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September 29, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-29

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER 29. 19ft5

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY WFDNF5~BAV ~FPT~MRFT? 90 1C~i~

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Georgia Attack 'Upsetting'

OPENING MEETING TONIGHT:
Lettermen Restore 3M' Club

By CHUCK VETZNER
Lay your wagers, support your
side of the Mason-Dixon Line,
and get set for a humdinger of a
football game.
Big Ten champion Michigan
takes on Southeastern Conference
leader Georgia.
That's the agenda for'Saturday
at Michigan Stadium, much to
the delight of Southern folks who
claim the SEC is best and
Yankees who feel the Big Ten still
reigns supreme.
Stop Aggression
"Georgia is as tough a club as
we'll face this year," says end
coach Jocko Nelson, who scouted
the Bulldogs' opening two victories
of the year. "It's a fighting ball
club, strong and aggressive and
always coming at you. If we beat
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE

W
x-Minnesota 99
Baltimore 92
Chicago 92
Detroit 87
Cleveland 84
New York 75
California 74
Washington 68
Boston 61
Kansas iCty 59
x-Clinched pennant.

L
59
64
67
72
73
84
85
90
98
99

Pet.
.627
.590
.579
.547
.535
.472
.465
.430
.384
.373

GB
6
7l
1212
14Y2
24%1
25
31
38Y2
40

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
California 4, Boston 3
Baltimore 4, Minnsota 2
Cleveland 6, New York 3
Chicago 4-3, Detroit 3-4 (1st 11 inn)
Washington 6-6, Kansas City 1-8
TODAY'S GAMES
California at Boston
New York at Cleveland (n)
Kansas City at Washington (n)
Minnesota at Baltimore (n)
Only games scheduled
NATIONAL LEAGUE
WV L Pct. GB
Los Angeles 92 64 .59 G-
San Francisco 92 65 .586 %
Cincinnati 88 68 .564 4
Pittsburgh 86 72 .544 7
Milwaukee 84 73 .535 8 f
Philadelphia 81 76 .516 11%
St. Louis 76 80 .487 16
Chicago 72 86 .456 21
Houston 64 93 A408 281/
New York 50 108 .316 43
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 7, Houston 1
New York 1, Pittsburgh 0 (12 inn)
Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1'
St. Louis 9, San Francisco 1
Los Angeles 1, Cincinnati 1 (9 inn)
TODAY'S GAMES
Pittsburgh at New York
St. Louis at San Francisco
Cincinnati at Los Angeles
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
NSU
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them by even one point, we will
have done-a good job."
It is also the type of squad that
takes advantage of an opponent's
mistakes. Nelson pointed out that
Georgia has already scored three
touchdowns this year .. . on de-
fense (fumble recovery, intercep-
tion, and punt return).
This is'fair warning for Mich-
igan that an abrupt about-face is
needed from''the sloppy play that
has led to ten fumbles and three
interceptions in its first two
games.
Bullunderers
Most likely the Bulldogs will
still enter the game as underdogs
as well. But this position does not
seem to botherdthem. Last season
they were predicted to finish at
the bottom of the conference and
they tied for second.
They have already pulled one of
this year's major upsets by beat-
ing Alabama with a desperation
touchdown pass-lateral play in the
final minutes.
Actually Georgia usually does
not go in for such fancy antics.
"They're a typical Southern foot-
ball team," says Nelson. "They
like to run. They will hit the mid-
dle, but they especially like power
sweeps."
QB and Punt Return
The key man for these plays is
the quarterback, either Preston
Ridlehuber or Kirby Moore. Rid-
lehuber is the acknowledged first
stringer, and was the most val-
uable player in last year's Sun
Bowl game. A fine passer, he can
also run well. He's the man who
returned a punt for a touchdown
on an 82-yard run.
Moore is only a sophomore and
often comes in for a specific play
called by last season's SEC coach
of the year, Vince Dooley. This
system works well, seeing as how
Moore came in to throw a touch-
down pass in the Alabama game.
Nelson is also high on tailbacks
Elton (Bob) Taylor ("He runs like
Jim Detwiler . . . fast and power-
ful.") and Charles (R a n d y)
Wheeler ("He's very fast and
shifty.")
The Bulldogs might have a typ-
ical Southern offense, but they
don't have a stereotyped Dixie
line, usually made up of linemen
faster than jackrabbits, more agile
Welcome
Students
It's a Michigan tradition to have
your hair styled by our
tonsorial experts
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U-M BARBERS
Near Kresge's

than squirrels, and lighter than
cornbread.
In fact, the Bulldog line is heav-
ier than Michigan's. Especially
prominent is 207-pound defensive
tackle George Patton, who is "one
of the best" according to Nelson.
AP Major-College
Football Poll
The vote with points on a 10-
9-8-7-6-5-4-3-2-1- basis and first
place ballots in parentheses:
1. Texas (15) 2-0 389
2. Purdue (14) 2-0 381
3. Nebraska (13) 2-0 363
4. Arkansas (3) 2-0 264
5. Louisiana Sta'te 2-0 248
6. Kentucky (1) 2-0 168
7. MICHIGAN 2-0 166
8. Notre Dame 1-1 144
9. Michigan State 2-0 73
10. Georgia 2-0 69
Other teams receiving votes in-
cluded: Alabama, Arizona, Baylor,
Duke, Illinois, Iowa, Maryland, Mis-
sissippi, Mississippi State, North
Carolina, Ohio State, Oregon,
Pittsburgh, Southern California,
Washington State, West Virginia,
Wyoming.

By CHUCK VETZNER
After a two-year hiatus, the
University "M" Club is regrouping
its forces.
The club has an outstanding
tradition as a fraternal organiza-
tion of Michigan athletes and
managers, but after the 1963
school year its activities virtually
ceased.
Tonight, a group of captains
and other interested athletes are
seeking to revive the club with a
membership meeting at 7:30 p.m.
in Room 3R of the Michigan
Union.
Barry MacDonald, '66, a meni-
ber of the hockey team and presi-
dent-elect of M' club, hassbeen
one of the primary figures in-
volved in the re-establishment.
Wonder
"I just wondered what had hap-
pened to the club, and wanted to
know if it could be started again,"
MacDonald explains. After talking
to athletic director H. O. (Fritz)

Crisler and several members of
the coaching staff, MacDonald
contacted the captains of the
athletic teams.
"Everybody was in favor of re-
turning the organization to its
former status," MacDonald noted.
"When it is functioning it can be
a big help in raising the spirits
of the athletes, which in turn
helps the spirit of the entire
campus."
Traditionally some of the ac-
tivities of 'M' Club included two
yearly social gatherings, monthly
meetings featuring special pro-
grams and speakers, various pro-
jects with the graduate 'M' Club,
and special athletic outings.
Pinned
Members were also entitled to
use the 'M' Club Room (a study
and recreation facility in Yost
Field House), privileges from some
local merchants, and lapel pins
which in the past two years had
been given out to all varsity let-

ter winners rather than club
members.
There actually is no explana-
tion for the demise of the organi-
zation. The 1962-63 club elected
officers for the following year, but
they didn't take care of their re-
sponsibilities. No meetings were
held after that point.
One of the major steps taken
this year has been the drafting of
a new constitution and the elec-
tion of officers.
"Tonight's meeting is actually
just to see if everyone is interested
in bringing the club back, and
laying the groundwork for the
year's activities," M a c D o n a 1 d
points out. "We have a lot of
plans, but we can't go any farther
unless the players want to help
carry them out.

IL,

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