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September 30, 1965 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 30,1065

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

l // .'Dedicated Sygar Earns Grid

uccess

I

-Daily-Richard Cooper
RICK SYGAR PLAYING. HALFBACK for Michigan in last week's California game sweeps around
right end for a gain. Sygar, who can alternate between offense and defense, racked up 60 net yards
in his first full game in the offensive backfield. He replaced an injured Jim Detwiler, coming across
the line from his regular defensive safety-man slot.
EVERY FRIDAY:
Coeds ;LendSport to Co-Ree

By HOWARD KOHN gridders, including Charlie Kines,
Dennis Flanagan, Jim Seiber and
If the test of a football player Jim Berline, in the football a-
is his ability to bounce back with go-go art at Niles McKinley.
renewed enthusiasm when the "Sygar was one of the top high
chips seem stacked against him, school stars I've ever coached,"
would rank high in the annals of Mason says, "and he has developed
gridiron lore, into a well-rounded collegiate
Rick, who is a senior in the player. He can run, block, pass
class room but only a junior on and defend against passes. Prob-
the football field, came back not ably the most impressive qual-
only once but twice from a luckless ity about him, though, is his de-
situation, termination."
In 1963, the first year for Sy- "When he came back after
gar on the varsity team, the 5'1" missing an entire season, he made
a vow never to miss another prac-
sophomore sprintd around right tice," Mason points out. "Since
end with the ball in a scrimmage the,"hM'soneentrdork r-nc
against the "red shirts." A rush then he's been a hard worker-a
ing lineman hit him with a roll- guy whos always trying.
ing block, flipping him into the Deciding Factor
air, while a second red-shirted Sygar, who visited many univer-t
defenseman helped him back to sities before finally selecting
earth with a bruising tackle. Michigan, claims the decidig
Sidelined factor was "the attitude of the
So before Sygar had even a students and faculty toward the1
chance to begin his college ca- athlete." He entered the college
reer, he was on the sidelines with of architecture and design with
a broken leg. Big Ten officials plans for a major in architecture.
extended another year of eligibil- Over at Michigan Stadium hisa
ity to him and Sygar went to plans were somewhat less defi-
classes on a pair of crutches. nite. After his misfortune at the
Then that fall, during one of halfback spot, the 182-pound Sy-
the typical slush-and-sleet per- gar was shifted to the defensive
iods treasured by the Ann Arbor backfield.
weatherman, Sygar slipped on an Last season, he played almost
icy walk and fractured his newly all of his 285 minutes in the sec-
healed leg in nearly the identical
spot. GRIESE TOPS POLL
He remembers that he felt
"rather discouraged," but playing
football was very important to him Y earby,a
and he was "too young yet to Y en o e
think of retirement." The next
season he returned with vigor I
creditable to an American soldier lvgANm iAmey
leaving Viet Nam (alive) and ably
assisted in a Big Ten champion-
ship and Rose Bowl drive. The Associated Press last night
Potential rated Michigan's Bill Yearby and
Since the fifth grade, when he Tom Mack as prominent All-
first started throwing and running America prospects.
with the pigskin, Sygar has dem- The two Wolverine linemen
onstrated unlimited potential as joined a select crew headed by
an all-around grid player. Purdue's Bob Griese. The Boiler-
At McKinley High in Niles, maker topped the first report by
Ohio, where he played his high the AP's regional All-America
school football under the tutorship board and was selected AP Back
of Tony Mason, the dynamic half- of the Week.
back earned enough honors crash- "Griese probably is the stand-
ing through opposing linemen and out collegiate player in the na-
hauling in circus-type areials that tion," observedboard member
he could have easily opened his Gordon Graham of the Lafayette,
own pawn shop with individual Ind., Journal and Courier.
plaques and trophies. Other early All-America pros-
Prominent among his awards pects include:
were Athlete of the Year and Back Ends - Jim Beirne, Purdue;
of the Year distinctions for the Dave Long, Iowa; Aaron Brown,
state of Ohio. Minnesota; John Wright, Illinois;
Mason Helps Gene Washington, Michigan State;
Sygar credits Mason with much Cas Banaszek, Northwestern; and
of his success. He describes his Alan Page, Notre Dame.
coach as a "fantastic personality." Tackles-Karl Singer and Jer-
Mason, who followed Sygar to ry Shay, Purdue, and Gale Gil-
Michigan last year and became lingham, Minnesota.
offensive line coach, instructed Guards-Dick Arrington, Notre
several other current Wolverine Dame, and John Nilan, Iowa.

,.On defense last year he fash-
ioned a commendable performance
defending against such top ends as
Bob Hadrick of Purdue, Gene
Washington of MSU and Aaron
Brown of Minnesota. The tough-
est part of his job, though, is "fig-
4 uring out the quarterback."
"Even the best receivers can't
make the catch if the quarterback
isn't on target," he says. Sygar
singled out Bob Griese of Purdue
and Gary Snook of Iowa as two of
"the most personally feared sig-
nal-callers in the country."
Better Team
This year he feels the Wolver-
ines have a "finer team than last
season." Sygar believes "that
Michigan has developed a winning
attitude, as opposed to the atti-
RICK SYGAR tude of a few years ago, and this
is essential to be a champion."
ondary, guarding against enemy Sygar has no personal goals
air attacks. However, one of his set for the 1965 season except
biggest thrills happened while that he'd "like to play on the na-
playing offense in the Michigan tional championship team." Head
State game. Coach Bump Elliott has used the
Switched back to his familiar versatile junior on both offense
spot at half, Sygar grabbed a and defense in the first two games.
short lateral from quarterback
Bob Timberlake and hurled a 31-
'yard touchdown pass to John
Henderson. The completed pass,
his only attempt of the season,
proved to be the margin of vic-
tory over the Spartans.S

Elliott started him in the sec-
ondary in the North Carolina con-
test and then moved him into the
starting halfback slot against Cal-
ifornia when Jim Detwiler suffered
a knee injury.
Sygar himself has no prefer-
ence for either side of the line,.
saying, "I like to play football, and
either way it's still football."
A professional gridiron career
for Sygar is a distinct possibility.
The oft-smiling player says, "If
I'm drafted by a pro team, I'll
certainly give the big time a try.
I figure I owe it to myself after
all these years of playing ball."

JARTERS

.]By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
The chance to keep physically
fit while competing with a grace-
ful coed is an unbeatable oppor-
tunity, but Michigan proudly of-
fers it once a week in its co-
recreational sports program.
Every Friday 7-10 p.m. at the
I-M Bldg. healthy male specimens
can show their athletic prowess on
four volleyball and three badmin-
ton courts, as well as on the tram-
poline or in the intramural pool.
Swimming is the most popular ac-
tivity, but sign-up sheets for pad-
dleball are filled hours in ad-
vance. Naturally, girls get first
preference.
Many Reasons
Detached study of the partici-

pants reveals a cross-section of
students with a variety of reasons
for coming-anything from houses
wishing to perfect their intramur-
al techniques to frustrated diet-
ers. The only things that remain
fairly constant are the crowds
(large) and the ratio of coeds (40
per cent).
The co-recreationan program
was founded in 1930 by Intramur-
al Sports Director Elmer T. Mitch-
ell. By last year it had expanded
to an average of 300 participants
a week, and this year estimates are
even higher. Though one of the
few extra-curricular programs not
hurt by the trimester, lack of both
physical and locker facilities will
block expansion.
Need Building
Associate I-M Director Rodney
Grambeau notes the need for a
special co-recreational building.
He cites the well-developed pro-
gram at Purdue which offers both
competitive and individual.activi-
ties in such sports as tennis, golf,
badminton, softball and archery
in a special co-recreation build-
ing.
Though there are no definite
plans for expansion in the future,

the I-M administrators would like
to introduce table tennis, weight-
lifting (yes, there are even girls
interested in it), and an outdoor

program including
Michigan program.

golf into thel

k Prominent
iea Rating f
Switched back to his familiar
Linebackers -- George Webster,
Michigan State, and Don Han-
sen, Illinois.
Quarterbacks - Steve Juday,
Michigan State; John Hankinson,
Minnesota; Fred Custardo, Illi-
nois, and Gary Snook, Iowa.
Halfbacks-Bill Wolski, Notre
Dame; Gordon Teter, Purdue;
Clint Jones, Michigan State; and
Ron Rector, Northwestern.
Fullbacks-Bill Grabowski, Illi-
nois, and Bob Apisa, Michigan
State.

FrU LeVi S
K1Ane's
306-10 S. MAIN

V. 'V
8

Pylons Used
In End Zone
Special To The Daily
CHICAGO - After 70 years of
Big Ten football, the nation's old-
est conference decided to elimi-
nate the corner flags on the foot-
ball field and replace- them with
specially designed rubber pylons.
In pastseasons the fourred
flags posed rather ticklishi prob-
lems for officials. They are found
at the inside corners of the four
intersections of the goal lines and
side lines.
Spectators at the Michigan-
California game might have noted
the presence of these red-orange
pylons instead of the customary
flags.

YOUR HEADQUARTERS
FOR LEVI'S
E
AS A
WLWILD
state Street on the Campus"

-

-1

Across
Campus

f $'.

I I

THURSDAY, SEPT. 30
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild presents "The Earrings of
Mme. de X" in the Architecture
Aud.
8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program presents the APA
company in "You Can't Take It
with You" at the Mendelssohn
Theater.
8:00 p.m-C. Hart Schaff, a
director 'in the permanent secre-
tariat of the UN and Executive
Agent of the Meking Development
Committee, will speak on "Eco-
nomic Cooperation in the Mekong
Valley" in the Rackham Amphi-
theater.
9 p.m-Organizational meeting
of the new Students for a Demo-
cratic Society chapter in Rm. 3C
of the Union.
FRIDAY, OCT. 1
4:15. p.m.-Prof. Daniel Kahne-
man of the Hebrew University in
Israel, will speak on "Temporal
Effects in the Resolution of Form"
in Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m. - The Cinema
Guild presents "The Earrings of
Mme. de X" in the Architecture
Aud.
8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program presents "You Can't
Take It With You" at Mendel-
ssohn Theater.
SATURDAY, OCT. 2
8 p.m.-The Professional Thea-
tre Program presents 'You Can't
Take It With You" at the Men-
delssohn Theater.

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