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October 13, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-13

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WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 13, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY. OCTOBER 13, 1965 TilE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

Fo.,:ori,,
See Limited.
Viet Action
American Planes,
Downed in North;
Navy Saves Fliers
SAIGON ( t)-Two big offensives
involving thousands of U.S. troops
pushed ahead in South Viet Nam
yesterday but made little or no
contact with guerrillas, U.S. mili-
tary spokesmen reported.
In the air war, Viet Cong .;un-
ners shot down two U.S. planes.
Guam-based U.S. B-52's, making
their eighth raid in seven days,
blasted a suspected Viet Cong
staging area 20 miles northeast,
of Saigon.

.ssembly

Ur

ges Delay
Freedom

National Roundup

thodesian

By Tne Associated Press expected in a patient who had oratory 205 feet deep off the
WASHINGTON - Senate Dem- his gall bladder and a kidney stone Southern California coast. The
omratic Leader Mike Mansfield removed five days ago, third of three diver teams who
(D-Mont) yesterday shelved for * * * spent 15 days each living and
this session the bill to revoke the WASHINGTON--House Speak- working there told about it at a
power of the states to ban the er John A. McCormack led wit- news conference yesterday morn-
union shop. nesses yesterday who claimed ing. Each said it was the thrill of
Mansfield told his colleagues Francis X. Morrissey should not a lifetime.
that the unsuccessful attempt be kept off the federal bench be- * * *
Monday to invoke cloture and shut cause he twice flunked bar exam- ST. LOUIS-The director of the
off the debate had made it clear inations and was active in poll- Manned Orbiting Laboratory -
that he cannot get action on the tics. MOL-program said yesterday the
bill at this time. * * * United States must achieve mili-
His action made it likely that LA JOLLA; Calif.-The director tary supremacy in space before the
Congress will be able to wind up of the Navy's Sealab 2 under- Soviet Union gains control.

Vote Shows
Concernor
Race Issues
Attempt To Prevent
Rhodesian Efforts
For Independence
UNITED NATIONS (R) - The
UN General Assembly approved
overwhelmingly yesterday an ur-!
gent call on Britain to do all in its
power to prevent the white mi-
nority government in Rhodesia
from declaring its independence.
By a vote of 107 to 2, with one
abstention, the Assembly adopted
a resolution that reflected grave
concern in the United Nations
that independence would touch
off racial violence in the central
African colony that could involve
much of the African continent.
Only South Africa and Portugal

the 1965 session shortly. Republi-
can Leader Everett M. Dirksen of-
Illinois had said earlier it might
be possible to adjourn by Oct.
23 if members buckle down.
WASHINGTON - The sugar
bill, the final controversial meas-
ure on the House agenda this year,
easily survived its first skirmish
yesterday, amil sniping about lob-
byists, and moved toward pass-
age today.
The House voted 253 to 80 to
take up the measure, rolling over
an argumnt by Rep. Joseph Y.
Resnick (D-NY) that the way the
bill was presented was "a first
class blackjack job."
Resnick rejected what he called
"dark and sinister threats" that
defeat of the bill would create
chaos in foreign and domestic su-
gar markets.
*:

water research project, summariz-
ing its achievements, said yester-
day: "We obtained our key goals.
We proved that men can live in
ocean depths without physical
harm while they carry out work
assigned them."
Sealab 2 is an underwater lab-

Speaking at a space flight meet-
ing here, Air Force Gen. Ber-
nard A. Schriever said: "Our mili-
tary' responsibility in space is to
respond to the threat-both stat-
ed and implied--which is posed by
Soviet space technology and So-
viet political ambitions."

ANNUAL SUKKOT
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday, October 17, 3-5 P.M.
ALL ARE WELCOME
Program Highlights
NAGILA DANCERS
HILLEL CHOIR
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation-1409 Hill St.

Pilots Rescued:
U.S. spokesmen said the down-
ed American aircraft werea Navy U.S. AMBASSADOR ARTHUR GOLDI
Skyhawk, hit by ground fire over ed that a unilateral declaration of inde
North Viet Nam with its pilot res-
cued at sea; and an Air Force A- AE
lE 'Skyralder, knocked down 240, VANISHED SEPT. M0:
miles northeast of Saigon in South
Viet Nam. An Army helicopter -3. Tg

;l

KEY WEST, Fla.-Five boat-
oads of refugees who departed
Cuba after removal of Premier

F;;;;;-; .;;;;;;; --------------- I -

-Associated Press
BERG, addressing the U.N. General Assembly yesterday, warn-
ependence would put Rhodesia on a "catastrophic course."

voted no. France was the ab- Fidel Castro's emmigration re-
stainer. Britain did not participate strictions headed for Florida yes-
in the vote on the resolution, terday as Miami braced for a
which was sponsored by 40 Asian- possible mass influx.
African countries. The Coast Guard reported it
U.S. Ambassador Arthur J.' was escorting the small craft to
Goldberg declared that in voting Key West across the choppy Flor-
for the resolution the United ida Straits after intercepting them
States hoped "that those who north of Cuba. It said 47" personsc
threaten this catastrophic course were aboard three of the boats,
will heed the warning of this but did not know how many

0 r

w rescued the Skyraider pilot.
U.S. and Vietnamese troops, in
perhaps the largest joint opera-
tion of the war, still reported no
contact with the North Vietna-
mese 325 Division as they closed
the pincers on Soui La Tinh Val-
ley, 250 miles north of Saigon.,
Elements of the Hanoi division
had been reported in the area re-
cently and the Americans and
Vietnamese were hoping they
might contact them.
Troops of the 1st Cavalry, Air-
mobile, Division landed by heli-
copter Sunday and fannd out at
the west end of the valley, 25
miles northwest of An Khe. South
Vietnamese pushed toward the
Americans from the other end.
Sporadic Fire
The "Flying Horsemen" report-
ed only sporadic sniper fire after
an exchange of small arms fire
with guerrillas in the area Mon-
day night, spokesmen said. The
Americans said they killed 16 Viet
C6ng and captured 56 others since
the offensive began. There was no
report on U.S. casualties.
In the other big drive, about 30
miles northeast of Saigon, the U.S.
173rd Airborne Brigade reported
it had killed 81 Viet Cong since
the operation began Friday. U.S.
and Australian troops continued
their big sweep of the Commu-'
nists' "Iron Triangle" stronghold
in the thick jungles.
In other ground action, U.S. 1st.
Infantry Division troops killed five
Viet Cong 20 miles northeast of
Saigon and paratroopers of the
U.S. 101st Airborne killed 10 guer-
rillas near the port of Quin
Nhbn, 260 miles north of Sai-
gon, ,.S. spokesm'en said.
Scattered Action
Vietnamese troops claimed 72
Viet Cong killed in scattred,
ground action. A government unit
suffered light casualties 'in an
ambush 40 miles southwest of Sai-
gon.
Reports in Saigon indicate a
trend toward an increase in Viet
Cong terrorism in retaliation for
heavy losses suffered by the Com-
munists in U.S. air assaults.

eport Indonesian i

arty

Homecoming Dinner and Dance
OKTOBERFEST
DELICIOUS GERMAN FOOD *
LIVE DINNER MUSIC
* DANCE BAND
Dinner 5:30 October 16

r
R

KUALA LUMPUR (R) - The Peking's orbit in the last four or*
Indonesian Communist party's five years.
chief, D. N. Aidit, has escaped a President Sukarno, who return-
military dragnet and fled by sub- ed to Jakarta last weekend from
marine to China, a Hong Kong his summer palace at Bogor south
paper said yesterday. ;6f the capital, had an hour's talk
The report of Aidit's flight came |with First Deputy Premier Sub-
out as Radio Jakarta announced andrio, who also is foreign min-
capture of the front man of the ister. Sukarno was quoted as say-
abortive "Sept. 30 Movement," Lt. ing the crisis, instead of weaken-
Col. Untung. Untung was a bat. ing Indonesia, would strengthen
talion - commander in President its unity.
Sukarno's palace guard. A top American authority on In-
Aidit, 43, the leader of a party donesia, former Ambassador How-
claiming three million members, ard P. Jones, said yesterday the
was close to Sukarno. He vanish- Indonesia Communist party hasI
ed from Jakarta when the army suffered a major defeat and is go-
crushed Untung's leftist coup at- ing to face liquidation.
tempt. In an interview, Jones said the
Tuban Route Indonesian army struck haird and
Te ban- omuntfast after the abortive Sept. 30
The anti - Communist .Hong coup and probably headed off fur-
Yong paper Tin Yat Po quotedhcou ledfrombtheaComust
reliable sources as saying Aidit es- ,ther trouble from the Communists.
caped via the fishing port of Too Early
Tuban, on the north Java coast. He said the coup plans had been
A Chinese submarine picked him carefully. laid "but it is possible
up for the voyage to the China that someone pulled the trigger
mainland, Tin Yat Po said. The and fired" before the plot had
Indonesian party, once pro-Mos- been perfected.
cow, has swung gradually into/ Jones, who served as U.S. am-
NEW PRESS RUN
STUDENT DIRECTORIES
available at Bookstores
and
Student Publications Bldg
420 Maynard St.

assembly and draw back before it
it too late."
"I hope that all members of the!
Assemblywill join in expressingC
bassador in Jakarta for seven the unanimous view that the reck-t
years until spring of this year, less and desperate step which ist
said: contemplated must not be taken,"
"I think there has been a strong Goldberg said.
anti-Communist feeling in Indo- It was the first time that the
r.esia among a great many people, United States had voted for a UN
possibly a majority of the people. resolution on the Rhodesian prob-x
"This has been suppressed for a lem, and a U.S. spokesman saidl
long time, but it has been released it demonstrated the strong feel-
by the horrible series of happen ing of President Johnson's ad-
ings with the mutilation and ministration on the situation.
death of six generals. In London, British Prime Min-
"I think it is going to be very ister Harold Wilson asked Rho-
difficult to stop these strong an- desia to receive a mission of Com-
ti-Communist feelings, even if monwealth chiefs of government
somebody wants to stop it," Jones to avert the peril of race war. He
said. said in a televised speech carried
"As far as I can see, President to all parts of the 21-nation Com-f
Sukarno is the principal one who monwealth, including Rhodesia,
wants to stop it, because of his that any illegal seizure of Inde-
own strong feeling that the unity pendence "could start a chain re-
of the country is the most impor- action in Africa of which no one
tant thing to preserve." could see the end."

were on the others.
WASHINGTON-President Lyn-
don B. Johnson, following doc-
tors' orders "to a T," venturedI
outside his hospital room yester-
day for the first time since his
operation and strolled unaided'
down the corridor.
Johnson was troubled by gas
pains, but the hospital White
House said that was normal and
I, - ________________________________3

Dance 7:30

$2.00 per per

N EWMAN STUDENT CENTER
331 Thompson

rson

iJ 1" . ..

-----

I

I

AIRPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
663-8300
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
Ph. 483-4680
Entrane On CARPENTER ROAD
NOW SHOWING.
JAMES
STEWART
HENANDOAH

WANTED!
FIFTY
MEN
Because you like our pizza so
much, we need HELP! For a
great opportunity to
EARN EXTRA MONEY

I

K'
p
& Olle
\ t
Y
THE HEATHER LOOK TAKI
TO PASTEL. Here are basics
the Brush Hill Holiday Heath
Collection. Long sleeve allw
cardigan, riEn front. The sAk
is all wool flannel, a fully-line
no-waistband hip hugger. Colc
are Heather Willow, Heath

TOMORROW
ON-CAMPUS SALE DAY
9:00-5:00
ON DIAG AND AT CORNER OF NORTH U. & STATE STREETS
See student representatives for sales coupons
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
P'LAYBILL 1965'/66
HENRY VI, Parts I, II, III
by William Shakespeare
In repertory November 17 through December 5
Trueblood Auditorium
THE DAYS BETWEEN
by Robert Anderson
Prior to Broadway by arrangement with the American Playwrights Theatre
February 2-5
Trueblood Auditorium

.ge-
mown
of
Boston

PREMIERE
PRODUCTION
in cooperation with the
Department of English
February 16-19,
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

ROSALINDA
The Max Reinhardt version of
Die Fledermaus by Johann Strauss
in cooperation with the
Opera Department
March 16-19
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

I

I

PEER GYNT
by Henrik Ibsen
The American version by Paul Green
April 6-9
Trueblood Auditorium
ALL PERFORMANCES 8:00 P.M.
SEASON TICKETS: $6.75, $4.50
plus 25c for each ticket for each Friday or Saturday performance

take advantage

of

our Full

and Part - time employment

openings.

Apply in person at

ES
in
her
ool
ki rt
ed,
ors
er

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301 W. Cross Street or Call

lf'ikA ^ D Df (1W

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