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September 18, 1965 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-18

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PAGE SIR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, SEFT Eft 18. 19615

PAGE SIX THE MiCHIGAN DAILY SATITRnAV PTFL.R!R II 1OEl~

A-%JAWJLFCMJL * 7&OA XA;IXM"&:,AV AO, IUKRO

International Conference Study Conclaves
Analyze Problems of Vietnamese Crisis

(Continued from Page 1)
Prof. Edwin T. Dahlberg of the
C r o z i e r Theological Seminary,
represented the second group
studying the problem of Viet Nam
from the "Perspective of the study
of social change and economic de-
velopment."
In order to incorporate a cease-
fire in Viet Nam, it is first neces-
sary that the internal political,
social and economic problems be
settled by the South Vietnamese
people themselves, he said.
"If the United States continues
to respond to social revolutions in
Africa, Asia and Latin America
as it has in Viet Nam, it will be

forced to establish colonial head-
quarters all over the world. Viet
Nam has been at least the basis
for causing re-examination of the
U.S. foreign policy," Dahlberg
said.
Conflict Resolution
The third study group devoted
itself to the problem of Viet Nam
from the "Perspective of the
study of conflict and conflict
resolution."
"We live in an age that breeds
conflicts; racial, religious and
economic," Prof. Martin Deutsch
of Columbia University said. The
position of mankind in the world
today has brought about these
conflicts, the group agreed.

"KNOW THOU, of a truth, these great oppressions that have befallen
the world are preparing it for the advent of the Most Great Justice.
. . . The light of men is Justice. . . . The purpose of justice is the
appearance of unity among men. No radiance can compare with that
of justice. The organization of the world and the tranquility of man-
kind depend upon it." Baha'u'llah (1817-1892)
LECTURE: BLUEPRINTS FOR PEACE j
by IRVIN THOMAS, Chairman Detroit Bho'i Community
Sunday, Sept. 19, 3 P.M.-YM-YWCA

To end the religious conflict
between Buddhists and Catholics
in South Viet Nam, the group
proposed making the clergy of
each group known to the people
and a united clergy to increase
the moral committment of the
p e o p I e in non - governmental
groups. The group also encouraged
the development of moral witness-
es to support "Peace Pilgrims"
who would travel through North
Viet Nam and try to "stir the
conscience of the world."
The fourth study group con-
cerned with the problem of Viet
Nam from the "Perspective of the
study of revolutionary warfare"
was represented by Prof. Eqbal
Ahmad of the School of Industrial
and Labor Relations, Cornell Uni-
versity and J e a n Lacouture,
French journalist and specialist
on Viet Nam.
Guerrilla Warfare
Ahmad led a discussion on the
problem of guerrilla warfare. "It
is the latest and newest weapon
in the United States and its test-
ing ground is Viet Nam," he said.
Jean Lacouture, speaking in
French, stressed that a political
solution for Viet Nam should not
be based on negotiations between
the "great powers" such as the
United States and Hanoi, but by
the "Vietnamese of the South."
Negotiations demand inclusion of
the National Liberation Front in
its own right as a principal party
to the conflict in South Viet Nam.
Eventually, the report contin-
ued, "provisional good neighborly
relations between the North and
South would be established and
lead to the unification of all of
Viet Nam.
Reference was made to the pos-
sibility of a "new Geneva" where-
by a guarantee of neutrality
would be set up for Viet Nam

possibly linking it to Laos and
Cambodia.
Key Addresses
The committee reports were fol-
lowed by addresses by Prof. Ernst
Winter, director of the Diplomatic
Academy in Vienna; Prof. Mo-
hammad Lahbabi, former minister
of economic affairs in Morocco;
Dahlberg, and Bob Parris, field
secretary of the Student Non-
violent Coordinating Committee.

A cross
Campus
SATURDAY, SEPT. 18
11 a.m.-Action workshops for
the Viet Nam conference to de-
cide what action might be taken
in Viet Nam will be held in the
auditorium complex of Angell Hall.
11 a.m. - International Confer-
ence on Alternative Perspectives
on Viet Nam Workships will be
held. Location to be announced.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present "Cyrano de Bergerac"
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-The Kingston Trio will
appear at Hill Auditorium.
8:30 p.m.-The Dramatic Arts
Center will present "Concert for
Ann Arbor," experimental dance
from the New York Theatre Rally,
on the top level of the Maynard
Street Parking Structure.

"Viet Nam is well suited
first in an experiment in
dependence," Winter said.

'NEW LOOK' BARREN:
Visitors Uncover Contrasts
In Russia's Changing Capital

to be
inter-

By The Associated Press
MOSCOW-Moscow is a spraw-
ling city, drab yet imposing.
The Soviet capital embodies
Communism's mood and problems.
It has utilitarian, no-frills look,
that lays out before the visitor
this state's triumphs and failures.
Contrasts
"It's the contrasts that puzzle
me," says an American student.
"They put up the sputnik and
carry out fantastic heart opera-
tions, but the merchandise in the
stores-well, the Salvation Army
couldn't give it away back home."
Moscow, shunning display and
elegance, does not shine and glit-
ter like the great cities of the
West. Buildings present stern fa-
cades of dull-colored brick, plas-

ter often discolored and peeling, still serve as a reminder of a
thick walls instead of open ex- grim and pompous era.
pansesof plate glass. On the side streets remain thou-
An American doctor said: sands of the log and clapboard
"I guess we look too much for one- and two-story houses of the
the superficial things. These peo- old Moscow. Many are unpainted,
ple eat, they get along. sagging.
"But when I go by a hospital Provincial
and see the lone bare bulb in the They face on quiet dirt court-
waiting room, my heart sinks." yards, with benches and wooden
Construction tables for outdoor summer eat-
Heavy trucks rumble along the; ing. Laundry hangs from make-
broad Moscow streets, loaded with shift lines. Old women sit gos-
steel girders, cement wall sec- 'siping. Children play among the
tions, the materials for the big low trees, the bushes and flowers.
construction projects. The smell The Soviet administration neg-
of their cheap fuel hangs in the lects the maintenance of these
air. houses. It replaces them as fast
The new Soviet architectural as possible by 10- and 12-story
style is bare, functional. Gone are apartment buildings, symbols of
the days of the "Stalin gothic" the industrialized society exalted
ministries and hotels, though these by Communism.

4
*
4
4

Viet Nam should be set up as
a "conflict-free zone" headed by
botha Communist and a free-
world leader, he explained.
Greater Objectivity
"This set-up would lend greater
objectivity to domestic and for-
eign issues," Winter explained. It
would allow for a mixed economy
- the combination of socialism
and free enterprise most likely to
be successful.
Lahbabi stressed the social and
economic development needed in
Viet Nam. He said there are "no
bourgeoise with enterprising spir-
its" in Viet Nam. Therefore, he
advocated the establishment of a
socialist state.
Dahlberg dealt with "the sense
of deep trouble we feel as religious
persons." Dahlberg was a member
of the recent interfaith peace
mission to Viet Nam. "The new
generation is "cradled and nu-
tured in the ways of violence and
death," he said.
Dahlberg s a i d Communism
should be resisted - but not by
military power. "We should not
kill the enemy but abolish the
enmity." He also remarked on the
fallacy of trying to compensate
for bombing with economic aid.

V

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DAI.LY OFFICIAL BULLETIN~ . .
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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TV Phi.W RITI'EN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 18
Day Calendar
Cinema Guild-"Cyrano de Bergerac":

Architecture Aud , 7 and 9 p.m.
International Conference on Alterna-
tive Perspectives on Viet Nam oWrk-
shops-Location to be announced, 11
a.m.
General Notices
Engineering Placement Meeting: "En-
gineering Opportunities." Discussion
of opportunities for current engineer-
ing graduates, demands, salaries, etc.
Primarily for seniors and graduate stu-
dents, but open to all interested. Prof.
J. G. Young, Sept. 20, 4 p.m., 311 W.
Engrg. Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for Delmar Hur-
ley Robbins, Engineering Mechanics;
thesis: "The Contact of Certain Elas-

has
PART-TIME SALES POSITIONS
for Men and Women
CONTACT MISS GALLO

l

cci)QAF roc) CUakcH

11

ON

7(i-IE

A 3r -X\fl

If you are concerned about university problems in
the areas of academic reform, student economic
welfare, housing, discrimination, etc.
JOIN SGC COMMITTEES
For information please contact SGC Personnel Director
or SGC Administrative Vice President

tic Shells with Rigid Flat Surfaces,"
Sat., Sept. 18, 243 W. Engrg. Bldg., at
9 a.m. Chairman, S. K. Clark.
Summary of Action Taken by Student
Government Council at Its Meeting,
September 17, 1965
Approved: That Student Government
Council ask that Joint Judiciary Coun-
cil hear charges against the Michigan
chapter of SNCC for an illegally post-
ed sign in the Fishbowl brought by Al-
pha Phi Omega.
Approved: That SGC appropriate an
additional $150 to finance the opera-
tions of the committee on the Univer-
sity Bookstore.
Approved: That SGC supports the
stand taken by th~e University admin-
istration in its recent defense of free
speech. The stand reads as follows:
That SNCC was technically In viola-
tion of a regulation concerning the
utilization of the Fishbowl.
That SNCC has been informed that it
may avoid further violation by present-
ing a proper request for the broaden-
ing of its activity to include Viet Nam
protest activity.
That the Office of Student Affairs
considers the sign to be in poor taste,
highly subjective in its content and
inconsistent with the stated objectives
of the present International Conference
on Alternative Perspectives on Viet
Nam.
Approved: That the date for elec-
tion of members at large shall be set
during the 12th week of school during
the Fall and Spring terms.
The term of office of members not
re-elected shall end two regular meet-
ings after new members are, seated.
And that members elected for the first
time shall sit on Council without vote
for the two regular meetings cited
above.
Approved: That SGC grant Home-
coming 1965 a 2:30 late permission on
Saturday evening, Oct. 16 and a 1:30
late permission on Friday evening, Oct.
15.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Cameron Dress Co., Inc., Harrisburg,
Pa.-Jr. Engr. for clothing mfr. Re-
cent grad, bkgd. In methods, prod.
scheduling, cost, ets.
Radio WSOO, Sault Ste Marie, Mich.
-News man for local news coverage.
Immed. opening.
Unidynamics, St. Louis, Mo.-Design
Engineers, knowl. of marine engrg. or
naval arch. for mfr. handling gov't.
defense work.
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Md.-Vari-
ous openings including Indust., In-
strum., Mech., General, Civil & Elec-
tronics Engineers. Also Chemists, sta-
tistician, & librarian. Test artillery
weapons, munitions, auto. vehicles, etc.

Mgmt. Consultants, Chicago-Ass't.
to General Manager. Degree in engrg.,
MBA desirable. Assist with general ad-
min., planning & hiring key person-
nel. May lead to top mgmt. with mid-
ovestern mfr. of stationary capital equip-
ment.
U.S. Navy, Lorain, Ohio-Supply Data
Specialist with Supervisor of Ship-
building. 3 yrs. exper. in admin., inves-
tigation, etc. Knowl. of mgmt. systems,
methods, etc.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Ule of This Column for Announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered student organiza-
tions only. Organizations who are plan-
ning to be active for the fall term
must be registered in the Office of
Student Organizations by Sept. 17, 1965.
Forms are available in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Bahai Student Group, Lecture: "Blue-
prints for Peace" by Ervin Thomas,
Sun., Sept. 19, 3 p.m., YM-YWCA.
* * *
Gamma Delta, Regular meeting Sun.,
Sept. 19, 6 p.m., Prof. Korthals, for-
merly of the Air Force Academy, will
speak on "Science and Christianity,"
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511 Wash-
tenaw.
Lutheran Student Center and Chap-
el, Worship services: Sunday 9:30 and
11 a.m.; 7 p.m., Speaker, Dr. Richard
Cutler, vice-president of student af-
fairs. Topic: "The University's Concern
for its Students," Hill St. and Forest
Ave.
University Lutheran Chapel, Regular
Sunday service, Sun., Sept. 19, 9:45 and
11:15 a.m., 1511 Washtenaw.
University of Michigan Student Em-
ployes Union (UMSEU), General mem-
bership meeting, Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m.,
Michigan Union, Room 3K. Discussion
or KYU Day,.housing, bookstore, fu-
ture activities and goals. Nominations
for election of executive committee.
All members and interested people in-
vited.
* * *
Unitarian Student Group, Discussion
of Robinson's book "Honest to God,"
Sept. 19, 7:30 p.m., Unitarian Chapel,
Rides, 7:15 p.m., Union and Markley.

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPISCOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
306 N. Division-Phone 665-0606
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
(Breakfast at Canterbury House after 9:00
service).
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer
7:00 p.m.--Evening Prayer (Chapel).
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion (Breakfast at
Canterbury House following service).
FRIDAY
12:10-Holy Communion.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Wastenaw Ave.
For transportation call 662-4018
9:30 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 20 years of age
11:00 a.m.-SurJay morning church service
Infant care curing service.
11:00 a.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty, open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper, David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
,Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:35 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of month.
Nursery facil'ties during worship services and
church school.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 .m. "The Love
That Lasts" Rev. Terry N. Smith
Church School: 9:30 a.m., crib-9th grade
11:15 a.m., crib-6th grade
Student Guild: 802 Monroe, telephone 2-5189
BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Rev. E. R. Klaudt, Rev. A. C. Bizer,
& Rev. A. G Habermehl, Pastors
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Service
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School

UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletcher
Pastors: Malefyt and Van Hoven
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m.-Collegiate Discussion Group with
Dr. Kenneth Pike will continue the study of
I 'Peter
10:30 a.m.-Morning Worship. "Teach-in and
the Teacher" Rev. Van Haven
5:45 p.m.-The Supper Seminar at the Col-
legiate Club with Dr. Duncan Salls speak-
ing on "The Playboy Philosophy"
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship and Discussion
with Mrs. Sidney Mohr, Director of Faith
at Work in Alabama
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
G. Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH &
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and .11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "Trustees of the Secrets of God."
7:00 p.m.-Worship and Program, Wesley
Lounge. Rev. Robert Willouahby, "Viet
Nom-A Christian Perspective."
TUESDAY
12 :00 noon-Luncheon Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "Communist Faith-Christian Faith."
Out in time for 1 :00 classes.
8:30 p.m.-Open House, Charles Bearden's
Wesley Foundation apartment.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Sup-
per and program. "Dialogue Between
Protestant and Catholic on Campus,"
Father Torrence, S.J.
THURSDAY
12:00 noon-Luncheon Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "Basic Themes in the Bible."
Lunch 25c. Out in time for 1:00 p.m.
classes
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-YOUNG MARRIEDS, Pine Room.
Dinner. Program follows in Wesley Lounge
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore L. Scheidt, Assistant

I

1542 SAB

663-0533

STUDENT GOVERNMENT COUNCIL

4

41

i

r,

I

SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 & 12:00
Presbvterian Campus Center located
Church.

at the

BRING IT BY 10 A.M.,--WEAR. IT TONIGHT!

gi

CAMPUS CHAPEL
Forest at Washtenaw
The Rev. Donald Postema
Sponsored by the Christtian Reformed Churches
of Michigan.
Morning Worship 10:00 a.m.
Sermon, "Cutting Up on Campus"
Coffee Hour 11:00 a.m.
Supper at 6:00 p.m.
Communion service at 7:00 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
Msgr. Bradley, Rev. Litko, Rev. Ennen
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:45,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00,
9:00 and 12:00 and 5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. - Evening Mass.
Confessions following
SATURDAY-Confessions: 3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
& FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 & 512 E. Huron 663-9376
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m. Campus Discussion Class. "The
Secular City" chapter one
11:00 a.m. Worship-First Baptist Church
7:00 p.m. Social Pain: Can We Take It? Dr.
Merrill Jackson, Center For Research on
Conflict Resolution. -
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m. Midweek worship and study classes
Paul Light, Baptist Campus Minister
James H. Middleton, Baptist Church
Minister

Q, ':? ^
Q' "':,
'v
Ate:
.. .

Often you need a particular garment in a hurry. At
Greene's, there's no problem ... Bring it to us by 10
a.m. and at your request, we'll have it ready to wear
that evening.
Greene's have always stressed quality and .care, but
occasionally, we like to remind you-if it's service
you want--Greene's has that too!
In a hurry, or on regular 3-day service, you can be
sure that at Greene's, you can get the best in dry
cleaning quality and service.

*r+~.
" :v:

Sunday at 9:45 and at 11:15: Services.
mon by the Pastor, "Ethics and
Christian." (Holy Communion in
services)

Ser-
The
both

Sunday at 11:15 Bible Study of II Corinthians
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stu-
dent Organization, Supper and Program.
Guest Speoker: Prof. Richard Korthols,
Former head Astronomical Dept., Air Force
Academy. Topic: "Science and Christian-
ity."
Monday at 8:00 p.m.: Meeting of Pastor's
Class "A Survey of Christian Theology"
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m. Midweek Devo-
tion
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill Street at South Forest Ave.
Pastor: Henry O. Yoder
SUNDAY
9:30 & 11:00 a.m. Worship Services
7:00 p.m. "The University's Concern for its
Students"-Dr. Richard Cutler, Vice-Pres-
ident of the Office of Student Affairs
TUESDAY

I

FREE CITY-WIDE DELIVERY SERVICE

I

SEVENTH DAY ADVENTIST
CHURCH
meeting temporarily of 1131 Church St.
Pastor T. J. Rasmussen

5 CONVENIENT LOCATIONS

west side
3033 Packard
663-133A

east side
3033 Packard
663-1336

campus
1213 S. University
663-3016

main plant
516 E. Liberty
662-3231

Ypsilanti
40 E. Michigan
482-5371

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I I

,{ q.VJ°- I. 'V J°1 J V.V IVV'. v * . vv _II

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