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October 01, 1965 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-10-01

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1, 1965

THE,. MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

1, 1965 THE 1WICHIGAN DAILY

t a.wY UL 7 illy

*Pakistan Threatens to Continue Fighting
Until India Accedes to Plebiscite Demand

LAND WAR SLOWS:
U.S. Hits Viet Cong
In New Air Raids

YOUR 1065-66
STUDENT DIRECTORY
-
OCT. 5 & 6 ONLY
OCT. 4&U5ONLYI

NEW DELHI VP)-India and
Pakistan accused each other again
yesterday, of violating the week-
old UN cease-fire along the fron-
tier of the Indian state of Raja-
sthan.
The Indian Defense Ministry

charged that 500 Pakistani rang-
ers attacked across the frontier
and that they were being rein-
forced.
A Pakistani government broad-
cast said India threw two battal-
ions against a Pakistani post in

C -t
"Send, her a
CONTEMPORARY
CARD by
When you care enough to send the very best
307-309 S. STATE

Rajasthan yesterday morning and
the fighting was continuing. It
said heavy casualties were in-
flicted on the attackers.
Fighting Will Continue
Fighting against Indian forces
in Kashmir will continue until a
plebiscite is guaranteed, says the
president of Azad Kashmir.
President Abdul Hamid told a
news conference Wednesday, "We
will continue the struggle as
long as we have not attained our
objective"-a plebiscite on acces-
sion to India or Pakistan.
Abdul Hamid repeated the claim
that guerilla warfare in the In-
dian-ruled Kashmir valley was be-
ing waged by Kashmiri Moslems
who- want to be governed by Mos-
lem Pakistan instead of the In-
dians, largely Hindu.
India has claimed the fighters
are Pakistani and Kashmiris
trained and equipped by Pakistan
who infiltrated into .the valley.

Abdul Hamid said his govern-
nent, which rules 1.5 million Kash-
miris west of the 1949 cease-fire
line, has no connection with the
Revolutionary Council, whose
members' names have never been
given. But he said he was certain
the council would disband on
achievement of a plebiscite.
Pakistani Raiders
The Indian Defense Ministry al-
so claimed Pakistanis moved two
tanks and a recoilless rifle to new
positions northeast of Husseini-
wala in the Lahore sector. And it
said Pakistani raiders were fleeing
Indian territory in Kashmir, but
were burning houses and killing
civilians on the way.
Maj. Gen. Bruce mMcDonald of
Canada, the chief UN officer, was
in the Lahore sector reportedly
seeking td have both sides with-
draw 500 yards in response to the
United Nation's Sept. 23 cease-
fire plea.

SAIGON (M)-Ground fighting
dwindled yesterday in South Viet
Nam, but U.S. planes pressed the
air war with strikes on both sides
of the border, a U.S. military
spokesman reported.
U.S. B-52's from Guam joined
in the attack again, hammering
a suspected Viet Cong concen-
tration near Cambodia for the
second time in four days.
In the Phu Cu Pass area of
the central highlands, about 45
miles northwest of Qui Nhon,
Navy and Marine pilots struck at
suspected Communist strongholds
where a massive buildup of Viet
Cong forces was reported earlier
by U.S. advisers. The area is one
where the Viet Cong and Viet-
namese fought two bloody bat-
tles.
Ground Fighting
On the ground, U.S. Marines
tangled three times with Commu-
nist guerrillas near Da Nang, 380
miles north of -Saigon, and killed
five, a Marine spokesman said. He
said that Marines suffered light
casualties in one scrap, an at-
tempted ambush, but beat off the
bushwackers.
In other scattered ground fight-
ing, 39 Viet Cong were reported
killed by government troops.
The heavy air strikes by U.S.
planes followed by hours threats
from North Viet Nam to try
American pilots captured in its
territory as war criminals. There
was no indication from Hanoi
whether conviction would mean a
death penalty.
The Communists have an-

'nounced they executed two Amer-
icans Sunday and one in June
in reprisal for executions of Viet
Cong terrorists by the South Viet-
namese.
One American pilot was shot
down yesterday in South Viet
Nam, but he was rescued unhurt.
Five men were executed as mur-
derers and rapists by a firing
squad in the Saigon market place
before dawn today.
Plane Lost
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara said yesterday "the
American plane ' lost over Viet
Nam is presumed to have been
downed by a surface-to-air mis-
sile. McNamara told a news con-
ference it is "not yet certain"
that the plane was downed by
one of the missiles in Communist
North Viet Nam.
He said that if it turns out to
be true, it will mean United States
has lost a total of four aircraft
to the Soviet-built missiles.

IMPORTANT NEWS!Y

For University of Michigan
Faculty and Staff
Michigan Bell invites you to visit
an activated demonstration of
data-phone services and computer
input-output devices.

What's New at 764-1817

(Continued from Page 1)
Long Distance
Michael Smith, a University of
Utah student in special education,
has filed suit against three of his
professors whom he is charging
with "maliciously" persuading the
University of Utah to expel him.
Smith is asking for $102,400 in
damages from Wilberta Moore,
Glenn I. Latham and James E.
Cole. 'Cole ,is head of the special
education department.
* *
Colorado University President
Joseph R. Smiley has declared
that student' unrest on college
campuses reflects a national trend.
"Youth is frustrated and has rea-
son to be," he said, because of the
failure of the older generation to
cope with the challenges- of our
times." Smiley spoke at a Regis
College faculty convocation Wed-
nesday.
When asked about the possibil-
ity of student unrest leading to
demonstrations and civil' disobe-
dience at Colorado University,
Dean of Men James Quigley said,
"The student coming in to the
University is more concerned
about his education and having a
say in his education than ever be-
fore. The student is, more mature
now in wanting to have some in-
fluence on his own education."
* * *
The University of Minnesota

Daily has announced issues for
which their editorial page will be
crusading this year. Among them:
a program of course evaluation;
student participation in political
and social causes; and a master
parking and mass transportation
plan for the university.
Oops, we goofed. The student
directory will go on sale Monday
for $1 at the Michigan Union, on
the ,Diag and by the Engineering
Arch. It was incorrectly reported
that the directory would be going
on sale yesterday.

BEER-PIZZA-BANJOS
BIMBO'S

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The Michigan Union, Rm. 3B,
October 4, noon to 6 p.m.,

October 5 through October 8, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.

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FRONTIER BEEF BUFFET
Cafeteria Open 7 Days
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30 A.M.-8:00 P.M.
Friday and Saturday until 8:30 P.M.

r .
,FOR-FALL ...
a Rich new 'aerials
* i bautifl fall shades.
Tailored by McMullen
Skirts from 18.00
t Sweaters from 25.00
Blouses from 10.00
§ x§-

TAKE
A
BREAK'
D
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E

2333 E: STADIUM

663-9165

"Roast Beef at its Finest"

7 A.M.-8 P.M. Daily

Closed Tuesdays

Old1 Ieidel'be
21 1-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.

.IT'S THE GREATEST !

PreketesSgrBw
Serving the People and
Students of Ann Arbor
Since 1903
* Quality food at the most
reasonable prices
* Your favorite cocktails, beer, wine,
or champagne

71u VIRGINIIN
RESTAURANT
SPECIAL WEEKEND DINNER
ROAT TOM TURKEY
Served with sage dressing, whipped potatoes, . 65
tossed green salad, roll and butter,
coffee, tea, or milk.... ........

Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M.

Closed Mondays

I

STEAK AND SHAKE
1313 South University

i

109 S. Main St.
NO 2-1414

Open 7 A.M.
to 2 A.M.

L

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1/2 lb. CHAR BROILED HAMBURGER
Salad, Potato, Bread and Butter .,... ..

... $1.20

SPAGHETTI WITH MEAT SAUCE
Salad, Bread and Butter. ... ......

$1.10

I

STOP IN AFTER THE SHOW

THE PIN ROOM
COLONIAL LANES
1950S. INDUSTRIAL HIGHWAY
662-3808
JUMBO COCKTAILS,

0
U
T

FEATURING

HOT PASTRAMI AND
CORNED BEEF SANDWICHES

CHARCOAL BROILED
STEAKS, CHOPS, AND
SEA FOOD

421 EAST LIBERTY
665-7003

Open 'til Midnight Monday thru Sunday

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T-/2'/ / I;H 1/afl _-

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40 Red Nine

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