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December 10, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-10

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RADICAL FILM SERIES
Presents
"LA GUERRE EST FINIE"
Directed by ALAIN RESNAIS
Starring YVES MONTAND
Montand plays a professional revolutionary, one of the old-guard Bolshevik theorists
who fought in the Spanish Civil War and continues to fight as if it were 1936 and the
next general strike would win. "La Guerre Est Finie" was the official French entry at the
Cannes Film Festival in 1966 but was withdrawn from competition under pressure from
Franco's Spain.
"'La Guerre Est Finie' is almost dumbfoundly well made . . . scenes slide into each
other like drops of mercury rolling on polished obsidian. . . . As for Montand, his
performance is perfection and the character he creates is unforgettable."-NEWSWEEK
". ..a compendium of the virtues of one of the greatest of our contemporary direc-
tors. . . . it is the role of his (Montand's) career; his Diego is a stoical, Camus-like
figure."-NEW YORKER
WED., DEC. 10th-7, 9:30, 12, 2:30
Admission $1.00
CANTERBURY HOUSE-330 Maynard
TICKET OFFICE NVOW OPEN

page
t hree

414 P

Mfr'i~tan

Itit

NEWS PHONE:
764-0552

Wednesday, December 10, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three

1500 GREET PRESIDENT

the
news today
by The Associated Press and College Press Service

Nixon

onf routed by

SECRETARY OF STATE William P. Rodgers says the United
States has made it clear to North Vietnam that the U.S. does not
expect the Thieu government to conduct elections in South
Vietnam.
A transcript released yesterday of a Nov. 18 testimony before
the Senate Foreign Relations Committee reports that Rodgers said
the U.S. has made clear to the North Vietnamese, in private talks
and through third parties, "that we fully recognize . . . you could not
have a fair election from their standpoint under the present circum-
sances in Vietnam."
Rodgers was responding to questions on the Nixon Administra-
tion's plan for an international election commission.
SECRETARY OF STATE Rogers said yesterday the U.S. has
proposed that Israel withdraw from Egyptian territory.
The withdrawal would be made in exchange for a "binding com-.
mitment" by Cairo to establish peace.j
In a speech described by administration officials as the most
comprehensive statement on the Nixon administration's Middle East
policy, Rodgers disclosed details of the new U.S. peace proposals which
were handled to Soviet Ambassador Anatole F. Dobrynin on Oct. 28.
Rodgers said the proposal calls for direct negotiations between
Israel and Egypt on specific "safeguards" concerning the future of
the Gaza Strip and Sharm el Sheikh, the strong point guarding the
entrance to the Strait of Tiram.
Thus far, there has been no response to the proposals.

anti-war protest i~n NY

THE UNIVERSITY
OF MICHIGAN
PROFESSIONAL
THEATRE
PROGRAM

. - It . . _

JANUARY 26 - 31

FEBRUARY 2 -14

.S~. P'rofessional Preiere!

JOSE TRIANA'S

I
I

Ms

:1
HELEN .JAMES
HAYES STEWART
in
Directed by
STEPHEN PORTER
PRIOR TE4 B1tEIAIBV 1aY!

COAL MINERS FLOCKED in droves to the polls yesterday
to make their choice between the incumbent mine workers
president W. A. "Tony" Boyle, and challenger Joseph A.
Yablonski.
It is the first election for the president of the United MineI
Workers since 1923 not dominated by the late, thundering JohnI
L. Lewis, former union president who died last June.
The election climaxes a campaign flow of bitter charges, counter-
charges, and personal attacks between the two candidates. BothI
Boyle, protege of Lewis, and Yablonski, member of the union's
executive board, predicted victory.
FORMER SUPREME COURT JUSTICE Arthur J. Goldberg
announced yesterday he would not run for either senator or
governor of New York next year.
The statement left the situation or the Democratic party in New
York State up in the air. Many influential Democrats hoped Goldberg
would seek the party's nomination for one of the two posts.
Goldberg said, "I did not relinquish my seat on the Supreme
Court for the post of United States ambassador to the United Nations
with a political career in mind."
He said he planned to "pursue the objectives of peace in the
world and justice at home as a private citizen."

-Daily-Jim Judki
Piano hangs loose
The Diag is where its at, man. I mean why stay cooped up in
some stuffy practice room when I can be outside, expressing
some real feelings . . . first performance: a composition in four-
paint harmony ....

- NEW YORK (AR - A shout-
ing, brawling, window-smash-
ing mob demonstrated against
the Vietnam war Tuesday
night, as President Nixon
came to town for a Hall of
Fame dinner of the National
Football Foundation. T h e r e
were 48 arrests.
An estimated 1,500 massed origi-
nally across Park Avenue from
The Waldorf-Astoria Hotel where
the dinner was held. The Presi-
dent's limousine entered t h e
hotel's garage from a side street.
Police broke up a free-for-all in
which one youth was driven to the
pavement and kicked. An officer
was led bleeding to a patrol car
after he was struck on the head.
Stones, pennies and cardboard
signs were hurled at officers. A
Viet Cong flag was waved by one
group, while a block away a band
of about 50 pro-Nixon counter-
demonstrators flew A m e r i c a n
flags.
Windows in a bank on 48th
Street near the Waldorf were
smashed. Later, the demonstrators
marched to Fifth Avenue and the
Rockefeller Center area, breaking
airline and department store win-
dows.
The mob eventually was dis-
persed by police outside St. Pa-
trick's Cathedral.
The demonstrators chanted "an-
archy, anarchy," and "Viet Cong
victory." They carried red flags.
The demonstrators also carried
signs reading "Free Black Pan-
thers" and "LBJ 31,000 Nixon 7,-
000-GET OUT OF Vietnam."
This was a reference to Amer-
ican death totals under former
President Johnson and under Nix-
on.
A large contingent of Yo u t h
Against War and Fascism car-
ried banners proclaiming "Avenge
Fred Hampton." He was the nli-
nois Black Panther leader shot in
a gun battle with the police over
the weekend.
The Fifth Avenue V i e t n a m
Peace Parade Committee announc-
ed last Thursday it would spon-
sor the demonstrations to protest
alleged American atrocities in
Vietnam.
About an hour before Nixon's
arrival, 150 demonstrators broke
through police barricades on Park
Avenue and rushed the hotel.
Tactical Patrol Forces scatter-
ed the demonstrators and forced
them back across the eight-lane
avenue which has a wide park
strip down the middle decorated
at this season with sparkling
Christmas trees.
The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
aged by students at the University of
Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
Class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
igan, 420 Maynard St.. Ann Arbor,
Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
day through Sunday morning Univer-
sity year. Subscription rates: $10 by
carrier, $10 by mail.
Summer Session published Tuesday
through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
mail.

0

COURSE MART PROPOSALS
Unusual classes made avai'lablel

Directed by
JOHN kOUSEMAN
1966 Royal Shakespeare Company SucesshLondon!

.rizeWihnigPlay of the American University

Theatre iFestival!i!
scnatIng-bold-Innovative!"
-Boston Herald
Unlqus--marvelous sense of mood-rewar'"-

By ANITA WETTERSTROEM
Still looking around for next term's
courses? Course Mart may be Just the place
to do your last minute shopping.
Now in its third term, Course Mart pro-
vides students and faculty members an
opportunity to see their own course ideas
become reality. For next term Course Mart
has gained approval of four new courses
with six more to be decided on at the liter-
ary college curriculum committee meeting
tomorrow.
All Course Mart courses are proposed
either on the initiative of faculty members
or students and carry normal credits. Stu-
dents may. carry up to 15 credit hours of
Course Mart courses in any one academic
term.
Course Mart courses are taught by grad
students or teaching fellows with profes-
sors sponsoring them, or by professors
themselves.
The courses already established, not
listed in the Catalogue, are:

"The Politics of Vietnam," (1 credit hour
treating the domestic problems in Vietnam
in relation to western foreign policy. Or-
ganized by Stephen Schroeder, Grad, the
lectures will be given by members of the
faculty who have had experience in Viet-
nam or who teach courses tregting aspects
of Vietnam. Faculty members who have in-
dicated a willingness to participate include,
Prof. Allen Whiting, political science; Prof.
Earnest Young, history and Dr. David
Steinberg of the Center for Population
Planning.
"Analytical Study of the Phenomena of
Revolutionary Warfare," (two credit hours)
studying guerrilla warfare since World
War II by examining the writings of guer-
rilla and counterguerrilla theoreticians. To
be taught by Joseph S. Kraemer, Grad this
course will be a combination of lectures
and discussions.
"Existential Philosophy," (three credit
hours) surveying many of the major philo-
sophers in existentialism and phenomen-

ology. Sponsored by Prof. F. Bergmann,
the course will be taught by William
Schroeder, Grad, meeting once a week in
three hour session.
"Planned Change," (three credit hours)
analyzing the process of change using the
University as the focus. This course will
be taught by Gretchen Wilson, a graduate
student in Organization Psychology.
The six courses to be decided upon to-
morrow are: Counter Culture, Women in
Society, Utopian Literature and the good
Life Conscription in the U.S., Seminar on
Peace, and Socialization within the Univer-
sity.
The final listing of new courses will be
posted in Waterman Gym on Friday. Most
of them have limits between 15 and 25
students and require the permission of the
instructors for admission. All other infor-
mation will be available in the Student
Counseling offices after tomorrow's com-
mittee meeting.

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PERFECT HOLIDAY, GIFT!
Treat yourself or a friend_

-

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5 GREAT PLAYS!
2 Performances Each
1W-SAT..JAM.,2212U
"A RM EALTIUP"_
BEST PLAY
'M am t
anI d deNg
*1U1 - I
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wa: MsF)

IM)S - ., FMU.24-2n

"The LIBERTINE'
COMES ACROSS
INCREDIBLY
WITH WRY
HUMOR
AND TASTE."
-Harper's Bazraar
"The most enjoyable
sex romp of the

HELD OVER
Wed. Thurs.--7:15, 9:00
Fri., Sat.-5:30, 1:15,
9:00,10:45
.iX
persons under 18
not admitted

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BEST MUSICAL ±v
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"Catherine Spaak
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decides to become
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"Thoroughly
enjoyable . .
a classy
put-on."

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-Mich. Daily

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