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September 10, 1965 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-10

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'PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 10. 1965

PAGE EIGHT THE MIChIGAN DAIlY FRTIIAV SFPTPMRFR 1EL 1!~xi

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LLOYD GRAFF
Renaissance Man
In Baseball Suit
Bert Campaneris, I salute you.
Who's Bert Campaneris, you ask. Is he the doctor who woke
up a cat's brain after it was technically dead for 203 days? No, of
course not. Is he the policeman who ticketed the mayor's car for
parking in a space designated "No Parking 2 A.M. to 5 A.M. Tues.,
Thurs. and Sat." Shucks, no. Is he the only guy in the world who
picked the Pittsburgh Pirates to win the pennant in May? Nah.
Well, who the hell is he, then, funny boy?
Bert Campaneris is Renaissance Man in a baseball suit.
Speak English, man, if you don't mind.
Bert (Campy) Campaneris played all nine positions in one
game Wednesday night for the Kansas City Athletics as they
lost to the California Angels. To top it off, Campy, playing
catcher in the ninth got whacked in the head by a baserunner
and had to go to the hospital for precautionary X-rays.E
So what. Who cares if some nutty ballplayer plays every position
in the park. All it got him was a conk on the bean, anyway,.
But don't you see the symbolism. The game was a modern al-
legory, a microcosm of life.
Look out now, the philosopher in him is leaking out. OK
Bertrand, baby, let's hear the jazz. I know it's coming.
Gradschoolitis, Etc.
Campy Campaneris defied the trend of our century. "Special-
ize, maJor, do one thing well, and chuck the rest," is the big
line of the. times. Gradschoolitus. Seventh-century Turkish
andiron makers, that's what I'll do my doctoral thesis on.
Original research.
Campy Campaneris is the generalist. Sure, he spreads himself
a bit thin. He's not as good a pitcher as he is a second baseman,
but he goes at everything with the same zest and excitement. There's
the same zing whether he's picking up a bunt or throwing a curve.
And Campeneris got smashed in the ninth. What could have
been more poetic. The eccentric, the unusual, the wild, caught it
between the eyes from a clumsy rookie baserunner. California, the
establishment, the IBMs, the specialized mass conglomeration ganged
up on him and knocked him out.
But Campy will be back. Right field, shortstop, first base, catcher,
and pitcher will all be his again. The generalist keeps bobbing up
to take charge if you just give him a chance.
Jack of all trades, but master of none? Maybe. But I'll take
it over the platoons any day. Give me the wide man. You take
the engineer who can barely scrawl his name, much less compose
a sentence.
Bert Campaneris, I salute you.
STAR MAY QUIT:
.Ralston Loses to Australian;
Ashe Pitted A ainst Emercrna
g i~UUU'. EI.E&Y7g

Juday
By HOWARD KOHN
First of the Big Ten opponents
for the defending champion Mich-
igan gridders this season will be
perennial across-state rival, the
Michigan State Spartans.
The Maize and Blue will tangle
with the Green and White of
State on Oct. 9. Last year, the
Spartans dropped a 17-10 contest
to the Wolverines en route to
posting a 3-3 won-lost mark and
a sixth-place finish in the con-
ference.
MSU of 1965, a team which head
mentor Duffy Daugherty anxious-
ly says, "cannot afford any injur-
ies because of a definite lack in
depth," will be spearheaded by a
pair of All-America prospects
quarterback Steve Juday and end
Gene Washington.
Juday,' called "one of the most
underrated quarterbacks in the
country"by his coach,. will be one
of 26 returning lettermen on the
Spartan squad. The six-foot, 178-
pound senior completed 79 passes
in 148 tries for nine touchdowns
and a net total of 894 yards in
the air as a front-line player last
year.
The Spartan signal-caller cur-
rently holds several team passing
records for a single game and is
expected to add to his collection
with the help of his favorite re-
ceiver, Washington.
A speedster on the MSU track
team, Washington snagged 35
aerials for 542 yards and five TD's
as a sophomore in '64. He stands
6-2 and tips the scales at 209
pounds.
Three of the top ground-gain-
ing stalwarts for Michigan State
are Eddie Cotton, Clinton Jones
and Bob Aspisa. State's ground
game appears less than spectacu-
lar from advance indications, but
could be sufficient to supplement
the Juday-Washington combo.

Key

to

Spartan

Hopes

Dick Gordon, who last year indi-
vidually gained almost as many
yards as the rest of the backs
combined.
His partner in the backfield
running slot will likely be the 188
pound Jones, a track star and a
junior, who will be back for his
second year as a starter. .
Bolstering the rushing charge
will be sophomore sensation BobE
Aspisa, a Hawaiian recrut who has
been tearing up the turf in prac-
tice drills.
Holding down the place-kick
and punting job for the green-
and-white crew is Dick Kenney,
another import from Hawaii.
Kenney is a unique kick specialist

in that he does his work bare- lineup again for State, along with
footed. tackles Buddy Owens and Don
Up front on the offense will be Bierwicz, and linebackers Ron
four lettermen - guards Gary Groovert and Charlie Thornhill.
Rugg and Jerry West. center
Boris Dimitroff and tackle John The seventh returnee is middle
Karpinski A pair of first-year guard Harold Lucas who packs
men, Joe Przybycki and Norman 257 pounds onto his 6-2 frame.
Jenkins have been picked to fur- Weak point in the Spartan de-
nish more sound poundage. fense is the secondary, which is
On defense, State will have as yet unproven in collegiate
seven regulars back giving a big competition. Don Japinga is the
boost to Daugherty's plans of in- only returning letterman in the
provement. defensive backfield, and the re-
Veteran ends Charlie Smith and maining positions will be filled by
Ed Macuga will be in the starting reserves from last season's squad.
-f

FRATERNITY

GRAND OPENING

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TEPs
ARE
TOPS

FREE BAG OF POPCORN
WITH ANY 1Oc OR MORE PURCHASE OF
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* ROASTED PEANUTS
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* SOFT ICE CREAM
* SHAKES AND SUNDAES
* SOFT DRINKS

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Cotton, a returning regular,- is
tabbed as the best bet to take
over the heavy-duty running
chores at fullback from departed

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410 E. Liberty (corner Thompson)
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Open every day except Tuesday, 1 :30 p.m. to 1 1 p.m.

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Ar

FOREST HILLS, N.Y. (A") -
South African Cliff Drysdale
knocked America's top player,
Dennis Ralston, into possible re-
tirement with a stirring five-set
quarter final victory yesterday
and left Arthur Ashe as the lone
U.S. hope in the National Tennis
Championships.
In a touch and go battle that
lasted 2% hours and that saw each
player blow match points, Drys-
dale upset the fuming, third-seed-
ed Ralston_2-6, 3-6, 7-5, 6-3, 8-Q.
Drysdale's most potent weapon
against the third seeded Ralston
was a backhand which he swings
like baseball's Mickey Mantle hit-
ting left handed and which is just
as devastating.
Time and again he sent thea
shot like a siege gun at Ralston's
feet and the Californian had no
defense.
Shortly a f t e r w a r d, another!
American hopeful, giant killer
Charlie Pasarell of Puerto Rico,
went down before the tricky,
change-of-pace shots of Mexico's
Rafael Osuna 1-6, 6-3, 6-3, 7-5.
Osuna broke Pasarell at love in
the 12th game of the fourth set
after the Puerto Rican had staved
off two match points in the ninth.
WELCOME
STUDENTS
Hours open
MON.-SAT.
from 8:30-5:30
U-N Barbers
near Kresge's
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Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre
DEPENDABLE
IMPORT SERVICE
We have the MECHANICS
and the PARTS.

The 24-year-old Drysdale, seed-
ed eighth, and Osuna, No. 6, meet
in one of Saturday's semi-finals
with the other bracket to be de-1
cided today.
In these matches, Roy Emerson
of Australia, top-seeded and rated
the world's best amateur, plays,
Ashe, 22-year-old Davis Cupper
from Los Angeles, and Manuel
Santana of Spain takes on An-
tonio Palafox, Osuna's partner on
Mexico's Davis Cup team.
BEER-PIZZA-BANJOS
BIMBO'S

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CHAR BROILED SIRLOIN STRIP STEAK .. . .1.40
SPAGHETTI & MEAT SAUCE.............1.10

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512 E. William

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OPEN: Fri.-Sat.-Sun. Noon to 3 A.M. (Closed Tuesday)
DeLONG'S PIT BARBECUE
314 DETROIT ST., ANN ARBOR, MICH.
CARRY-OUT ORDERS ONLY-PHONE 665-2266
FREE DELIVERY FRI.-SUN.
BARBECUE CHICKEN AND RIBS
FRIED CHICKEN SHRIMP AND FISH

OldHeidelberg
211-213 N. Main St. 668-9753
Specializing in GERMAN FOOD,
FINE BEER, WINE, LIQUOR
PARKING ON ASHLEY ST.
Hours: Daily 1 1 A.M.-2 A.M. Closed Mondays
FRONTIER BEEF BUFFET
Cafeteria Open 7 Days
Sun.-Thurs. 11:30A.M.-8:00 P.M.
Friday and Saturday until 8:30 P.M.

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CAFETERIA

dREVAIRINIUIN
RESTAURANT

Fried Chicken Seafood,
Steaks and Chops

Open Mon. thru Sat. 7 a.m.-8
Cafeteria Style 7 a.m.-5
Will Serve 5 p.m.-8

p.m.
p.m.
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Broiled Special ST RIP STE.
New York S1l.I [IT [I
Served with onion ring, garnish,
french fried potatoes, tossed garden salad,
roll and butter, hot coffee ..............

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663-9165

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"Roast Beef at its Finest"

7 A.M.-8 P.M. Daily

Closed Tuesdays

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REGISTRATION
BEGINS SEPT. 7.
DIAG
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