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October 10, 1965 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-10

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 10, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'PALM i! 10,54211 V

rAULTHIM

5

Algeria's

Political

Juggling

Irritates

Communists

By MICHAEL GOLDSMITH
ALGIERS (P)-The Algerian re-
gime of Col. Couari Boumedienne
has taken a sharp anti-Commun-
ist turn at home while trying hard
to build up friendly relations with
the Soviet bloc and the West.
This political juggling act has
brought the wrath of Soviet edi-
torial writers and the French
Communist party down on the
colonel's head and is seriously,
threatening the African-Asian
summit conference scheduled to
open here Nov. 5.
Some 30 French Communists
and an unknown number of Al-
gerian leftists are in jail, ac-
cused of plotting against the
Boumedienne regime.
The Soviet Communist party
Smith

newspaper Pravda thundered
against the recent arrests and
the Paris Communist paper L'-
Humanite denounced Boumedien-
ne as a fascist dictator.
Algerian officials tend to shrug
off these attacks as meaningless
propaganda and point out that
Moscow has shown no signs of
slowing down its military or eco-
nomic aid to Algeria..
L'Humanite is banned in Al-
geria; the Algiers Communist
paper Alger Republican has been
suppressed and most of its edi-
tors are in jail. Yet officials pro-
test that the regime is not against
communism-only against "Com-
munist interference in our domes-
tic affairs."
In the West there is a new

confidence in Algeria that is be-
ginning to pay dividends.
For the first time since French
rule ended in 1962, private in-
terests-mostly French-are tim-
idly investing in Algerian industry.
Planes from France are filled
with European businessmen and
technicians displaying a new faith
in Algeria's future.
Shops are filled with sophisti-
cated consumer goods and West-
ern diplomats are talking of a
possible substantial increase in
economic aid.
However, in the nearly four
months since Ahmed Ben Bella
was ousted from the presidency,
little has been done to end the
mismanagement that provided a
main pretext for Ben Bella's re-

moval.
A few private businesses seized
under the Ben Bella regime have
been returned to their French or
Algerian owners with the official
explanation that seizure was an
administrative error.
But the bulk of Algerian in-
dustry and virtually all agricul-
ture remain under often chaotic
state control. Employes of state
enterprises and workers on the
self-managed farms may go for
months without being paid. Labor
unrest is increasing while the re-
gime tries to purge the labor
unions of leaders suspected of
Ben Bella sympathies.
One official said strikes or-
ganized to embarrass the govern-
ment will not be tolerated. When

asked why some workers had .not
been paid, he replied: "That is
the price we are paying for Ben
Bella's misrule."
Many ministries have barely
resumed functioning since the pre-
dawn military coup of June 19
brought Boumedienne to power.
The new ministers, many of them
keen and able men, have had no
time to reorganize their depart-
ments or clean up the chaos they
say was left by Ben Bella.
For more than three months,
most ministers have been travel-
ing about trying to drum up sup-
port for the summit conference
originally scheduled to open June
29.
It was to be the first African-
Asian summit since the historic

1955 meeting at Bandung, Indo-
nesia.
In the confusion, rioting and
sabotage that followed the June
coup in Algiers, the leading Afri-
can-Asian governments decided
conditions were too unstable to
go ahead with the meeting then.
The beautiful new conference
hall is at last completed and
ready, but Algerian officials are
becoming doubtful that the meet-
ing will really take place.
At first, Boumedienne staked
all his and Algeria's prestige on
the gathering, which was to es-
tablish the nation as a top leader
of the African-Asian world.
The growing divisions within
the group gradually cooled the
enthusiasm and raised fears that

failure of the meeting-far from
enhancing Algeria's prestige-
could do it crippling damage.
Red China's Foreign Minister
Marshal Chen Yi made a remark
at a Sept. 29 Peking news con-
ference that hit Algerian officials
like an icy blast.
The Chinese-prime movers be-
hind the conference-will de-
nounce and condemn American
imperialism, Chen Yi was report-
ed as saying.
This was not at all Boumedi-
enne's idea of the conference.
The government press and radio
continue to sympathize with the
Viet Cong rebels in South Viet
Nam but no longer is this posture
allowed to cloud Algeria's desire
for friendly relations with the
United States.
Nor does Boumedienne's regime
-like many other African-Asian

governments receiving substantial
American aid-feel inclined to bite
the hand that feeds it.
Algeria also fears that the con-
ference may turn into a noisy
Chinese-Soviet slugging match,
whether or not the Chinese can
prevent seating of the Soviet Un-
ion.
The India-Pakistan war, the re-
volt in Indonesia, the Indonesian-
Malaysian quarrel, Pakistan's
break with Malaysia, and the con-
tinuing squabbles between Ghana
and its French-speaking African
neighbors have cast doubt on the
advisability of an African-Asian
solidarity conference now.
Officially, Algeria is determined
to go ahead with it. Privately,
officials are having s e c o n d
thoughts and would be relieved
if the whole summit could be
swept under the rug.

_ , ____

Expects

Rhodesia

To Declare Independence

MONDAY, OCT. 11
Teology & he Literary Imagination"
7:30 P.M.-Multipurpose Room, UGLI

LONDON (AP) - Prime Minister
Ian Smith of Rhodesia said yes-
terday he believes his nation soon
will declare itself independent
from Britain-now that negotia-
tions in London have collapsed.
"If we have to get out of our
country," he told a news confer-
ence, "then we would rather go
out fighting than crawling on our
knees."
A white minority governs Rho-
desia. The British maintain that
a declaration of independence by
the Rhodesian government would
amount to treason against the
crown. And further the British be-

lieve such a step could plunge a
wide section of Africa into con-
fusion and strife.
Smith gave a lengthy review of
the position of the Rhodesian gov-
ernment. He first read a state-
ment maintaining that he had
tried to compromise with Britain
on terms for independence, but
Britain had refused to budge.
Then reporters asked him about
independence.
"I just don't think it will take
us very long to reach a decision on
this," Smith replied. "As you
know we have given this a tre-
mendous amount of study. I think

we have made up our minds al-
ready. I will be going back home
for a final decision on this, and I
do not believe it will take long.
"As for any alternative, quite
frankly if we are to preserve our
Christian Western civilization in
Rhodesia, there is no alternative
to independence. If we cannot ob-
tain independence by negotiation,
then I do not know of any other
alternative."
Talks between Smith and Prime
Minister Harold Wilson collapsed
Friday, with Smith insisting that
Rhodesia b e c o m e independent
without further delay.

INDONESIAN ARMY ON THE PROWL:
Radio Malaysia Re ports
Anti-Red Push Spreading

Wilson demanded that inde-
pendence be held off until the
white minority takes steps to en-
sure eventual rule by the colony's
3.9-million black African majority.
Smith, leader of the 250,000
white Rhodesians, seemed ready
to defy Britain and declare inde-
pendence unilaterally. But some
observers said he might avoid any
immediate declaration of inde-
pendence until he returns to Rho-
desia and consults his Cabinet.
If Rhodesia breaks away, its
Africans are expected to recat vio-
lently, feeling they have lost their
last hope of ever attaining ma-
jority rule. Observers also fear a
violent reaction against whites
elsewhere in Africa.
At the United Nations in New
York, the United States warned
"concrete action" to oppose a
Rhodesian breakaway. The United
States has said it would not rec-
ognize a whitepgovernment that
took such a step.
There has been talk in the
United Nations of organizing a
Congo - type international f o r c e
aimed at installing a new regime
in Rhodesia.
British sources said the govern-
ment has made it clear to Smith
it would not oppose U.N. action
connected with Rhodesia.
Wilson warned Smith that Bri-
tain and other Commonwealth na-
tions plan diplomatic and eco-
nomic sanctions to isolate Rho-
desia if it breaks away. Observers
said Britain also probably would
fly troops to neighboring Zambia
-formerly Northern Rhodesia-to
guard against violence in that na-
tion, now ruled by Africans.
In Salisbury, capital of Rhode-
sia, whites expressed dismay but
showed little surprise when they
learned of the breakdown of talks
in London. "Well, that's that,"'
said a white railway worker.
"We're on our own."
The immediate reaction of the
Negro majority was not known,
but it's an open secret that most
informed Africans expect trouble.

WILLIAM F. LYNCH, S.J.

BACK TO WORK

Looking remarkably fit for a man who recently underwent major
abdominal surgery, President Johnson poses for photographers
at the U.S. Naval Hospital in suburban Bethesda, Md. Johnson
spent a typically active day yesterday, signing 13 bills into law
and taking several short strolls around the hospital.

KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (T)
-Radio Malayisa said yesterday
the Indonesian army's anti-Com-
munist campaign is spreading
from Java, showing up in both the
Celebes to the east and Sumatra
to the west.
Prime Minister Abdul Rahman
of Malaysia, harassed economical-
ly and militarily for months by its
big island neighbor, suggested in
a speech that Indonesian Presi-
dent Sukarno will lose a golden
opportunity if he fails to oust the
Communists now.
"As if in answer to our prayers,
the Indonesian people have now
realized that the real enemy of
Indonesia is not western imper-
ialists or Malaysia, but rather the
Communist imperialists w h o s e
plan is to dominate Southeast
Asia."
T h e Malaysian government
radio account said Moslems and
the National party in the Celebes,
following the lead of Jakarta dem-
onstrators, demanded that the In-
donesian Communist party-PKI
-and its affiliates be banned as
an aftermath of the uprising.
The broadcast also told of side-
lights from the abortive leftist
coup last weekend:
0 Geni. Abdul Hanis Nasution,
the defense minister and armed
forces chief, has taken direct
charge for the time being of In-
donesia's official news agency An-
tara. The army suspended the
agency's operations a week ago on
the ground it was infiltrated by
Communists.
* Government forces uncover-
ed a rebel cache of 234 rifles near
the Halim air base on Jakarta's
outskirts, where a common grave
previously yielded the mutilated
bodies of six army generals. l
*A seventh general, Brig. Gen.
Samusi of the national police, was
another victim of the rebellion.
Reporting on a previously undis-
closed incident, the radio said he
was killed saving the life of Dep-
uty Premier Johannes Leimena
Oct. 1.
The PKI, whose Jakarta head-
quarters were burned by a youth-
ful mob Friday, has denied it was

involved and called the plot "an
internal affair of the army."
Sukarno has given no sign that
he intends to turn against his Red
friends, whose support he has wel-
comed and encouraged in the past.
He has urged that there be no
revenge.
Two demonstrations were re-
ported in Sumatra, rich in oil and
rubber, which is second in size
only to Borneo among Indonesia's
islands. The Malaysian station
said workers seized a Communist-
control union headquarters.
Sukarno expressed disapproval
of the anti-Communist campaign
at a cabinet meeting last Wednes-
day at his summer palace at Bo-
gor, 40 miles south of Jakarta.
Armed Forces Chief Abdul Haris
Nasution boycotted the meeting.
The Tokyo newspapers Asahi

Shimbun published a report by a
Japanese correspondent who said
he was "shocked" by the number
of weapons owned by Communists
In Java.
He said local Reds virtually con-
firmed reports that Communist
Chinese ships were secretly un-
loading small arms at fishing re-
ports for distribution to PKI
members.
Communist North Viet Nam ac-
cused the United States of "seek-
ing to whip up an anti-Communist
campaign in Indonesia."
Radio Hanoi quoted North Viet-
namese newspaper reports that in
recent months "the reactionary
forces in Indonesia, encouraged by
the U.S. imperialists, plotted a
coup d'etat to oppose President
Sukarno and Indonesia's republi-
can regime."

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are avail-
able in Room 1011 SAB.
Guild House, Monday noon luncheon;
Prof. Inis Claude, Dept. of Political
Science, "Is the UN Peace Machinery
Breaking Down?", Oct. 11, 12-1 p.m.;
Tues., Oct. 12, 7-8:30 p.m., seminar on
"Existentialism," Guild House, 802 Mon-
roe.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia, lunes
el 18 de octubre, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze
Safe y concersacion. vengan todos.
* *~ *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship
services at 9:30 and it a.m., Program
with David Peterling, Grad student-
"God the Creator-or Is DNA the Se-
cret of life?" at 7 p.m., Sun., Oct. 10,
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Newman Student Association, Inter-
national dinner, Oct. 10, 6:30 p.m., 331
Thompson.
University Lutheran Chapel, Sun-
day morning services at 9:45 and 11:15
a.m., Oct. 10, Pastor Alfred T. Scheips,
speaker. All welcome, 1511 Washtenaw.
South Quad Quadrants, Homecom -
ing meeting, Oct. 10, South Quad
Council Room..

CAREER PLANNING
VOCATIONAL
APTITUDE TESTING
COUNSELING
ANN ARBOR COUNSELING
AND GUIDANCE
321 SOUTH MAIN ST,
Suite 213, Whitker Building
Ann Arbor, Michigan 48108
665-3635 665-7902
By Appointment

-author of Christ and Apollo; The Integrating
Mind; The Image Industries: An Introduction
to the Metaphysics of Plato through the
,Parmenides; Images of Hope.
-drama director: "Oedipus Rex," "The Ecumenides,"
"The Clouds," "The Aulularia,/ Chaucer's "The
Pardoner's Tale," and "Everyman."
-former reporter for New York Herald Tribune;
editor of Thought (national quarterly);
doctoral studies in classics, Fordham University;
fellowship at Princeton; Co-director of
Georgetown University Honors Program.
-presently Visiting Professor of Religion at Carleton
College, Minn. and faculty member, St. Peter's
College, New Jersey.
This University Lecture is the 3rd in the fal
lecture series sponsored by The Office of Religious
Affairs, The University of Michigan.
ALL STUDENTS, FACULTY & STAFF WELCOME

READ

Ii

THE DAILY

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (/P)-In-
tegrationist Bayard Rustin will
speakaat the University of Mary-
land as scheduled next week, but
only to members of the Law En-
forcement Institute.
The public and the press have
been barred from the two-day
meeting because, said a university
official Friday, "it was felt it
would detract from the purpose
of the program." ,
Rustin, a leader in'the intergra-
tionist movement and a director
of the 1963 march on Washington,
was invited to speak at the law
enforcement seminar because of
his firsthand knowledge in dealing
with demonstrations.
* * *
NEW YORK--New York City's
idled newspapers began returning
to print yesterday following tenta-
tive settlement of a 24-day strike-
shutdown.
The Times, focal point of the
labor dispute, remained off the
newsstands, however. Its return
awaited rank-and-file acceptance

of the contract approved by ne-
gotiators for the AFL-CIO New
York Newspaper Guild.
The Guild's 2,200 members in
the Times' editorial, advertising,
business and building services de-
partments struck Sept. 16.
In addition to the Times, News,
Long Island Press and Journal-
American, the dispute idled the
World-Telegram and Sun and the
Long Island Star-Journal.
. . .*
VIET NAM-Viet Cong guerril-
las ambushed a 20-truck trans-
port company of the U.S. 1st In-
frantry Division about 40 miles
north of Saigon Friday night. A
military spokesman said the
Americans sufferedamoderate cas-
ualties before fighting their way
out of the trap.
As if in response, eight U.S. Air
Force jets pounced before dawn
on a North Vetnamese convoy of
more than 30 trucks on a coastal
highway 160 miles north of the
border. The spokesman said they
destroyed 11 trucks and dam-
aged 21.

Read
Daily
C lassifieds

T
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a
s
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_1

PROF. RICHARD L. MEIER
Of the Mental Health Research Institute
will talk at the Daily
at 8 P.M., TUESDAY, Oct. 12
Those interested in joining the
Daily staff are invited

IL

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THE AMERICAN CITY:
GOD'S OWN JUNKYARD OR
COMMUNITY FOR LIVING?
Presents
WOLF VON ECKARDT
of the Washington Post
Outspoken critic of current trends
in urban architecture and
suburban non-planning

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