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October 03, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-03

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SUNDAY, OC-iOBER 3, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

SUNDAY, OCTOBER 3,1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVET~

Late

Touchdown

Snaps

Gl /
l l

Victory

Skein

Michigan Falls Victim
Jo Spirited Bulldogs

Attack Fails in Second Half

ByCHUCK VETZNER
A lovely coed in a red cheer-
leading outfit ran up to Preston
Ridlehuber, threw her arms around
him, and happily gushed, "I'm so
proud of y'all."
Ridlehuber readjusted the 'grip
on his apple, embaced his admirer
and tenderly kissed her on the
bheek without a trace of em-
barrassment.
You only blush out of pride
after beating Michigan.
"They were a great team," said
Ridlehuber in reference to the
Wolverines.'
But the Georgia Bulldogs are
getting accustomed to beating
most worthy opponents. Only two
weeks ago, they upset Alabama,
18-17.
"Alabama is like fleas," drawled
Ridlehuber. "They don't hit hard,
but they're fast and there is al-
ways a swarm of them around
you." "Michigan has more talent-
ed individuals than Alabama,"
chipped in Georgia coach Vince
Dooley. "It certainly helps being
the underdog for these kind of
games."
Exuberant Southerners
The Georgia fans were far more
expresive and effusive in praising
their heroes. One fellow with a
bright crimson tie and a, nose ,in
the same shade roared, "This is
the best team Georgia ever pro-
duced. This is the best team the
South ever produced. This is the
best team in the world."
The Bulldog partisans made
their presence known with a wave
of confederate flags and constant
flow of noise. After the game,
one middle-aged Georgia peach
bellowed "You Michigan people
can have your damn niggers." He
then proceeded to smash one
Michigan student in the jaw to
get the point across.
"We came in cars, buses, and
trains," said another fan. "There
were only a thousand of us, but
we had the voices of three thou-
sand."
Wolverines Downcast
Over in the Michigan locker-
room a single voice would have
been audible. Only the splattering
of the showers prevented com-
plete silence.
YESTERDAY'S
RESULTS
GRID PICKS
Georgia 15, Michigan 7
MU14, Purdue 14
Notre Dame 38, Northwestern 7
MSU 22, Illinois 12
Wisconsin 16, Iowa 13
Missouri 17, Minnesota 6
Ohio State 23, Washington 21
Texas 27, Indiana 12
UCLA 24, Penn State 22
Syracuse 24, Maryland 7
Stanford 17, Air Force 16
Auburn 23, Kentucky 18
Alabama, 17, Mississippi 16
Wyoming 19, Arizona 0
Princeton 31, Columbia 0
Wayne State 0, John Carroll 0
California 17, Kansas 0
Georgia Tech 3, Clemson 6
Army 10, Boston 0
OTHER SCORES
Penn 7, Brown 0
Rutgers 17, Connecticut 8
Dartmouth 27, Holy Cross 6
Boston U 14, Temple 7
Cornell 49, Lehigh 13
Colgate 7, Yale 0
Marvard 33, Tufts 0
Delaware 15, Gettysburg 0
Rhode Island 13, New Hampshire 0
West Virginia 63, Pittsburgh 48
Virginia Tech 9, William a Mary 7
wake Forest 7, vanderbilt 0
Florida 14, LSU 7
Cincinnati 14, Wichita 6
Navy 10, Oklahoma 0
Nebraska 44, Iowa State 0
Buffalo 18, Massachusetts 6
Oklahoma State 17, Tulsa 14
Colorado 36, Kansas State 0
Slippery Rock 13, Edinboro 0
Mississippi State 48, Tampa 7
Miami, Ohio 36, Western Michigan 9
Idaho 17, Washington State 13
Montana 16 Idaho State 0
Oregon 27, Brigham Young 14
Florida State 9, Baylor 7
South Carolina 13, North Carolina
State7
Arkansas 28, Texas Christian 0
Texas Tech 20, Texas A&M 16
Tulane 24, Miami, Fla. 16
Duke 41, Rice 21

"Today, they were a better team
than we were," said head coach
Bump Elliott. The way he said
"today," you knew he thought his
team should have won.
The game plan, line coach Tony
Mason explained, had been to run
power plays up the middle. The
strategy worked until fullback
Dave Fisher injured his hip two
plays before the Wolverines tack-
ed up their only score.
Up to that point, Michigan was
controlling the game. Only an il-
legal motion call prevented the
Wolverines from scoring the very
first time they owned the football.
Bad Omen
But the penalty only proved to
be an omen of what was to come.
"We just couldn't get any mo-
mentum," explained Elliott. "We'd
have it one play and then we'd
lose it again. Either it would be
a fumble, an interception, or a
penalty."
"At times we would look good,"
added Mason, "but we couldn't
put everything together. You just
can't win that way against a club
like Georgia."
"There's no way to explain it.
It's just something that happened.
How do you explain a punter
juggling the football or the full-
back fumbling twice after I told
him to hold on with both hands
to make sure he wouldn't lose it?"
Kemp Stars
The punter, Stan Kemp, actual-
ly made the game a defensive
battle despite his bobble which led
to Georgia's first field goal. In
the last three quarters, he punted
five times. All but one were in-
side the Georgia 40-yard line.
Kemp consistently pushed the
Bulldogs deep into their own ter-
ritory as he angled his kicks out
of bounds. He seemed able to
control the flight of the ball the
same way Sandy Koufax controls
his curve on the outside corner.
Several of the punts came from
within possible field goal range.
"I did consider trying that," said
Elliott, "but I decided against it."
One of the primary reasons was
that the Wolverines' long field
goal kicker, Jim Detwiler, re-
injured his knee. The coaching
staff is optimistic that he will
be at full strength next week.
Ward Injured
Also injured was Carl Ward who
hurt his hip. His bruise was the
same as Fisher's. Both will be
ready next Saturday.
The injuries were the marks of
an extremely hard fought foot-
ball game. "They just never
stopped battling," said Elliott.
"They were hitting just as hard
at the end as at the beginning."

(continued from Page 1) the scrimmage line. You can't
said maybe, maybe, we can tie it. blame Gabler, you can't blame
Pretty please, fate, let Michigan Smith, you might as well blame
tie it. Coach Bump Elliott sent in fate. That was it for the Wol-
Wally Gabler to bargain with verines.
chance. Should Have Guessed
And Gabler looked like he just You might have guessed that
might salvage it. Fifteen yards to things weren't going to be exactly
Clancy on a sideline play, then 16 Georgia peachy for Michigan from
more on the same pattern. Mich- the onset. A 30-yard touchdown on
igan neared midfield. Then Gab- a halfback trap by Carl Ward was
ler dropped back, but his pocket snatched away by a dinky five
leaked, scarlet closet in, and Gab- yard illegal motion penalty.
ler took off for his skin. With Michigan's only score came in
Georgia on his tail he ran a huge the second quarter. With the Wol-
semicircle behind the line of verines down 3-0, with five min-
scrimmage. Meanwhile, Michigan utes left in the half, Vidmer shot
end Steve Smith took a lonely a 10 yard sideline pass to Clancy,
jaunt toward the Georgia goal. He who made a move any pro would
stopped on the ten, nobody even envy. A sudden fake to the out-
within shouting distance of him, side, a flashy step inside, and he
and hoped, and hoped, and hoped. was off. The defensive back fin-
And poor Gabler kept scramper- ally caught him at the four after
ing. Finally he threw, but it was a 38-yard gain. Tim Radigan
a shorty to fullback Dennis Mor- bammed over three plays later.
gan who lugged the ball back to Rick Sygar added the extra point.

But that was all for scoresville.
Michigan gained yardage, often
held excellent field position, but
couldn't score.
Georgia outgained Michigan in
total yardage 254 to 235, out-
rushed it 174 to 128. Bob Taylor,
a quick-start halfback, lopped off
71 in 13 carries and Ridlehuber
netted 61 in 15. Dave Fisher led
Michigan rushers with 66 in 13
carries, all in first half.
One telling statistic reveals
Georgia's ability to control the
action. The Bulldogs reeled off 41
plays to Michigan's 22 in the sec-
ond half. Ball control, Michigan's
formula, squirted back in the Wol-
verines' faces.
Well, that's tricks. Next week
the real reason begins. And Mich-
igan is still a team in search of a
jell.

NIGHT EDITOR:
BOB McFARLAND

-Daily-Richard Cooper
CONVERGING ON A LONE pigskin, Wolverines and Bulldogs prepare to pounce after Michigan full-
back Tim Radigan fumbled in yesterday's Michigan loss. Unfortunately, the enemy defenders proved

more alert than the Wolverines
the ball only once.
Ridlehuber explained t h a t
Georgia weather had something
to do with the tenacious play. "We
were in great shape for this
game," he bubbled. "We. had to
practice in the heat and humidity,
we had stamina, and when the
weather is cool, you can go harder
a lot longer."
Ridlehuber himself was also in
superb condition. He demonstrat-
ed it in his 22-yard-long, 50-yard-
wide run that set up the winning
score in the fourth quarter.
Sprint-Out Keeper
The play was intended to be an
old-fashioned sprint-out keeper
play to the left, but it turned into
an unorthodox charge around
right end before it was over. "That
play looked like a punt return,"
fumed Mason.
Ridlehuber analyzed his antics
differently. "When I went left, I
saw (Bill) Yearby and (Frank)
Nunley were patallel with me in-
stead of trailing me. Then I knew
no one was behind me, so instead
of trying to get around those two,
I just went the other way."
He shore did and the results
were unpleasant from the Michi-
gan point of view.
One play that just missed was a
long second down pass to tight
end Steve Smith, who had pranced

and recovered. Michigan fumbled three times in the game; losing
some 30 yards past the line of make any difference.
scrimmage, at the Michigan 26. "I got sick after the game,"
"I over threw him by a yard," Mason said soberly, "and I'll get
moaned Vidmer. "It wouldn't have sick every time we lose. We've just
gone for a touchdown because got to go out trying to win every
there was a man behind him, but day. When we win a game we'll
it could have set one up." take it in stride, and go out trying
But there were several plays to win again the next day. No
that just missed. It doesn't really looking back. No looking ahead."

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r r -
(Governmental Revision of
University Policy)
ORGANIZATION MEETING
Monday, Oct. 4
Room 3R-UNION
.X} .r c . 3Y ;;. :::: :a: :;;s.; '..:r?,}:{".:..: ;it. ,::':t " t,. at-w': ?F.o {..«£x,.z - - , .<::' ':..:<T:<:s2 .::":::Ys'. >r. . , :.F . :..." .,,i., .. " :c3. . ":c...... .

i

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Thrown to the Dogs

First Downs
Rushing
Passing
Penalty
Rushes, No.
Net Yards
Passes, No.
Net Yards
Total Plays
Punts, No.
Average Distance
Fumbles, No.
Lost by
Penalties, No.
Yards penalized
MICHIGAN
GEORGIA

MICH.
13
8
5
0
45
128
13
107
58
5
29
3
1
4
51

GA.
16
14
1
1
53
174
14
80
67
6
37
3
0
2
65

PASSING
Michigan
Att.Comp.
9 4
4 3
13 7

0 7 0 0-7
3 3 0.9-15

Vidmer
Gabler
Totals
Ridlehuber
Moore
Totals
PA
Smith
Clancy
Morgan
Totals
Wheeler
Creech
Richter
Hodgson
McWhorter
Taylor
Totals

Yds.
75
32
107

Georgia
Att. t
8
6
14
ASS RECEIVINC
Michigan
No.7
1
5
1
7

Ca
G

3omnp. Yds.
3 28
4 52
7 80

Sa/AII &
State Street

Vidiner
Detwiler
Ward
Fisher
Kemp
Radigan
Morgan
Gabler
Totals

RUSHING
Michigan
Tries
4
5
10
13
1
5
4
3
45
Georgia
Tries
15
6
13
5
7
6
pass 1
53

I

Net
=12
15
43
66
-11
12
4
12
129
Net
61
18
71
12
21
21
-21
174

Ave.
-3.0
3.0
4.3
5.1
-11.0
2.4
1.0
4.0
2.9
Ave.
4.0
3.0
5.5
2.4
3.0
3.5
-21.0
3.3

Georgia
No.
1
1
I
I1
2
1
7
PUNTING
Michigan

i

Yds. Ave.
16 16.0
90 18.0
1 1.0
107 15.3
Yds. Ave.
8 8.0
22 22.0
6 6.0
10 10.0
17 8.5
17 17.0
80 11.4
No. Ave.
5 29
No. Ave.
3 30
3 43
6 37

Ridlehuber
Hurst
Taylor
Wheeler
Moore'
Jekins
Bad centerp
Totals

Kemp

Georgia

Ridlehuber
Moore
'lotals

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