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September 17, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 17,1966'

PAGE STX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

F .rIDA.. . y ...,.........wSPM ER1. 15165

w

DIIHG
OUT

..

TOTHIGHT

-2

7le VIRGINI/IN
RESTAURANT

Most head for California and New York
North America 1'5'1
Immigrants admitted
40.5% to the United States
July 1, 1960-1964.
South America RATIO OF FEMALES TO
7.5% -
MAIN OCCUPATIONS (OF THOSE EMPLOYED)

Europe
43%

ROAST
YOUNG

TOM TURKEY

Served with sage dressing, whipped potatoes,165
tossed green salad, roll and butter,
coffee, tea, or milk ...................

7 A.M.-8 P.M. Daily

Closed Tuesdays

Residents of
Watts Begin
To Rebuild
Negro Workers Get
New Jobs by Helping
To Haul Away Debris
LOS ANGELES (A)-A month
after the riots, Watts reaps a
small reward from its self-de-
struction.
Negro laborers have employ-
ment cleaning up the rubble.
Dump trucks, shovels and strong
backs toil amid blackened skele-
tons of supermarkets and twist-
ed clumps of small businesses.
In one block of East 103rd St.
a touring newsman estimates 40
business establiohments have been
destroyed. The piles of debris
blend so an accurate count is im-
possible.
Blood Brothers
A youth with a hatchet chips
crusted cement from bricks. Stack-
ed neatly in piles - one labeled
"bluod brothers working here."
They '11 becoaxe the used-brick trim
so attractive on suburban tract
homes.
"Iot work." says the bare-chest-
ed youth, .sweating in a hot sun.
How much does he earn? "A dollar
thirty-five an hour."
Hauls Debris
A handsome young man with a
rickety truck has his own busi-
ness-"mostly haulin'" He loads
the truck with acetylene-severed
lengths of sewer pipe. "That's
right. We'll sell it for junk."
For five days starting Aug. 11
an orgy of pillaging, gunfire, fire-
bombing and looting raged in a
broad Negrc area on Los Angeles'
South Side. Thirty-six persons
died, $45 million worth of private
property was destroyed.
Federal Report
A preliminary federal report has
blamed, among other things, mid-
summer heat, hostility toward po-
lice, high unemployment, large
numbers of poor Negroes arriving
from the rural South, poor living
conditions and out - of - school
youngsters wanting excitement.
Official probes swing into high
gear this week. The coroner is
holding inquests. A governor's
commission starts hearings.
Many Watts businessmen await
government help to put them on
their feet.

Hatcher Emphasizes
Role of Universities

Old Ieidelberg
211-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 11 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays

I ---------- I

The underdeveloped countries of
the world expect their universities
to help them close the economicI
and cultural gaps between their
own nations and the more de-
veloped ones, University President
Harlan Hatcher commented yes-
terday.
Hatcher recently returned to the
United States from Tokyo, where
he was head of the American dele-
gation at the conference of the
International Association of Uni-
versities.

most attention from the delegate 4
were those of access to higher edu-
cation and the contribution of
higher education to economic de-
velopment, Hatcher said.
Hatcher said that educators at
the international conference were
in virtually unanimous agreement
that "universities are responsible
for managing their own affairs in
academic and research matters."
The educators believe that such
autonomy includes independence
from dictation by government,
private organizations, and stu-
dents.

*

The topics

which received the

dV
0R

20.7%
Clerical
and
Sales

19.2%
Professional
and Technical

13,3%
Craftsmen
and
Foremen

11%
Laborers

10.3%
Machine
Operators

7%
Farm

18.5%
Others

It's here n aa va mthe new,
Honeywell Pentax
Spotmatic.1$28950
A milestone in 35mm single-
lens reflex photography-that's-Q *
the trim new Honeywell Pentax
Spotmatic camera with through-
the-lens CdS exposure system.
The new Spotmatic's expo-
sure system is uncannily accu-
rate. It sees exactly what the
lens sees, regardless of lens focal length or the use of filters,
extension tubes, or a bellows unit. Even under the trickiestlighting
conditions, your Spotmatic will assure you of perfect exposures,
picture after picture.
It's easy to use, too. Settings can be changed without removing
the Spotmatic from your eye. You'll capture the fastest action ...
the most fleeting expressions. You'll get the pictures others miss!
Lightweight and compact, the new Honeywell Pentax Spotmatic
has an amazingly sharp Super-Takumar 50mm f/1.4 lens with fully
automatic diaphragm;'shutter speeds to 1/1000 sec.; built-in self-
timer, and many more quality features. Priced at just $299.50, the
new Spotmatic is the best camera value in the world. Come in for
a demonstration soon!
,~d'MCCAMERA SHOP
Ann Arbor's Only Exclusive Camera Shop
1115 S. UNIVERSITY 665-6101

E

0

New Immigration Law
To Alter Admission Basis

r

THE PIN. ROOM
ICOLONIAL LANES
1950S. INDUSTRIAL HIGHWAY
662-3808

I

By The Associated Press
At flood tide, in the decade
1900-1910, immigrants came to
the United States at the rate of
880,000 a year. Now the figure is
about 300,000 annually.
With the full support of Presi-
dent Johnson, Congress is about
to pass a new immigration law,
the first major change in some 40
years. It will change the basis for
admission to this country, but will
not substantially change the num-
ber.

Where do immigrants come Under the new immigration law,
from these days? Europe is still the system of national origin

JUMBO COCKTAILS,
CHARCOAL BROILED
STEAKS, CHOPS, AND
SEA FOOD

iI

J

L.

DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.
NEW CAR DEALER
Triumph-Volvo-
Fiot-Checker
We lease cars
as low as $4.50
per 24-hr. day.
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART

the biggest supplier, 43 per cent
in the period July 1, 1960-64. But
North America (meaning largely
Canada and Mexico) is close be-
hind, with 40.5 per cent.
The remainder of the 1,153.615
immigrants in the four-year per-
iod came from Asia, 7.6 per cent;
South America, 7.5, and all
others, 1.4.
Three countries in Europe -
Germany, United Kingdom and
Italy - are currently supplying
one-fourth of all immigrants to
the United States, and nearly
three-fifths admitted. Numerical-
ly, Mexico and Canada supplied
more immigrants in the four-year
period than any other countries,
185,143 and 136,492 respectively.
More Women
There are more women immi-
grants than men, a ratio of about
one and one-fourth to one, and
65 per cent of all immigrants are
less than 30 years of age. A little
more than half of all new arrivals
in this country are single, only
3.5 per cent are widowed or
divorced.
About half of all immigrants
have no occupation, they are
mainly housewives, children or
students. Among those with skills,
the largest group falls in the cler-
ical and sales class, about 20.7
per cent, and professional and
technical, 19.2.
Craftsmen and foremen make
up 13.3 per cent, laborers 11, ma-
chine operators 10.3 and farmers
7. The remaining 18.5 per cent
run a wide variety of skills from
household workers to executives.
Where Do They Go?
Once here, where do immigrants
settle? Nearly half of them go to
two states, California and New
York, about 70,000 a year to the
former and 65,000 to the latter.
Next in order of preference are
Texas, Illinois, New Jersey, Flor-
ida and Massachusetts.

quotas will be abolished. Entry in
the future will be based mainly
on reuniting of separated fami-
lies, and on recruiting of skills
most useful to the nation.
As presently developing, the
legislation will limit immigration
to 170,000 annually from outside
the Western Hemisphere, with a
top limit of 20,000 from one
country.

4

UMBRELLA BACK, REVERSE
FLAP POCKETS, FULLY LINED
IN BEIGE AND LODEN

--

FALL CUDA-JACKETS

SALE
PRICE

;.
4 :U :

$ 95

l ..y

: l

4o

f

LEVI'S GALORE FOR
GALS AND GUYS up
Over 2000 Pairs in Stock
COTTON TURTLE NECK$69
"T" SHIRTS-15 Colors.........
SA-M S STORE

319 W. Huron

665-3688

RESTAURANT
3050 JACKSON ROAD
NO 5-3636

BEER-PIZZA-BANJOS
BIMBO'S

122 E. Washington

Open Mon. & Fri. Nights

i

AP

I

_..-g /L

"e

( 2 . L~6JA2I9//

"RUB RAW THE SORES OF DISCONTENT"
THE CREDO FOR ORGANIZATION OF THE POOR
Keynote Speaker of the Challenge Lecture Series:
CAN A MASS SOCIETY BE A GREAT SOCIETY?
SAUL ALINSKY
presented by

*

t

\-'M
- ......M

/ _ ,,,,/ ,/ V / v . s

0+

traces of

f ie ' tia/

lace... Miss J's

enchanting look for
romantic fall nights

01

d Wine

and

rTNIFjY 11

The line is empire with a froth
of cotton lace atop a slightly A-line

I

I

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