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September 24, 1965 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-24

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PAGE SEVEN

FRIDAY; 8EPTEAIBER 24, 1965

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 24, 1965 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

.s,...,. ...

California's Top Two

Arfo ns Attempts Speed Record

LLOYD GRAFF

the' Real Story
Of Mario Savio and FSM
From impeachable sources now hidding in a Northern California
wine cellar trying to glue their draft cards back together, we get this
fascinating story on the essential reasons for the Berkeley insurrec-
tion' of la'st spring.
Basically it's the story of a frustrated football player named
Mario Savio:
Savio came to Berkeley heralded as the greatest halfback ever
to tote a pigskin. He had the speed, agility, and power to be another
Jim Thorpe.
But alas, Savio had a flaw that the recruiters had not even con-
sidered when they enviously watched his shiftiness on the gridiron.
He had long hair.
As a freshman, the coaches watched him closely, as he overcame
the varsity 'in every scrimmage. They welled with anticipation when
they saw him dance with ease around every tackler. Savio was a sure
All-American if there ever was one.
But his hair.
Every other football player got a good common crew cut, but
not Savio. No, he had to grow his wavy, wiry strands almost down
to his shoulders. Who does he think he is, Ben Gurion, the
worried coaches whispered to each other.
Savio's hair kept growing; the coaches' tension reached ulcerous
proportions. "Is this Savio kid some kind of beatnik or agitator or
something," they wondered.
What s the Problem, Boy?
Finally one of them approached the brash young phenom to find
out what was wrong with him.
"What's the matter kid, your girl givin' you trouble or some-
thing?"
Mario of the flowing tresses was incensed. He regarded his
hair like Dietrich regards her legs, or Joan Sutherland her larynx.
"So you don't like my hair, is that it? Then go find some well
barbered kook and run him at halfback, coach baby. I'm now on
strike'."
And with that the arrogant young, Savio stalked away and
thought of nothing but revenge. And then suddenly it hit him, like a
280 pound tackle, it hit him.
"I'll start an anti-team, a team that will rise up and take over
the football field and make California once again a national power.
With the studentsbehind me I can build a great new team, a team
built on blood, spirit, and guts, not training tables, movies, and whirl-
pool baths.".
f ,And so Mario of the growing mane had the embryonic notion
of the now famous FSM, Flowing Strands Movement.
His success was not immediate. One doesn't overcome a football
team, as entrenched as the Golden Bears in a day, but he kept plug-
ging.
And without Savio the team kept losing.
Now the Climax.
Finally the climactic moment came. Ma-rio Savio led a band of
800 fully padded and helmeted demonstrators into the football stad-
ium 'in history's first quarterback sneak-in. All night the brave group
sang fight songs going up and down the roster from "Buckle Down
Winsocki, Buckle Down," to "On Wisconsin." Joan Baez playing the
tuba, led the group in fearless song.
In desperation the football coach called in the police, really the
San Francisco 49ers in disguise. Leader Savio rolled up his pant legs
4 and addressed his throng.
"We believe in nonviolence. We believe in the single wing
offense. We believe in never running up the center. We believe in
the sensational play. And in the end we will win. Halleluyah. Rah.
Rah. And Amen, teammates."
And then the 49ers carried away the demonstrators.
But the football coach was on the defensive. He considered re-
signing, but the powerful alumni said he had to stay and restore
order. One of the assistant coaches was fired as a scapegoat.
And then the final straw. Some of the crew cutted football
players let their sideburns grow, refused to shave, listened to
Bob Dylan and joined the FSM. Savio of the long long locks had
won.
The football coach tried to patch up the mess. He' even hired a
popular assistant from a Big Ten University to polish his image. But
California football had inalterably changed.
The long hairs had done their part.
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B3NNEVILLE SALT FLATS,
Utah ()-Walt Arfons said yes-
terday he would give his rocket-
powered car a few more wind-
tunnel tests on the Bonneville Salt
Flats before trying to crack the
sound barrier.
"We'll crack the sound barrier,"
he said, "but we need to work
things out to make sure everything
is all right.
"This is all new, you know, this
rocket thing. You can't give this
car wind tunnel tests like an air-
plane.
"These runs are our wind tun-
nel tests.
"We'll break the barrier (725
miles per hour at the Salt Flats'
altitude) all right, but not until
the week of the 17th of October
unless something extraordinary
happens.
His bullet-shaped car has 15 sol-
id-fuel rockets, each with 1000
pounds of thrust. These are rock-
ets used for take-off assist in
some military and civilian air-
planes.
If Arfons does not break the
sound barrier he hopes to at least
break the world land speed rec-
ord of 536.17 °m.p.h. set on these
Western Utah Flats last year by
his brother Art.

Art also plans to be on the
Flats next week with his jet-en-
gine powered car.
* *. *
Nicklaus Trails
SEATTLE, Wash. O(f) - Jack
Nicklaus, golf's top money win-
ner of the year, trailed the three
pacesetters of the Seattle Open
after the first round with 3 un-
der score of 69.
Leading the field were three rel-
atively unknown members of the
pro tour, Bob McCallister, Charles
Coody, and Gary Bauer, who fired
first round 68's.
Nicklaus, who won this tourna-
ment in '62, took the Portland
Open last week to move into the
top money spot.

FOLK DANCES
Danced & Taught
-Begining & Intermediate Dances
FRIDAYS 8-11 P.M.
Barbour Gymnasium
Advanced Dancing
MONDAYS 8:30-10:30 -P.M.
Women's Athletic Building
Equipment for Intramural Sports
Baseball Shoes-Bats-Bolls

Footballs-Football

Shoes

Basketballs-VolleybalIs

rlulj
:1S Llf,

STEIN

SocCerba lIs k
& GOETZ Sporting Goods
3 5 So. Main St.-Downtown
662-5001

WHEN MICHIGAN AND CALIFORNIA meet in Ann Arbor Sat-
urday, former University Vice-President in charge of academic
affairs Roger Heyns (right) will be against the Wolverines for
the first time in 15 years. Heyns replaced former Chancellor Ed-
ward Strong this past summer after the Berkeley demonstrations.
Head Football Coach Ray Willsey (left) is also a relative new-
comer to the California campus. In his second year as head coach
of the Golden Bears, Willsey suffered through a 3-7 record last
fall, and come into Ann Arbor with an 0-1 mark, losing their first
game 48-6 to Notre Dame. Michigan holds the lead in the two
game series between the Wolverines and California, with a 41-0
victory in 1940, and the 14-6 win in the 1951 Rose Bowl. Willsey
played his college ball for the Golden Bears, earning two letters as
a quarterback, graduating in 1953.

11

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