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September 28, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER. 2$, 1965

THE MIHIAN AIY-----Y SPTMBE-2---s

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Torn

Cartilage

for

By HOWARD KOHN
Like the fabled weakness of
the Greek warrior Achilles who
was felled by an arrow into his
armor of the Wolverine gridders
seems to be the knee.
Bill Keating, 225-pound start-
ing offensive guard for Michi-
gan, joined the ranks of the spec-
tators for the remainder of the
1965 season with a torn cartilage
suffered in Saturday's game. Doc-
tors, who performed surgery Sun-
day on the injury, reported the
senior will not be able to 'play
'M' Club
All undergraduate lettermen
are invited to attend a meet-
ing of the reorganized "M"
Club in Room 3R of the Union
Wednesday at 7:30 p.m.
football for at least two or three
months.
Third One
The knee injury to Keating was
the third to strike Michigan's
"Achilles heel" in two games. In
the season opener, left halfback
Jim Detwiler and defensive guard
Barry Dehlin were sidelined with
banged up knees.
Both Detwiler and Dehlin did
take part in a light drill yester-
day for the first time since the
North Carolina game. Head Coach'
Bump Elliott is hopeful that the
two starters can return to the
lineup this Saturday against Geor-
gia.
Flanagan In
A replacement for Keating will
have to be found, however, among
a plethora of reserves. Elliott
tentatively named 220-pound sen-
ior Dennis Flanagan to fill the
gap at the offensive guard posi-
tion.
Keating, whose brother Tom
starred for "M" at tackle for three
years, played in all 10 games for
last year's Rose Bowl champions
on defense. He saw 31 minutes of
action in the season finale
against Ohio State and 25 min-
utes on New Year's Day.
Shifted to Offense
This season Keating was shift-,
ed to the offensive line to pro-
vide guidance as an experjenced
letterman. He showed great prom-
ise in the spring drills, and the
coaches had predicted an out-
standing year for him.
With his injury coming in the
early part of the season, before
any Big Ten competition, con-
SCORES
LATE GRID PICKS SCORE
Whitewater State 21, River Falls 21

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ference officials "may" extend an- our techniques in the drills this
other year of eligibility to Keat- week. It would be foolish to mere-
ing. ly overlook this constant fumbl-
A bright spot for Elliott in the ing," said Elliott yesterday.
California game was the play- Tony Mason, offensive line;
ing of hulking Paul (Chief) John- coach, commented that "the man
son who severely bruised his ribs who can cure either baldness or
against North Carolina. The 230- fumbling could make a fortune."
pound Johnson, after missing Michigan's sputtering offensea
most of last week's practice, play- will also be of primary concern
ed the entire game Saturday and as the team prepares for the Geor-
came up with a game-saving fum- gia encounter. Mason, explaining
ble recovery with 59 seconds left last week's spotty showing, said
in the game. "Little mistakes hurt us. A hold-
Key Role ing or clipping penalty always
Fumbling, or more correctly the seemed to be stopping the of-
frequency of fumbles, played an fense. A second down and 20 play
instrumental role in the Califor- is much different than second
nia game. Besides the last-min- and five. The defense takes ad-
ute-snatch of Johnson's, the pig- vantage of the fact the offense
skin was bobbled five more times must go for long yardage."
-all by Michigan. The Wolver- 'Without Penalties'
ines lost possession twice to up "Without those penalty inter-
their season total of "fumbles ruptions, though, we would have
lost" to seven, moved the ball more consistent-
In reviewing the statistics of ly," added Mason.
the first two games, it is inter- Quarterback 'Dick Vidmer, who
esting to note that "M" has had replaced i starting field general
only eight offensive drives stop- Wally, Gabler Saturday after 10
ped by the opposing defense while plays, was responsible for 133
yards gained (103 by passing)
against California. The sophomore
Track Club #completed eight passes in 14 at-
The Ann Arbor track club tempts and had two intercepted.
will hold an organizational Elliott declared yesterday that
meeting in the "M" room of "Vidmer will probably start Sat-
Yost Fieldhouse Wednesday at urday and will now be primar-
5 p.m. All interested men and ily playing first string."
women are invited;to attend. In Backfield
In the offensive backfield with
they surrendered the ball 11 times Vidmer will be fullback Dave Fish-
on fumbles or pass interceptions. er and halfbacks Carl Ward, Rick
"We will just have to perfect Sygar or Detwiler. Sygar, who be-
Major League Standings

Season'
gan the season on defense, took
over for Detwiler in the Califor-
nia victory and averaged 4.3 yards
per carry. Detwiler's return would
give Elliott the choice of alternat-
ing running backs.

Full Time & Evening Employment
AGE 18-35
If you ore. free four evenings each week and occasionally on Saturday,
you con maintain your studies and still enjoy u port-time job doing
special interview work that will bring an average weekly income of $67.
If you are neat appearing and a hard worker call Mr. Jones at 761-
1488 Monday-Friday. No other times.
We are also interested in full-time employment.

I

I

Elliott remarked, after Mich-I
igan's performance Saturday; "We '
were not a great team. We hurt
ourselves on many occasions and
we will have to practice." f
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
JIM TINDALL
BEER-PIZZA-BANJOS
BIMBO'S

.rn..r

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If the engine is still good in your present car and the
body is bad, stop in today and let us give you a free
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SUB

-Daily-Jim.Lines
STARTING GUARD BILL KEATING is helped off of the field
in the third quarter of Saturday's game .against California by
Charles Kines (78) and Ray O'Donnell (69). Keating underwent
surgery Sunday and will be out of action for the rest of the
season.
THIS WEEK'S GAMES r

t

SCRIBE NOW
76-4-0558'

*

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB

x-Minnesota
Baltimore
Chicago
Detroit
Cleveland
New York
California
Washington
Boston
Kansas City
x-Clinched

99 58 .631 -
91 64 .587 7
91 66 .580 8
86 71 .548 13
83 73 .532 15 V
75 83 .475 24hz
73 85 .462 26%/
67 89 .429 31Y4
61 97 .386 38/
58 98 .372 40/
pennant Sunday.

1. Georgia at MICHIGAN
(pick score)
2. Purdue at SMU
'3. Northwestern at No,tre Dame
4. Illinois at Michigan State
5. Iowa at Wisconsin
6. Missouri at Minnesota
7. Ohio State at Washington
8. Indiana at Texas
9. UCLA at Penn State
10. Syracuse at Maryland
The Daily received its first for-
eign entry in grid picks today. Mr.
Mao Tse-tung, a young Chinese
student riow residing in Pakistan,
sent us his selections on a sheet
of rice paper. Unfortunately they
arrived too late for the judging.
Tse-tung picked Michigan to
bomb California, since the Wol-
verines had the stronger air at-
tack.
The real winner in last week's
contest was J. Mines who residies
in University Towers (affection-
ately known as Super Quad)
Mines picked 16 winners, and won
two tickets to the Michigan The-
atre.
Pick up your entry at The Daily
today for this week's contest. If
you send an entry form to one of
your friends overseas, make sure
that it is returned by midnight Fri-
day.

11. Stanford at Air Force
12. Kentucky at Auburn
13. Mississippi vs. Alabama at
Birmingham
14. Arizona at Wyoming
15. Princeton at Columbia
16. Wayne State at John Carroll
17. Kansas at California
18. Clemson at Georgia Tech
19. Boston College at Army
20. Eureka at St. Procopius

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet. GB
San Francisco 92 64 .590 -
x-Los Angeles 91 64 .587 >
x-Cincinnati 88 67 .568 31
Pittsburgh 86 71 .548 6!!,
x-Milwaukee 83 72 .535 8
Philadelphia 81 75 .519 11
St. Louis 75 80 .484 16r
Chicago 71 81 .452 21x
x-Houston 63 92 .406 28/".
New York 58 97 .312 43;
x-Late games not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Chicago 1, Philadelphia 0
San Francisco 8, St. Louis 4
TODAY'E GAMES
St. Louis at San Francisco (n)
Cincinnati at Los Angeles (n)
Milwaukee at Houston (n)
Chicago at Philadelphia (n)
Pittsburgh at New York (n)

r ... w i s w s o ir wiiri M r w rr w ii

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 6, Kansas City 4
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
. Detroit at Chicago (2)
Los Angeles at Boston
Minnesota at Baltimore (n)
Kansas City at Washington (2)
New York at Cleveland (n)

r I

1

4

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MAO TSE-TUNG

Pro Football Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE
Western Conference
W L T Pct.Pts.
Green Bay 2 0 0 1.000 61
Detroit 2 0 0 1.000 51
San Francisco 2 0 0 1.000 79
Baltimore 1 1 0 .500 52
Los Angeles 1 1 0 .500 30
Chicago 0 2 0 .000 52
Minnesota 0 2 0 .000 45
Eastern Conference
W L T Pct, Pts.
Dallas" 2 0 0 1.000 48
Cleveland 1 1 0 .500 30
Philadelphia 1 1 0 .500 48
St. Louis 1 1 0 .500 76
New York 1 1 0 .500 18
Pittsburgh 0 2 0 .000 26
Washington 0 2 0 .000 14
Sunday's Results
Detroit 31, Minnesota 29
Green Bay 20, Baltimore 17

OP
26
29
41
36
48
82
66
OP
9
56
43
47
45
68
34

St. Louis 49, Cleveland 13
New York 16, Philadelphia 14
Dallas 17, Washington 7
San Francisco 27, Pittsburgh 17
' Los Angeles 30, Chicago 28

-

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L T Pct. Pts. 0
Buffalo 3 0 0 1.000 87+
Houston 2 1 0 .667 75
New York 0 3 0 .000 52
Boston 0 3 0 .000 271
Western Division
W L T Pct. Pts. U
San Diego 2 0 1 1.000 61?
Oakland. 2 1 0 .667 64
Kansas City 1 1 1 .500 34
Denver 1 2 0 .333 73
Sunday's Results
Buffalo 33, New York 21
Oakland 21, Houston 17
San Diego 10, Kansas City 10 (tie)
Only games scheduled

OP
43
52
74
82
OP
47
44
57
74

FRESHMEN.
INTERESTED IN STUDENT GOVERNMENT?
BE ACTIVE IN SGC
FOR INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT SGC PERSONNEL DIRECTOR
WE SEEK ALL INTERESTED PEOPLE

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pc : ."*
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1542 SAB

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL

663-0553

1

Here's one way to the top...there's another
Joining the family business is certainly one way to the top. Joining the Bell
System's another. You'll have to work harder getting a foothold, but once you're
on the way up, you'll have the satisfaction of knowing you made it on your own.
But our standards are high-most offers go to better-than-average students. Find
out more when the Bell System Recruiting Team* comes to your campus. Your
Placement Office can arrange an appointment for you with representatives from:
AMERICAN TELEPHONE AND TELEGRAPH COMPANY-LONG LINES DEPARTMENT-Furnishes
interstate Long Distance service.
WESTERN ELECTRIC COMPANY-Manufactures, distributes and installs telephone equipment
for the Bell System. Also missile, guidance and control system projects.
BELL TELEPHONE LABORATORIES-Provides R&D for the Bell System. Missile, guidance
and control system projects.
SANDIA CORPORATION - R&D on non-nuclear phases of atomic weapons for the A.E.C.
MICHIGAN BELL TELEPHONE COMPANY -Representing each of the 21 operating companies
providing communications service on a local level.
*This team will consider all qualified applicants for employment
without regard to race, creed, color or, national origin. Bt
Bell System ,,

I.

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