100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 05, 1965 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

ii i ow

Thousands

Greet

Pontiff

NORTH OF SAIGON:
Fierce Fighting Breaks Out
In Communist Held Provinces

On Historic Goodwill

m

Appeals for
Peace, New
STrust in UN
Urges Disarmament
As Immediate Goal
Of World Leaders
UNITED NATIONS W) -Pope
Paul VI implored the United Na-
tions yesterday to make disarm-
ament its immediate goal with
special emphasis on banning of-
fensive weapons.
In an historic, impassioned
speech for world peace to the UN
General Assembly he urgedheach
delegate to adopt this as his sol-
emn oath: "No more war, war
never again."
And he added: "It is peace
which must guide the destinies
and peoples of all mankind."
Albania Boycott
Only Communist Albania, re-
garded as the voice of Commu-
nist China in the United Nations,
boycotted the Pope's appearance.
All other 116 delegations were
present.
The Pope was escorted into the
3 vast assembly hall by, UN Secre-
tary-General U Thant, the Bur-
mese Buddhist who invited the
Pope to make his unprecedented
UN appearance, and by Amintore
Fanfani of Italy, assembly presi-
dent.
To an audience that included
an array of world political leaders
he pleaded for increased trust
in the authority and ultimate
goals of the United Nations. The
top U.S. official present was Sec-
retary of State Dean Rusk and
the leading Soviet was Foreign
Minister Andrei A. Gromyko.
Feed the Hungry
The pontiff asked for intensifi-
cation of UN efforts to feed the
hungry in the world, but he spoke
out against any UN declaration
that would favor birth control.
He referred also to the absence
of nations from the world organi-
zation in terms that indicated he
envisioned the eventual admis-
sion of Communist China and the
divided nations, such as Germany.
Urges Disarmament
The Pope put main emphasis
on disarmament as a primary
means of obtaining world peace.
To the delegates who have been
striving unsuccessfully for 20 years
to achieve world disarmament he
said:
"If you wish to be brothers, let
the arms fall from your hands.
One cannot love while holding of-
fensive arms."
Respect for Life
The pontiff referred to birth
ontrol when he spoke of th-
UN's efforts to promote the "fun-
damental rights and duty of man,
his dignity, his freedom and above
all his religious freedom.
"Respect for life, even with re-
gard to the great problem of the
birth rate, must find here in your
assembly its highest affirmation
and its most reasonabb defense.
Your task is to ensure that there
is enough bread on the tables of
mankind, and not to encourage
an artificial birth control, which
would be irrational, in order to
diminish the number of guests at
the banquetof life."
He urged therUnited Nations to
adhere to a formula of equality,
"never one above the other."
"You are not equal, but here
you make yourselves equal," he
added.
Pope Paul closed on a spiritual
note with a reminder that the
world organization "does not rest
upon merely material and earth-
ly foundations, for if so it would
be a house built upon sand; above
all, it is based on our consciences."

SAIGON ()-New fierce fight-
o~ur img between government and Viet i
Cong forces exploded yesterday in
a Communist-dominated province
275 miles northeast of Saigon and+
a United States military spokes-
man described South Vietnamese
PresluenL losses as heavy.
He said the combat raged in
0t Binh Dinh Province, scene of two
M eets WL bloody fights between -Commu-
nists and the Vietnamese in the
last two weeks.
As the fighting erupted, South
Pop Pl Viet Nam protested to the inter-;
national control commission that:
North Vietnamese regular army
Parades, Mass at troops were used in the province
Stadium Highlight last week.
Elsewhere, a major clash ap-
Event-Filled Day peared to be developing in the
province of An Xuygen, 130 miles
NEW YORK OP)-Pope Paul VI southwest of Saigon. A U.S. Ma-
dramatically pleaded for peace rmne spokesman reported a Leath-
and disarmament yesterday as he erneck patrol, ambushed Sunday
moved rapidly about this melting near Da Nang, had 10 of its 13
pot of the New World on a mo- members killed or wounded.
mentous and heartfelt mission: In the air war, U.S. planes
the uniting of all mankind in a ! plastered targets in North and

There was no estimate of ene-
my losses in the new fighting in
Binh Dinh Province. Casualties
among U.S. advisers with the gov-
ernment troops were described as
light.
Guerrillas Massing
The U.S. government said a
Vietnamese battalion protecting
engineers working on a bridge
destroyed in heavy fighting last
week near Phu Cu Pass came un-
der Viet Cong attack.
The province, a Viet Cong
stronghold, is where U.S. advisers
reported 3000 guerrillas massing
last week.
In its protest to the control
commission, South Viet Nam said
it had captured troops from three
regiments of the North Vietna-
mese 325th Division in the Phu
Cu fighting and protested their
presence as a violation of the 1954
Geneva agreement.
Viet Cong Ambush
U.S. military authorities have
confirmed the presence of at least
one regiment of the division in
the central highlands since early
this year.
The 13 Marines were ambush-

-Associated Press

POPE PAUL VI AND PRESIDENT Lyndon Johnson met in New York's Waldorf Astoria Hotel yes-
terday during the Pope's historic visit to the United States in his quest for world peace. The Pope
addressed the United Nations and pleaded for disarmament.
ARMY AROUSED:
Rebels Slaughter Generals
As Fighting ersists in Java

KUALA LUMPER OP)-Indonesia
faced the threat of civil war yes-
terday as the progovernment army
denounced the air force, whose
members backed a leftist rebel
coup attempt last Thursday.
Clashes between the army and
rebel forces were reported in cen-
tral Java.
President Sukarno, in a message
broadcast over Jakarta Radio,
called on all the Indonesian arm-
ed forces to end hostilities arising
from the attempt to unseat him.
He said the coup attempt was a
political matter, and he would
solve it as soon as possible. But
the army was angry at the air
force.
Maj. Gen. Suharto, in control
of the army under Sukarno's or-
ders, accused the air force of
"merciless action" in killing the
army chief of staff-Lt. Gen. Ach-

mad Yani, an anti-Communist-
and five other generals.
Generals Killed
A Jakarta broadcast said the
mutilated bodies of the six army
generals were found in a common
grave near an air force base just
outside the' capital.
Suharto denounced the air force
chief, Vice Admiral Omar Dhani,
who has pro-Communist sympa-
thies, and Lt. Col. Untung, the
presidential guard officer who led
the coup attempt, in the slaying
of the generals.
In his broadcast, Suharto point-
edly noted that Sukarno, in a
radio message earlier yesterday,
had absolved the air force of any
involvement in the coup attempt.
Air Force Coup
A later Jakarta broadcast car-
ried a message said to have been
signed by Dhani in which he ad-

mitted that certain members of
the air force had taken part in
the coup attempt but promised
that "action will be taken against
these people." Dhani by his ac-
count was in Jakarta.
The Malaysia government radio
said the big central Java city of
Jogjakarta had been retaken by
army troops after it was captured
by Communist elements.
British sources in Jakarta said
Untung's forces are believed to be
retreating, indicating that the
rebel forces have been badly split.
The loyalist Siliwangi division
reportedly was offered to central
Java to attack the Diporegoro
division.
A Jakarta Radio broadcast
quoted the Siliwangi commander,
Maj. Gen. Ibrahim Adjie, as say-
ing: We have a duty to restore
peace and we will do it."

future without war.
History was written with vir-
tually his every word and action1
on this, the first visit to the
United States by Roman Cath-
olic pontiff.
Eventfilled Day
The spiritual leader of 550 mil-
lion Roman Catholics arrived at
Kennedy Airport at 9:27 a.m. yes-
terday on his peace mission to the
United Nations and a meeting
with President Johnson. After the
welcoming ceremonies at the air-
port, the Pope left for the 24-mile
parade to Manhattan and St. Pat-
rick's Cathedral, the first of his
event-filled day.
Crowds four and five persons
deep flanked the Pope's path
through Queens. Police estimated
630,000 saw the Pope in Queens.
All through the almost entirely
Negro neighborhood, crowds of
four and five deep cheered and
waved as the cars passed.
Packed Church
The pontiff greetedthe thick-
est throng of the triumphal pa-
rade upon reaching St. Patrick's
Cathedral.
Making the sign of the Cross,
he walked into the cathedral to
offer a prayer of thanksgiving for
his safe arrival, then extended
his greeting to the packed con-
gregation.
Although almost unheard of
within the cathedral's walls, there
was prolonged applause. Then,
having donned a scarlet garment,
Pope Paul went through a side
door to bless the onlookers out-
side, walking slowly, his arms up-
raised in blessing.
Standing Ovation
More than 4000 persons, crowd-
ed into the 2500-seat center of
the Catholic church in New York,
stood to applaud and cheer when
the Pope came in.
After Cardinal Spellman for-
mally greeted the pontiff, Pope
Paul responded briefly and gave
his blessing to those present.
The Pope then left the Cathe-
dral to go for the first meeting
of a Pope and a U.S. President
on American soil at the Waldorf
Astoria.
Presidential Meeting
The 50-minute history making
private conference was climaxed
by President Johnson and Pope
Paul proclaiming publicly than
they are united in seeking paths
to peace.
Johnson said the Pope's jour-
ney to New York "may be just
what the world needs to get us
thinking of how to achieve peace
and getting us to make progress
in that area."
Work for Peace
The pontiff said through an
interpreter that he was very hap-
py that the session with John-
son "revolved about a mutual de-
sire to work for peace."
Besides talking of possible
routes to peace, Johnson reported
that he and Pope Paul discussed
global trouble spots-India and
Pakistan, the Dominican Repub-
lic, Viet Nam and others - and
efforts to combat illiteracy and
disease throughout the world.
After leaving the meeting with
Johnson, Pope Paul went to Car-
dinal Spellman's residence to rest
until the UN appearance.
At the UN the Pope addressed
the representatives of 116 coun-
tries and later went to a pri-
vate reception yhere he was in-
troduced to the delegates.
Leaving the UN, Pope Paul met
in brotherly comradeship with
Protestant, Orthodox and Jewish
leaders concerned with interna-
tional affairs, and pledged coop-
eration with them in the cause
of peace.
The Pope and representatives
of the other religious bodies voic-
ed confidence that their joint ef-
forts heralded a brighter future

. and a greater hope for concord

THNE
WILD DUCK
by
HENRIK IBSEN
A new version
of the poignant drama
Directed by
Stephen Porter
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts
Oct. 6,7,8

YOU CAN'T
TAKE IT
WITH YOU
by
GEORGE S. KAUFMAN
and MOSS HART
The classic
American comedy!
Directed by
Ellis Rabb
Set Designer: James Tilton
Costume Designer: Nancy Potts
Oct. 9,10

lost and the pilot killed.

E

PT.ssI PJm
Ini

South Viet Nam and on the South
China Sea coast. One plane was

ed by an estimated 150 to 200 Viet
Cong south of Da Nang, 380
miles north of Saigon. U.S. rein-
forcements also suffered casual-
ties, a Marine spokesman said.
One survivor said the guerrillas
had placed live ducks over their
heads for camouflage. Another
said the Viet Cong popped up
from bunkers and huts and be-
hind 15-foot high sugar cane
BEST DEALS ON '66
Mustangs-Falcons-Fords
USED CARS-ALL MAKES
SEE OR CALL
JOHN HARRISON
Henderson Ford Sales, 662-3261
YOU
Hae T- * t
To Bu$
CoNTeMPRaRY CARD
O CME$finD iTThus
Chester Roberts
Cards and Candies
302 S. State
1203 $. University

CASTRO EXPLANATION:
Guevara Gives Up Position as
Cuban Minster of Industries

HAVANA WP) - The departure
of Ernesto (Che) Guevara leaves
behind only one of the four men
closest to Prime Minister Fidel
Castro when he set out in 1956
to overthrow dictator Fulgencio
Batista. That one is Raul Cas-
tro, Fidel's brother.
Fidel Castro said Sunday night
that Guevara had finished his
work in Cuba in April and had
moved on to revolutionary activ-
ity elsewhere. He did not say
where.
Castro lost two other leaders
in 1959-one in a plane crash, one
by political defection.
Hubert Mattos, a leader in the

Castro revolution, turned against
the regime because he said the
Communists were taking over. Ar-
rested in the fall of 1959, he was
convicted as a traitor 'in De-
cember and is serving a 20-year
sentence.
One of the men who spoke up
against Mattos was Maj. Camilo
de Cienfuegos, another stalwart of
Castro in fighting Batista's sol-
diers.
The commander of Castro's rev-
olutionary army, Cienfuegos van-
ished in his small plane on a
flight to Havana. The wreckage
was never found.
Guevara probably was closest
to the Castro brothers. He, Raul
and Fidel were among 12 survivors
of a landing on the coast Dec.
2, 1956, who made it into the
hills to fight Batista. Batista's
troops were fighting the rest of
Castro's small band.
Guevara had met Fidel and
Raul in Mexico where they were
planning their revolution against
Batista. Even then, the Argen-
tine-born Guevara, now 37, was
considered an expert on guerrillaj
warfare.

With the overthrow of Batista
Jan. 1, 1959, Guevara turned to
economic planning and in Novem-
ber became head of Cuba's na-
tional bank. In February of 1961
he became minister of industries,
a post he held until his depar-
ture.
At a rally Sunday Castro read a
letter he said Guevara gave him
April 1. Mrs. Guevara was in
the audience dressed in black and
appeared on the verge of tears.
"I have fulfilled the part of
my duty that bound me to the
revolution in your territory," the
letter said.
At any rate, the letter Castro
read made clear that Guevara's
role in Cuba is ended, and that
Communist historians must re-
gard Guevara as a man who con-
fessed he did not understand suf-
ficiently Castro's "qualities as di-
rector and as revolutionary."
Guevara's disappearance has
aroused speculation that he was
pushed out or liquidated because
of his criticism of the Soviet Un-
ion's tactics. Guevara has advo-
cated the Peking ideology and
its policy of belligerency.

"DID'JA KNOW THERE'S A PARADE
FOR HOMECOMING THIS YEAR?"'......
"A parade?"
"YUP"
"Like the Michigras
parade used to be?"
"NOPE. LOTS BIGGER AND BETTER"......
".bigger? "
"YUP ... 60 UNITS:
24 FLOATS
10 BANDS
LOVELY HON IES LIKE
MISS MICHIGAN
MISS NATIONAL COLLEGE QUEEN
MISS CHERRY FESTIVAL QUEEN
MISS OAKLAND UNIVERSITY
PLAYBOY BUNNIES
AND THE GORGEOUS GO GO GIRLS
CELEBRITIES LIKE
JAMES McDIVITT
SONNY ELIOT
PRESIDENT HATCHER
AND LOTS'A OTHER ATTRACTIONS".....
"TWhere is this parade?"H ROUGH
DOWNTOWN AA
AND THE
CAMPUS AREA."
When

Soviets Launch New
Moon Space Station

MOSCOW Q'P)-The Soviet Un-
ion launched an apparently un-
manned space station toward the
moon yesterday and said its
course was "close to the precribed
one."
The Soviets said all systems
aboard the satellite were func-
tioning normally.
No specific mission was an-
nounced for the satellite, Luna 7,
but it was believed to be the
third Soviet attempt this year to
make man's first soft landing on

space station," Tass said, the same
one used on the earlier moon
probes. The term automatic space
station normally means an un-
manned satellite.

World News Roundup j

By The Associated Press
SR7AOTT~lWT"!...T .+-

WASHINGTON - The State
SDnartment said vesterdav it has

gia's Ku Klux Klan grand dragon
was arrested yesterday and charg-

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan