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September 04, 1965 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1965-09-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SA'T'URDAY. SEPTEMBER 4, 1965

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,1965

Ex-Half back Clancy

I hts f or S-End SotRALSTON WINS OPENER:
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By GIL SAMBERG1
Take the name of any Michigan
halfback who started for the Blue,
in 1964 and was out during the
1965 season with a bad back.
Got it?
Now remember it! Because the
odds are the name you have in
mind is Jack Clancy and that's,
pretty good for a guess.
And, oh, Just one more thing.
Be especially good at remember-
ing it when people start speculat-
ing about split end, a position of
enough importance to be worth
Closed Practice
The football team will enter
the confines of Michigan Sta-
dium, for the first time this
season to hold a scrimmage, be-
ginning at 1:30, that is closed
to the public.
knowing about too.
Last year grid coach Bump
Elliott did some of the balancing
of his running attack with John
Henderson as a theoretical long
threat. Henderson had the speed
and he had the moves. And that's
all an end needs to make a col-
lege defensive secondary do a lot
of extra planning and modifying
that they don't want to do
against a running team. It costs
to have a couple of men accom-
pany him, in his travels down
field.
Happy Quality
And Henderson happened to
have the happy quality of being
a bad-pass catcher (read that
catcher of bad passes), which fit
in just fine with Bob Timber-
lake's throwing. But the important
thing was that Henderson could
beat defenders, and even if Tim-
berlake was not adept at throwing
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Minnesota 86 51 .628 -
Chicago 78 58 .575 7 Az
Detroit 75 66 .555 10
Cleveland 74 60 .553 10%
Baltimore 73, 59 .552 10%
New York 68 68 .500 17Y2
*California 62 74 .456 23%
Washington .60 76 .441 25
Boston .51 86. .372 35
Kansas City 49 84 .361 35
*--Los Angeles Angels have been
renamed the California Angels..
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 9, Boston 0
Baltimore 5, Cleveland 3
Minnesota 6, Chicago 4
Detroit 10, Washington 2
Kansas City 4, California 1
TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Detroit
Chicago at Minnesota
Kansas City at California (n)
Cleveland at Baltimore (n)
Boston at New York (2, t-n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

the bomb one knew that if he
wanted to try it the odds were
good that No. 81 would be there
waiting.
Well, it's 1965. And now Elliott
has a quarterback in Dick Vidmer
who is a capable passer and who
can throw- long and accurately.
And the threat, from this point
of view, is really there. But John
Henderson, the man who could
out-leg a defender, isn't.
Heir Apparent
Craig Kirby became the heir

Clancy, doubling with Kirby,
gets his crack at the Blue offense
mainly because of the decision to
have soph Rocky Rosema concen-
trate on defensive end. Earlier
both of them, along with Jeff
Hoyne and Clayte Wilhite, had
been going both ways. Rosema,
who came to Ann Arbor a half-
back and is thus no stranger to
change himself, was then picked
for the Blue defense along with
Hoyne because of his potential.
Wilhite Pressing
Wilhite, a junior and now on
the gold squad, is pressing for the
top spot, so Rosema must prove
himself conclusively. Elliott has
no doubts about the soph's ability,
but here again cited lack of ex-
perience as the problem and said
he expected improvement with
time.
"We should know about Rosema
within a week to ten days," he
said.

That is cutting it kind of close,
considering that the Wolverines'
opener at Chapel Hill is on Sept.
18, just two weeks from today.
But Elliott faces other similar
cases as the practice 'schedule,
down from four to three pre-sea-
son weeks because of the extra
join Up!
Join the Daily sports staff!
We offer fringe benefits such
as travel with the team, nickel
cokes, and comraderie. For fur-
ther information and a guided
tour call Lloyd Graff, 764-0555.
game this year, gets closer to
completion.

with less risk in regular practices.
"In two weeks when we should
be having a final scrimmage,
we'll be in that first game," lam-
ented Elliott. "And there'll be a
lot of men starting that game still
inexperienced."
Yesterday's practice centered
chiefly around kicking and re-
turns, and at this point Wilhite,
booting lefty, seems most likely to
take over Timberlake's kick-off
job.
Place-Kicking
Rick Sygar has the inside track
in the place-kicking department,
and has been practicing under
the guidance of Tony Mason,
along with Marty McVey and Paul
D'Eramo. who looked best yester-
day. But the three have been

CI I U1t,. JUAU I YIvG L kJ L(,1.1
Playing Last Tour

By The Associated Press
FOREST HILLS-This is Auld
Lang Syne for some old familiar
faces in the National Tennis
Championships at the West Side
Tennis Club-Nicola Pietrangeli,
Rafael Osuna, Manuel Santana
and possibly Roy Emerson, Fred
Stolle and Dennis Ralston.
Ralston of 'Bakersville, Calif.,1
smashed his way into the :;econd
round of the championships with
a business-like 6-0, 6-3, 6-2 vic-
tory yesterday over Jim Hobson
of USC.
Hurt by criticism of his fall-
down in the recent interzone Davis
Cup final in Spain, has indicated
he is contemplating semi-retire-
ment.

"I don't want tennis to be my
life," Ralston said.
The 32-year-old Pietrangeli, for
10 years one of Italy's best, prob-
ably will turn pro after this tour-
nament,
Pro offers have been made also
to Stolle, Australia's No. .2 ace
behind Emerson, and Santana,
the Spanish clay court whiz who
battered U.S. Davis Cup hopes in
Barcelona recently.
"This is definitely my last year."
Osuna said. "I am sure it is also
Santana's last year."
Emerson, bidding for his third
U.S. title, has repeatedly hinted
that he may quit the amateur
tour to devote more attention to
his home life and his job.

At

Pinch of Time booting up to only about 27 yards
Although 'Elliott feels the pinch with accuracy. Not an overly im-
in the abbreviated period, he has pressive figure for field goals per-
decided against extra scrimmages, haps, but it eases any worries'
feeling that more can be done about extra points.

RICK SYGAR

-46

ON

- ~a - ~a - - - a - a -

...

R

JACK CLANCY

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apparent at split end. But sure-
handed and dependable as the
senior is, he lacks the necessary
speed for the position.
Clancy's speed has never been
in doubt. He has, plenty of it, and
this brought him solidly into con-
tention with Kirby for a starting
role. But making the switch from
halfback to end-especially when
missiig a season of football in
between-would seem to add some
question marks. Still, Clancy must
be getting used to these switches,
having come to the varsity as a
quarterback and switched to right
half that first year.
'More Experience'
"He definitely can catch the
ball," said Elliott after practice
yesterday. "And as a halfback he
got his experience in open field
running and blocking. What he
needs now is more experience."
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
JIM TINDALL
DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Cozitiaued from Page s)
African-American Institute, N.Y.C.-
Various openings including 1. Field
Repres. MA in African studies, inter-
national affairs, or rel. plus some ex-
per. Located in Lusaka, Zambia. 2. Pro-
gram Officer. BA req., MA pref. Bi-lin-
gual in French & English. Exper. in
student counseling or interviewing.
N.Y.C. location. 3. Program Assistant.
BA plus office exper. for stall of
undergrad scholarship program & re-
lated duties. N.Y.C. location.
* * *
For further information, please call
764-7460, General Div., Bureau of Ap-
pointments, 3200 SAB.
a

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YESTERDAY'S GAMES
Chicago 5, San Francisco 4
Milwaukee 4, Pittsburgh 3
Los Angeles 3, Houston 0
New York 6, St. Louis 3
Cincinnati 16, Philadelphia 7
TODAY'S 'GAMES
Pittsburgh at Milwaukee
Los Angeles at Houston
San Francisco at Chicago
New York at St. Louis (p)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (n)

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