100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 09, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 1965

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER ~ i9Ei5

i .s+v vv.f.saa.a.}e..x i.ui .a uaraaiuiV Vl IUVU

A.

Mason Readies Offensive Line

LLOYD GRAFF

By CHUCK VETZNER
The fullback whizzed through
a huge hole in the line and Tony
Mason roared his a p p r o v a l.
"That's better. Knock more peo-
ple over."
Mason is the Wolverine offen-
sive line coach, but he also dabbles
in philosophy. He passionately be-
lieves that the key to outstanding
blocking is a desire to hit people.
The more violent the play, the bet-
terit is.
Color Bind?
The team colors are maize and
b'ue, but Mason pays special hom-
age to black and blue. The pop of
a shoulder pad to Mason is like
the Rolling Stones to a normal
teenager.
A big lineman is fine. A fast
one is even better But above all
else, he has to be w:.ling to flatten
the defensive tackle staring him in
the face.
Some of Mason's admirers think
he could turn the Rockettes into
decent linemen. This is probably
an overstatement, but chances are
the chorines would be throwing
some pretty mean forearms.
The Michigan linemen are well
aware of their coach'sviews and
they oblige him with rugged play.
No Weak Sister
Last season, for example, the
offensive wall was supposedly the
weak link on the team. Almost
every starter was inexperienced,
but 10 games and many pounds
of raw meat later, the Wolverines
were Big Ten and Rose Bowl
champions.
A big share of the credit went

to Tony Mason and his frisky pu-
pils who cleared enough holes for
the team to rank among the na-
tion's top rushing outfits.
This season, Mason once again
has a problem of inexperience,
but nobody questions the caliber
of the line. Everyone seems to
rest assured that anyone Mason
sends out will be tough enough to
get the job done.,

Mason himself has confidence in
his men, and he stresses the prob-
lem is not physical shyness.
"They've been showing much
improvement," he explains. "They
are hitting well, and the main
thing we have to work on now is
eliminating mental errors."
Two players who should be
fairly well acclimated with the in-
tricacies of the line are tackles

Tom Mack and Charlie Kines.
Both are returning starters and
Mason can take special pride in
each of them.
Kines, who at 230 pounds looks
like he just devoured a pickle
barrel, played his high school ball
under Mason. Last year as a jun-
ior, Kines became a starter with
virtually no game experience.
Gets Good Start
He thrived under his old tutor
and was credited with a big role
in stopping Illinois' Dick Butkus
or at least slowing down the fero-
cious All-American.
The other tackle is Tom Mack,
who was not only inexperienced
last season but had never played
the position until the previous
spring. But Mack also quickly
learned his trade and is now con-
sidered an All-America possibility.
Mason adds that this pair con-
stitutes "two of the finest offen-
sive tackles in the country."
Different Story
Inside of this duet, the picture is
not quite as rosy. The guards are
both lettermen but there is a
catch to it. They both earned their
awards while tackling people in-
Student Managers
Anyone interested in becom-
ing a manager for the Michigan
football team please contact
Dave Muir at 665-8721, or come
to Ferry Field any day this
week between 3 and 5 p.m.
stead of blocking them. The pair,
Don Bailey and Bill Keating, spe-
cialized in defense last year, but
Mason has high hopes for them.

FRATERNITY

As I ooze inexorably toward my 21st birthday and a Bachelors
Degree it becomes increasingly obvious that I've already crossed
the fat chasm between youth and middle age.
Clearly, it's not a wrinkle or a backache which separates the
young from old, but one's tastes, eccentricities, and whims. For in-
stance, Casey Stengel, brittle boned and shriveled at 75, is younger
than several editors of The Michigan Daily in spirit.
The sour fact that I'd edged out of youth was revealed yester-
day when I ordered soup in a hamburger joint (vegetable soup,
no less). Does any really young-thinking person ever order soup in
a hamburger joint?
As I savored the soup all of the things which separated Lloyd
Graff from the young wafted before me like steam. Come to think
of it, maybe it was steam.
However.
What truly young man almost enjoys stories written in the
most urbanely ancient appealing magazine in America, New Yorker,
or reads Eric Fromm for pleasure?
What honestly younthful male makes his bed in the morning
and ties a windsor knot. And what young man worries about bad
breath and whether his shoes are shined.
If I was actually still young why do I peel the paper off
a straw, rather than blow it off like I used to. And why don't
I enjoy juicy fruit gum and jawbreakers anymore. A jawbreaker
might wreck my dentures.
And what young man locks his car doors and always counts his
change at the movies. And thinks he's getting an ulcer when it's
only a lousy stomach ache.
And does a young man ever get heartburn from a grease-chocked
pizza.

Does a young man play bridge rather than
longer belts. Or carry an umbrella even before it
the double entendre and the unintentional pun. Or
with a handkerchief, not his unbuttoned shirt.
And has a really young man ever bemoaned hisl

poker. Or buy
rains. Or catch
wipe his glasses
loss of youth?

I

---- -

CHARLIE KINES

TOM MACK

All Photographers Interested In
Working on the MICHIGANENSIAN!

RECRUITING SUCCESSFUL:
CageCoaches Praise Frosh

He calls Keating "a steady and
strong" player while he praises
Bailey, who weighs only 190
pounds, as "quick and a fighter."
A new man will also get the
call at center. Sophomore Joe
Dayton is currently holding down
the fort, but he is being pushed
by another soph, Paul D'Eramo
and converted tackle Jerry Dan-

There will be an organizational meeting Thursday,
September 9 at 7 p.m. at 420 Maynard. Anyone
who wants to take pictures for this year's book
MUST be at this meeting. Bring your friends!

By RICK STERN ,
Faced with the possibility of
oblivion after three seasons of
unparalleled success, Michigan's
basketball team has replenished
itself and can once again look
to the future with a degree of
confidence.
With the last two years of re-
cruiting having yielded a danger-
ously thin crop of outstanding ball
players, basketball coaches Jim
Skala and Tom Jorgensen set out
last spring to fill eacti of the
eight eligible positions of tender
with a boy of Big Ten calibre.
Apparently they feel that they
have succeeded.
Best Since '61
"It's a good strong freshman
team, our best in four years,"
Major League
Standings.
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Minnesota 88 54 .626 -
Chicago 82 60 .579 6
Baltimore. 80 60 .571 7
Cleveland 77 63 .550 10
Detroit 78 64 .550 10
New York 69 75 .479 20
xs-California 64 77 .454 23Y2
Washington 62 80 .437 26
Boston 56 87 .390 32/2
x-Kansas City 51 87 .370 35
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Baltimore 2-0, Detroit 0-5
Boston 5, Cleveland 3 (10 inn)
New York 6, Washington 5
Minnesota 3, Chicago 2
California at Kansas City (inc)
TODAY'S GAMES
Minnesota at Chicago
California at Kansas.City
- Only games scheduled

commented Skala. "The boys are
big and tough and should do a
job for us."
Heading the impressive list of
recruits is a high school All-Amer-
ican from Steelton, Pa. Dennis
Stewart, a 6'7" center, was among
the most sought-after high school-
ers in the country last year. The
Wolverine, coaches scouted the
215-pounder and were impressed
by him, as was he by the Michi-
gan atmosphere and campus.
Wisconsin's Best
Next in line is Bob Sullivan, a
6'4" forward from Manitowoc,
Wis. Skala was effusive in his
praise of Sullivan. "He is prob-
ably the best player to come out
of the state of Wisconsin in 10
years. In our opinion he was the
outstanding .player in the Midwest
last season." If Sullivan is as ex-
ceptional as appearances would
indicate, then the Wolverines have
pulled off a major steal, in grab-
bing him from the hands of Wis-
consin Coach John Erickson.
Four from Ohio
And out of the clutches of,
Freddy Taylor come four Ohio
standouts, headed by a Toledo
Construction
To Beginon
Events Bldg.
The contract for the University
Events Bldg. will be finalized and
let to Spence Brothers, Saginaw
contractors, and preliminary lay-
out at the site begun at once, Ath-
letic Director H. 0. (Fritz) Cris-
ler announced, yesterday.
Cost of the multi-purpose build-
ing will be approximately $5 mil-
lion, although the figure has not
been firmly established becausefof
necessary redrafts and changes in
the drawings. January 1967 is now
the target date for completion..

product, 6'5" Dave McClellen. A
forward, McClellen hails from De-
Vilbiss High School which also is
responsible for Jim Detwiler of
football notoriety.
An Ohioan whom Skala is par-
ticularly high on is Clarence Ad-
ams from Cincinnati Withrow.
Adams is a 6'6" center who achiev-
ed All State honors.
Occupying one of the guard po-
sitions wil be 6'3" Mike Maun-
drell from Cincinnati Country
Day School.
A sixth overgrown quaddie is
Scott Montrose, 6'8," from Wyom-
ing, Ohio.:Montrose checks in at
225 pounds, making him easily
the biggest of the group.
Only Instater
The only native son on the
freshman squad is Willy Edwards,
a 6'6" Detroiter who gained All-
City honors at Northeastern High
School.
Littlest but scarcely last on the
list, is Kenneth Maxey, from the
south side of Chicago, in particu-
lar Carver High School. Maxey is
only 5'9." Skala refers to him as
"something different, but fast and
deceptive, with a deadly shot."
Good Things Come In ...
If nothing else, Maxey has be-
hind him the fact that he was
coached in high school by Larry
Hawkins, and out of the hands of
gentle, persuasive Hawkins have
come in the past two years, two
of the Big Ten's super stars -
Iowa's Gerry Jones and Wolverine
Cazzie Russell.
Skala summed up the general
reaction of the coaching to the
novitiate cagers. "At least the !
freshman-varsity game will be in-
teresting." he said.
Among the more important
players whom the Wolverines
trailed but didn't get were Lew
Alcindor, Lee LaFayette, and 6'10"
Tom Lick. The 7'1" Alcindor chose
UCLA, while the latter pair are
enrolled at Michigan State.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
JIM LASOVAGE

I

I

0

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct.
San Francisco 78 59 .569
Los Angeles 79 61 .564
Cincinnati 79 61 .564
Milwaukee 77 62 .555
Pittsburgh 77 66 .538
Philadelphia 71 68 .510
St. Louis 70 71 .497
Chicago 65 76 .461
Houston 60 80 .429
New York 45 97 .316

GB
1/
2
4
8.
10
15
191/
35Y2

I

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 12, Houston 3
Cincinnati 11, New York 2
Philadelphia 6, Milwaukee 5
Pittsburgh 2, St. Louis 1
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago at Los Angeles (n)
louston at San Francisco
Philadelphia at Milwaukee
New York at Cincinnati
Only games scheduled
DOUGOUT
CAFETERIA
Fried Chicken Seafood
Snteaks and Chops
Open Mon. thru Sot. 701 M.-8 P.m.-

U

RTENT YOUR TV
rOm
NEJAC TV RENTALS
Rent this 19" All Channel
ZENITH Portable for
only $10 per month
FREE SERVICE & DELIVERY
NEJAC TV RENTALS
CALL 662-5671
TV Set on Display at Folletf's Bookstore

I

*

Cafeteria Style
Will Serve

7 a.m.-5 p.m.
5 p.m.-8 p.m.

GOOD PRICE
1121 S. University

REGISTRATION
BEGINS SEPT. 7.
DIAG
FW(GIW ARCHI-

TEPs'

OUR PHOTOGRAPHERS
ARE HERE!
I-cuIt.AkKIAwt i

Il

0

1.1d

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan