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September 28, 1965 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-28

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TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1985

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE TH11EI

TUEDA, SPTMBR 2, 985TH MCHIANDAIY AC~ Ttlls

" ra .1 Ju 1[l1V;iG

20

D.C. Home

Rule

Bill Wins House

Te
their own of- I

WASHINGTON (P)-A bill to
give District of Columbia residents
self-government reached t h e
House floor yesterday and its
backers won two quick test votes.
The public galleries were crowd-
ed. A hush settled over the cham-
ber as the reading clerk droned
through the first roll call, a vote
on whether to take up the ques-
tion. When it was over, home rule
cleared its first hurdle 213 to 183.
Thirty-one Republicans joined
182 Democrats in the majority on
this test vote, while 96 Republi-
cans and 87 Democrats voted
against.
On a second procedural vote
that followed immediately, home
rule backers won 222 to 179.
Rep. Adam Clayton Powell (D-
NY), in a speech prepared for
the long debate that followed,
said the home bill is as much a

civil rights bill
rights bill.

as the voting

"Why should any legislator re-
sist endowing 800,000 Americans in
the nation's capital with the same
right possessed by 190 nillion of
their fellow citizens?" the Negro
congressman asked.
"The answer to that question is
as simple as it is tragic. The only
reason home rule for the District
of Columbia is an issue today is
because a majority of the citizens
of this city are Negro," Powell
said.
"That single shameful truth
about this legislation obscures and
overrides all other considerations.
Deep in our hearts, we all know
that the numerical fact of life
about our nation's capital-that
a majority of its citizens are
black-has alone shoved the home

rule bill into the watershed of
controversial legislation." "
Opponents of home rule got a
brief chance to give their case
before the first role call came,
Rep. Joel T. Broyhill (R-Va)
said the bill's backers "have ad-
mitted it is a bad bill," by chang-
ing it "in clandestine meetings or
a smoke-filled room."
The home rule strategists, after
a nose count which indicated that
a Senate-passed home rule bill
would be defeated in the House,
changed several provisions last
week to attract more votes.
The most important change was
elimination of an automatic year-
ly payment to the city government
from the U.S. Treasury. Instead,
city officials would have to justify
their budgets before the appro-
priations committees of Congress
annually as they do now.

Rep. John L. McMillan (D-SC),
chairman of the House District
Committee which for years was
the graveyard of home rule bills,
said the present bill's backers are
"ready to give this city away
to some private group."
Backers of the bill had ex-
pected filibuster tactics from its
opponents. Nothing like that de-
veloped immediately.
But McMillan forced a time-
consuming quorum call immedi-
ately after the second procedural
vote when many members had left
to eat lunch. As soon as that was
over, Rep. Joe D. Waggoner (D-
La) forced another.
Rep. Carlton R. Sickles (D-
Md), one of the bipartisan group
of four representatives who re-
vamped the home rule bill this
week, said it is "a matter of simple
justice" for district residents, who

haven't voted for
ficials since 1874.

The district now is ruled by
three commissioners named by the
president and committees of Con-
gress, including McMillian's.
The House first voted on a dis-
charge petition to get the bill to
the floor by bypassing normal
committee procedures. Many con-
servatives oppose this practice on
principle, which could account for
the low majority of 213 aye votes,
less than half of the current 433
House membership. The bill's
backers say they expect a mini-
mum of 235 votes for final pass-
age later this week.
The bill would provide for an
elected mayor and City Council
system, an elected school board
and a nonvoting delegates to the
House of Representatives.

t Votes
Democratic Leader Carl Albert
of Oklahoma told the House the
discharge petition "is a democra-
tic procedure," and its purpose
was to extend democratic pro-
cedures to district residents, who
haven't voted for their own of-
ficials since 1874.
Rep. Basil L. Whitener (D-NC)
called it a "sledgehammer resolu-
tion." He said the late Speaker
Sam Rayburn had opposed home
rule and "it is a poor momument
to that great American" to bring
it before the House in this way.
Rep. Abraham J. Multer (D-
NY) said every year for years he
had asked the House District of
Columbia Committee to hold hear-
ings on home rule, and that it
never was done until after the
discharge petition was filed in
August.

If

LENOY IMPORTS
DISTINCTIVE GIFTS

Mexican Iandicraf t
Sweaters
Pottery
MAYNARD HOUSE

Woolen Goods
Sara pes
Gifts
524 E. WILLIAM

We strongly urge the repeal of the Regents'
Ruling of 1929 (R.P. 1926-29 p. 1016) which
precludes the establishment of a university book-
store. We believe the University should establish
such a store so as to provide books and supplies
to students at the lowest possible cost.
We believe the University should be actively
concerned with the students economic welfare'
when this welfare coincides with their educa-
tional welfare.
-SGC Committee on the University Bookstore

Security C
Cease-Fire

ouncil-

Seeks

USSR Economy To
Undergo Changes

Enforcement
IS hastri Asks

/

"Has television made a comedy series outa' this
Viet Nam war yet.. ?"
AFTER TWO YEARS:
Jaun Bosch Returns to Santo Domingo;
Criticizes U.S., Demands Compensation

UN To Stay,
Out of India
Renewed Outbreaks
Threaten Present
Cease-Fire Truce
UNITED NATIONS (P) - The
United Nations Security Council
approved unanimously last night a
new demaind that India and Pak-
istan observe the UN cease-fire,
and withdraw their forces to po-
sitions held on Aug. 5.
U.S. chief delegate Arthur J.
Goldberg, council president, intro-
duced the resolution at an urgent
session of the council convened
at 7:02 p.m. (EDT).
He said wording of the resolu-
tion had been approved in private
consultations among the 11 coun-
cil members, and there was no
need to put the resolution to a
vote.
Then he declared the resolution
adopted without opposition.
The resolution demands that In-
dia and Pakistan "honor their
commitment to the Security Coun-
cil to observe the cease-fire."
It calls on both parties "prompt-
ly to withdraw all armed personnel
as necessary steps in full imple-
mentation of the resolution of
Sept. 20."
That resolution demanded a
cease-fire and troop withdrawal.
India and Pakistan agreed last
Wednesday to accept the cease-
fire, but since then violence has
erupted on the cease-fire line with
India and Pakistan blaming each
other for the violations.
Goldberg tried to adjourn the
emergency council meeting, im-
mediately after adoption of the
resolution and thus avoid any open
debate between India and Paki-
stan delegates at the council ta-
ble.
But Indian Ambassador G. Par-
thsarathi asked to be heard. He
declared that the resolution should
be directed at Pakistan, saying
that country bore therblame for
violation of the cease-fire.
Pakistan Foreign Minister Z. A.
Bhutto countered with charges of
repeated violations of the cease-
fire by India.
Secretary-General U Thant sub-
mitted a report to the council
saying that the military situation
"throughout the area of the con-
flict continues to be fluid."
Thant had been directed by the
council to enforce its demand for
the cease-fire and troop withdraw-
al.
Prime Minister Lal Bahadur
Shastri ruled out yesterday any
United Nations peace force on In-
dian soil, while a member of his
government spoke of making nu-
clear weapons for the nation's de-
fense.
The Indian army reported fight-
ing continued against Pakistan,
despite the UN cease-fire.
Shastri told a meeting of his
top parliamentary aides he had
informed UN Secretary-General U
Thant that India would accept
"only observers on the old pat-
tern."
UN observers have been patrol-
ling the India-Pakistan front in
disputed Kashmir since 1949 but
both sides have pushed them aside
in their continuing bloody war-
fare.
It was obvious that India
wanted to continue to be responsi-
ble for peace on its own frontiers.
Shastri told his aides that in
communications with Thant he
,inr nA n4ann af +. -n4,nn +l-n

MOSCOW (A)-Premier Alexei
N. Kosygin outlined yesterday his
scheme for invigorating the leth-
argic Soviet economy at a closed
meeting of the Soviet Communist
party's powerful Central Commit-
tee.
Kosygin was believed to have
proposed extending profit motive
and other liberal economic con-
cepts.
The listing of Kosygin and Brez-
hnev as the main speakers ap-
peared to substantiate reports
from Communist party sources
that there would be no major
leadership changes at this meet-
ing.
Khrushchev was ousted at a sim-
ilar meeting last October and his
duties assigned to Kosygin and
Brezhnev.
Tass, the official Soviet news
agency, said Kosygin's speech was
titled, "On improving the manage-
ment of industry, perfecting plan-
ning and strengthening economic
incentives of industrial produc-
tion." It did not print any of his
remarks.
Leading Figure in Change
Kosygin, former chief of the
Soviet textile industry, has been
a leading figure in economic
changes instituted since Khrush-
chev's downfall.
After Kosygin completed his
speech, the issues he raised were
debated by various party leaders,
Tass said, but this usually means
the other speakers echo the words
of the main speaker.
Considered Agriculture
The Central Committee, with
some 175 members, has met only
once since removing Khrushchev
and that meeting, in March, it

dealt with agricultural problems.
Brezhnev had said in advance
that this meeting would concen-
trate on industry, including the
Soviet economic plan for 1966-70.
Outlines Projects
The party paper Pravda outlin-
ed projects for the Central Com-
inittee in an editorial which did
not, however, mention the meet-
ing under way.
It listed the goals as improve-
ment in industrial planning and
management, enlarging the inde-
pendence of industrial units, wid-
er use of pay and fringe-benefit
incentives for workers and man-
agers, and ,improvements in the
use of capital, the quality of pro-
duction and the productivity of
labor.

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WASHINGTON (R) - Former
President Juan D. Bosch return-
ed to the Dominican Republic
and an active role in the violent
political life of the country by
his own choice, and through his
own arrangements, U.S. officials
insisted yesterday.
Bosch flew back to Santo Do-
mingo on Saturday after two years
in exile in Puerto Rico. He imme-
diately demanded that the United
States pay a billion dollars in com-
pensation to the Dominican Re-
public for intervening in the re-
volt last April.
He encouraged the Dominican
people to employ strikes and oth-
er pressures to force foreign troops
from the country.
His bitterly critical attitude to-
ward the United States, which had
allowed him exile in Puerto Rico,
and physically might have pre-
vented his return to the Domini-
can Republic, evidently caused
some to wonder whether the John-

son administration is defeating its
own purposes in the Caribbean is-
land country by returning Bosch.
Bosch was elected president of
the Dominican Republic Decem-
ber 20, 1962, in the first free elec-
tions in 38 years.
He was overthrown in Septem-
ber 1963 by a coup engineered by
army officers. He fled to Ameri-
can protection in Puerti Rico and
remained there during succeeding
political upheavals in his home-
land. These were climaxed by the
ouster of the regime headed by
businessman Donald Reid Cabral
in April.
State Department officials said
the attacks on the United States
made by Bosch as soon as he got
back to the Dominican Republic
came as no surprise.
Bosch was very critical of U.S.
policy while still in Puerto Rico.
He criticized U.S. military inter-
vention and denied that the Com-
munist elements were taking over
the April revolution which had

been started by persons professing
loyalty to him.
Undersecretary of State George
W. Ball said in a television in-
terview Sunday that Bosch had
not returned to his home in a
U.S. government provided plane.
Officials said that he flew back
in a civilian plane chartered from
a private airline.
"We never interposed any ob-
jection at all to his going back,"
Ball said. "It's always been a mat-
ter of his choice."
Other officials said that to have
tried to prevent Bosch's return
would have made a martyr of him.
During the Dominican crisis,
Bosch was consulted by represen-
tatives of the Johnson administra-
tion, including McGeorge Bundy
of the White House staff.
Bosch is a writer by profession.
Some U.S. experts have been cri-
tical of Bosch's actions during the
brief period he was in power, on
the ground that he was an inept
political leader.

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SPECIAL VALUES
WOOL SUITS

2299

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GREA
PLAIDS
FLANNE
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world News Roundup

AT SELECTIONS!
H, HERRINGBONES,
ELS, HEATHERS..
IZES 6 to 16.

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WASHINGTON - The S t a t e
Department called the execution
of two captured Americans by the
Viet .Cong a "brutal murder" and
accused Communist North Viet
Nam of violation of the 1949 Ge-
neva convention.
The two Americans, identified
as Capt. Humbert R. Versace of

condemn these brutal
Viet Cong and their
Hanoi," he said.
* * *

acts by the
masters in

CAIRO - A British mission has
failed to relax strained relations
between the United Arab Republic
and England.
President Gamal Abdel Nasser

The British minister did succeed
in signing a cultural agreement
with the Egyptians. He was the
first British foreign official to
visit the U.A.R. since the 1956
Suez War.
* * *
HAVANA -- President Osvaldo
Dorticos says Cuban universities

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