platoon was under orders'
never to fight. Their assignment
was to get to Zone D and avoid
contact with the enemy before
getting there. They never dared
shoot a deer or kill a lizard or
snake to eat, lest government'
forces find their campfire or dis-
cover a carcass.

The lieutenant had gone north
to join the Communist cause after
the armistice with the French in
1954, but he said he was now 32,
wiser and weary of war.
He spoke in an abstract way,
as if it no longer concerned him,
about the island of Hainon in
the Gulf of Tonkin. He had .been
told that 200,000 Chinese troops
were waiting there to join the war.
No one had told him that the U.S.
7th Fleet was in the gulf waiting
for that possibility.
He spoke of a Hanoi' factory
where machine guns and mortars
were stamped with Chinese mark-
ings as they came off the assem-
bly line, so that people in the
South would get the idea that
China was supporting the war in
a big way.
Finally, he spoke of the jungles
where his friends had died and
his cause had vanished, and he
said he never wanted to see those
dense rain forests again.

NEWMAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
CATHOLIC VOICES SERI ES
SENATOR PHILIP HART
"A CHRISTIAN VIEW OF POLITICS"
Friday, Oct. 22-Angell Hall
8:00 P.M.-Aud. A

...

...........

P

i

Indonesia
4CommuniQ'

Mobilizes
4t Purge

World Ne'ws Roundup

UAC Presents
MOVIES on
THE LATE PETER HOWARD
called "TheBest Friend America Has"
Leading proponent of
MORAL REARMAMENT
7:15 P.M. 3rd floor
Tonight Conference Rm., Union

SINGAPORE M) - Indonesia's
army imposed a military ban on
the Communist party in Jakarta,
said a broadcast yesterday from
the capital. But President Su-
karno was reported resisting mil-
itary pressure to dissolve the par-
ty.
A Jakarta broadcast said a
number of parties and organiza-
tions linked to the Communist
party also were placed under the
ban and the powerful, Commu-
nist-dominated trade union -feder-
ation, Sobsi, was outlawed, pre-
sumably throughout Indonesia.
The Indonesian army continued
its crackdown on Communists be-
lieved involved in the Sept. 30-
Oct. 1 coup attempt against Su-
karno despite the president's ap-
peal to the military to desist.
A dispatch from Jakarta report-
ed the arrest of the suspended
Communist director of the govern-
ment-run Jakarta radio, Sukir-
man.
Also reported arrested were Sat-
ya Graha, chief editor of the Na-
tionalist party paper Suluh In-
donesia, suspended by the army,
and four staff members of the of-
ficial news agency Antara.

Mobs were reported systemat-
ically burning and sacking Com-
munist offices in other parts of
the country.
Gen. Hadikasumo Speaks
The ban on the Communist par-
ty in Jakarta was announced in
the name of Gen. Umar Hadika-
sumo, commanding officer in the
'capital area. He ordered offi-
cials of the party and of the oth-
er banned organizations to re-
port to the army or police within
five days.
Hadikasumo said these officials
were involved in the coup attempt.
He gave no hint of the fate of
the Communist party in the rest
of the country.
Groups Banned
Also placed under the military
bane were Permuda Rakjat, the
Communist party youth wing, and
Gerwani, the party women's
branch.
The newly appointed army chief,
Maj. Gen. Suharto, in his first
order of the day released yester-
day, called on all army units "to
continue to liquidate remnants of
the counter revolutionary Sept. 30
movement." This is a reference
to the Communists that the ar-

my is accusing of having partici-
pated in the coup attempt.
Red China Charges Violence
Also, Communist China charg-
ed yesterday that Indonesian
troops shot their way into the
Chinese embassy in Jakarta Sat-
urday, looted part- of the build-
ing and beat a Chinese diplomat.
This was the first Peking report
of protests in Indonesia against
alleged Communist Chinese sup-
port for the Oct. 1 attempt to
overthrow President Sukarno.
The Chinese account said about
40 Indonesian soldiers invaded the
embassy about 6 p.m. and pound-
ed on the door to the office of at-
tache Li Chingtang with rifle
butts, demanding that he open up
for a search. The armed unit forc-
ed Chinese diplomatic officials to
submit to being searched and in-
terrogated. The Chinese report
said the officer in command of the
soldiers "openly declared that
they were sent by the headquar-
ters of the Jakarta military dis-
trict and acted on government or-
ders."
Issues Warning
Dispatches from Jakarta dur-
ing the weekend said the new In-

donesian military command had
issued a warning against any more
anti-Communist rioting and de-
struction of Chinese property. A
mob attacked and burned a Chi-
nese-run university in Jakarta
Thursday.
The Chinese blast placed heavy
pressure on Sukarno to persuade
his military leaders to call off
their crackdown on Communist
elements blamed for the power
grab. Sukarno in speeches yester-
day warned against disunity and
renewed his attack against im-
perialism. He made no mention of
the attempted coup and the tone
of his speeches indicated he still
did not support the army's ac-
tions against the Communists.
Some Indonesian newspapers
have named D. N. Aidit, leader of
the Indonesian Communist party,
as the mastermind of the coup at-
tempt. Aidit is said to have con-
tacts in Peking. Peking's New
China News Agency said 31 per-
sons were arrested in Palembang,
southern Sumatra, and offices of
the Indonesian Communist party
were attacked by an angry crowd
in Banda Atieh, northern Suma-
tra.

By The Associated Press
SALISBURY, Rhodesia-Prime
Minister Ian Smith rejected yes-
terday a proposal that a British
Commonwealth mission try to
settle the intensifying conflict
over white Rhodesian moves for
independence.
Britain's Prime Minister Harold
Wilson then urgently appealed in
a message to Smith's white minor-
ity government to avoid taking
"any irrevocable step." The An-
glican primate of Britain, the
Archbishop of Canterbury, sent a
separate appeal to Smith "in tht
name of our common Christian
faith."
Smith, at a news conference,
said Wilson's proposed Common-
wealth mission was impractical,
but added that the Cabinet had
hot reached a decision on a uni-
lateral declaration of indepen-

peared today to be stepping up
their campaign to seize effective
control of South Viet Nam's rice
bowl - the sweltering Mekong
River delta.
* * *
MILAN, Italy-Milan's Linate
Airport is closed for two weeks for
the installation of antifog equip-
ment that is supposed to convert
fog into snow. All flights are be-
ing diverted to the city's other
airport, Malpensa.

I

1A

We cordially invite the Michigan students
to attend ad tea at our home on South University,

dence.
* * *
MILWAUKEE, Wis-An eccle-
siastical controversy bubbled with-
in a civil rights crisis yesterday as
Roman Catholic priests and nuns
publicly supported a boycott to
protest alleged recial imbalance in
Milwaukee's public schools.
* * *
SAIGON-Viet Cong guerrillas,
operating in battalion strength
and attacking with mortars, ap-

Oct. 20, from 4:00-6:00

P.M.

International students areparticularly
encouraged to attend.

President and Mrs. Hatcher

III

PRESIDENT REACTS TO PROTESTS:
Officials Say Marches Adverse to U.S.--
Prestige Is Dimished by Such Actions

WASHINGTON (P) - President
Johnson, federal officials and a
dozen senators voiced concern yes-
terday that antiwar and antidraft
demonstrations across the country
may undermine peace efforts in
Southeast Asia.
At the Capitol, Sen. Thomas H.
Burns Draft
Card; Youth,
To Be Tried
MANCHESTER, N.H. (P)-David
J. Miller, 22, a college graduate
who says the draft is immoral,
was arrested yesterday as the- first
person charged under the new fed-
eral law banning draft card de-
struction.
Six FBI agents arrested Miller,
of Syracuse, N.Y., when he stopped.
at a service station for repair of
a flat tire that had stalled a
"peace crusade" he and five other
members of a Catholic worker or-
ganization planned in New Eng-
land.
Miller, a ban-the-bomb pin on
the laped of his coat, said he
didn't want counsel. He will rep-
resent himself at a preliminary
removal hearing Friday before
Bouruqe.
Miller was arrested on a war-
rant issued by U.S. Commissioner
Earl Bishop in New York City.
The FBI identified Miller as a
man who burned what he said was
his draft card Friday before hun-
dreds of spectators and demon-
strators near the armed forces in-
duction station on Whitehall
Street in New York City.
- -

Kuchel, assistant Republican lead-
er from California, declared that
protesters who burn draft cards
and fake illnesses to escape mili-
tary service are "sowing the seeds
of treason."
President Johnson, recuperating
at Bethesda Naval Hospital, ex-
pressed concern that weekend
demonstrations in a score of
American cities might cause Pe-
king and Hanoi to miscalculate
American unity and determina-
tion.
Ball Fears Misinterpretation
And Undersecretary of State
George W. Ball said Communists
might misinterpret the American
public's support of U.S. policies
in Viet Nam and this might lead
"to a prolongation of the war."
White House press secretary Bill
D. Moyers told newsmen at Beth-
esda hospital the President en-
dorsed a Justice Department in-
vestigation of whether Commun-
ists are involved in the parades
and picketing.
The President was described as
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"concerned that the actions of a
few would be interpreted as the
opinion of the many by our ad-
versaries abroad."
Undermining President
In the Senate, Mike Mansfield
(D-Mont) said he was shocked
to see pictures of protesters put-
ting a cigarette lighter to their
draft cards.
"These people are undermining

what the President is trying to
do, to bring about a negotiated
settlement in Viet Nam," Mans-
field asserted. "They are furnish-
ing fodder to Hanoi and Peking.
They are showing a sense of utter
irresponsibility."
Kuchel said a California group
has passed out a "dirty, contempt-
ible little sheet" with instructions
on how to evade the draft.

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