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September 22, 1965 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-22

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LACE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22,196 5

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY. SEPTEMBER ~2. 19a5

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AP

Humbled

California

Seeks

Comeback

Against

00

By BOB McFARLAND
What kind of performance can
the Wolverines expect from an
opponent that looked so terrible
in last Saturday's game that their
coach felt it necessary to make a.
public apology to the student body
for the way his players looked on
the playing field?
The answer to this question will
be provided Saturday as Michigan
faces the Golden Bears of Cali-
fornia, looking more callow than
golden after the 48-6 drubbing
they suffered at the hands oz
number-one ranked Notre Dame.
Inexperienced Team
Cal's coach, Ray Willsey, had
no compliments for his young and
inexperienced squad when the
devastating contest was finally
over. The California mentor, in
his second year as head of the
Golden Bears, described the action
as "chaos."'
When asked Saturday whether
his team would be able to bounce
back against the Wolverines this
week, Willsey replied, "We'll have
to do more than bounce back
against them. We'll have to
bounce up as well."
Michigan freshman coach Dan-
ny Fitzgerald, who scouted the
game Saturday for the Wolverines,

called California "a team in tran-
sition." As Fitzgerald explained,
"Willsey was a new coach last
year, and it was necessary for
him to continue with the offen-
sive style which had been develop-
ed for the talented California
quarterback, Craig Morton. With
Morton graduating last year, Will-
sey has switched to the type of

attack which he favors, an at-
tack centered basically around a
ground game."
14 Sophs
As an indication of the wide
effects of the changes made this
year by the Golden Bears with
the switch to emphasis on run-
ning, 14 of the 22 starters on the
offensive and defensive teams are
ei'her sophomores or are new to
their position.
Seven of the eight men who are
slated to see action in the offen-
sive backfield are also novices in
their slots.
Fitzgerald feels that the tat-
tered Bears will provide on ade-
quate test for the Wolverines.
"They are still trying to find
themselves, but California will im-
prove rapidly with each game," he
added.
"Last week's defeat was a big
blow to their pride," the freshman
coach continued. "The Wolverines
will have to play twice as well as
Notre Dame. did if they are going
to come anywhere near duplicat-
ing the point total."
Costly Fumbles
The Golden Bears contributed
to their own downfall last week
by making several early miscues.
Notre Dame recovered fumbles on
the California 25-yard line and

the 12-yard line, quickly turning
the errors into touchdowns.
Then Cal failed to cover a punt
adequately and the Fighting Irisn
had a third touchdown. Last year,
the Bears were third in the nation
in punt return coverage, allowing
the opposition, just 4.2 yards Per
return, but inexperience has hurt
in this department, too.

Suddenly on the short end of a closer: perhaps more like 21-6."
21-0 score, California Was forced he commented.
to go to the air. As their aerials According to scout Denny Fitz-
went astray, the rout was only gerald, Cal's motto this year is
made worse. "root hog or die." Intended as a
Speaking of the game, Bob capsule description of their offen-
r s sive strategy, it refers to their in-
Steiner, Californa's sports infor- tention of digging in on the
mation director, noted that the of- ground. Running from the slot-T
fensive key for the Golden Bears foratin igo the odnBast-
is rshig. Whe wewer pu information, the Golden Bears at-
is rushing. "When we were put in tempt to grind out their yardage
the position where we had to pass, with the emphasis on ball control.
the breaks continued to go against Dan Berry and Jim Hunt are
us," he said. alternating at the quarterback
Bad Breaks slot. Berry, a southpaw, and Hunt,
Steiner believed the score did who throws right-handed, are both
not accurately portray the differ- strong runners. Both field gen-
ences between the two squads. erals are roll-out passers, provid-
"With an initial break in Cali- ing them the option of running
fornia's favor instead of the other or executing a pitchout. Berry is
way around, the game-would have also the Bears' punter, averaging
been much more interesting. I'm 43 yards per kick last week.
not saying we would have won, but Tough Wingback
the score would have been much Cal's chief offensive threat is

Tom Relles, a senior who plays
wingback. Fitzgerald described
Relles as "a good tough runner,
not fast, but with quick lateral
motion." Relles gained 519 yards
rushing last season on what was
primarly a passing team, in addi-
tion to hauling in 30 passes.
Fitzgerald named Steve Radich
as the outstanding defensive back
for the Bears in their encounter
with Notre Dame. Radich, a sen-
ior, is a hard-hitting defensive
end. Ken Moulton, a defensive
halfback, is another standout
among the Golden Bear defenders.
Hefty Linemen
Although California is lacking
in many areas, they still have

managed to field one of the heav-
iest teams in the nation. The
beefy offensive line averages 226
pounds per man, anchored by a
240-pound tackle. Roger Foster.
The defensive line follows close
behind, averaging 221 pounds per
man.
Cal's preference for the ground
game may be to Michigan's ad-
vantage. Against North Carolina
last week, the Wolverines held the
Tar Heels to 91 yards iushing.
The Golden Bears also will en-
able the Wolverines to become ac-
customed to the slot-T formation,
which is very similar to the offen-
sive set-up employed by Georgia,
next on the Michigan schedule.

IF

WANTED!
FIFTY
MEN

RAY WILLSEY

DAN BERRY

MEETING
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