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December 07, 1969 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-07

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Sunday, December 7, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page Seven'

Sunday, December 7, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY Page Seven

Lottery prompts draft questions DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

r
-------

(Continued from Page 3)
commissioned officer in. charge
of a reserve unit in Miami.
"I'm planning to duck into the
Reserves," said Paul Lipson, a
Brooklyn college student, who is
number 80 in the lottery list. "A
lot of my friends are thinking of
doing that."
Others plan to join ROTC,
among them Raymond Argila of
Seaford, N.Y., who explained:
"That means I can get deferred
while I go to law school. Then
maybe I can be an Air Force
lawyer during my term of serv-
ice."
"It looks like the lottery will
lead to an increase in o u r
ranks," said Maj. David Har-
bach, of the ROTC at St. John's
university in New York.
Meanwhile, the telephones
continue to ring at draft head-
quarters.
"We tell them their numbers
were published in the paper and
they could look up their status
as well as we could," said Geor-
gia's Selective Service direct-
or, Brig. Gen. Mike Y. Hen-
drix.
One exception was noted in
an Associated Press sampling.
In two South Dakota counties
not a single call has been receiv-
ed about the lottery. Said a
spokesman: "Good thing- I
don't know anything about it
either."
Unable to get through to their
draftboards, SouthernC a i-
fomnians inundated the draft
counseling serviceat the Uni-
versity of Southern California
with queries.
The Charleston, W. Va., draft
headquarters received a long-
distance call from a youth in
Miami, due for induction in
West Virginia in January under
a delayed enlistment program.
His was number 366 and last in
the lottery and he implored:
"Can't we back this deal up?"
The answer, with sympathy,
was no.
A mother called Col. James L.
Hays, Maryland director of Se-
lective Service, demanding to
know the draft status of her 17-
year-old son so she could plan
for his future. There was no
answer to that one, since the
minimum lottery age is 19.
Stewart Perry, chairman of
a Rochester, N.Y., board said he
called police after an irate youth
was was number 43 in the lot-
tery threatened to blow up
Perry's house.
"We have wives calling to see
if their husbands will be draft-
ed, deferred men asking if de-
ferments will continue - you
name a question, we've got it,"
said Helen Bowers, executive
secretary of the Albuquerque,
N.M., draft board.
"The phones are lit up, prac-
tically all the time," said Lilyan
C. Cook, executive secretary of

a Miami draft board. "I have a
boy sitting at my desk now who
couldn't get through the other
day. As a rule you can look at
all of our lines and they're all
red."*
Said Mrs. Juanita Armstrong,
supervising executive secre-
tary of Phoenix, Ariz., boards:
"We have had continuous calls
since the dates were drawn. As
soon as one line clears, it rings
again. We know the regulations,
but have not been informed of
the procedures."
Cleveland draft boards report-
ed themselves snowed u n d e r
with calls - including some
who simply want the board to
settle arguments over the lot-
tery setup. But their questions
often go unanswered, for lack
of infor'mation.
Ohio Selective Service head-
quarters said calls have aver-
aged 500 per day and a spokes-
man said: "The press has done
a real nice job. Without them,
we would have had a million
calls.'
Additional phone lines had to
be installed in West Virginia
draft headquarters, in Charles-
ton.
"About half of the calls we get
involve the lottery," said Col.
John W. Brokaw, upstate New
York Selective Service direc-
tor in Albany. "There's a cur-
iosity about where they stand
I have no way of knowing
at this point exactly how many
people I have who were born
on Sept. 14, for example."
Armed forces recruiting al1s o
has been affected. A Navy re-
cruiter in Albany said s o m e
youths with a high lottery prior-
ity have volunteered, w h i l e
others with a low priority have
dropped out of the recruiting
procedure,
"There really hasn't been any
meaningful change - they've
kind of equalized each other
out," he added.
Army recruiters in Seattle re-
ported a 300 per cent increase
in telephone inquiries, while the
Air Force reported a 50 per
cent rise.
Air Force and Coast Guard
recruiters i n Massachusetts
noted increased calls from
youths shopping around for a
program requiring the shortest
term of active duty. Some ex-
pressed willingness to drop out
of school temporarily to fulfill

active duty requirements and
thus be free of the draft.
Callers also include youths
already under orders to report
for induction. They want to
know if a low priority lottery
number means a reprieve. The
answer was no.
Others with a high priority
lottery number ask if they can
enlist, or if they have to wait
until they are called. They are
told they don't have to wait.
In Minneapolis, many callers
ask about deferments, and are
told there has been no change
in deferment status as a result
of the lottery. Others with low
priority lottery numbers want
to drop deferments and take
1-A status, on the theory they
von't be called during their
period of eligibility, and thus
will be free of the threat now
hanging over them when their
deferments end.
"They're being told, take it
easy," said Col. Robert P.
Knight. Minnesota state director
of selective service. "It's too
early to tell how things will
work out. We don't know yet
how far it will go."
The Sioux Falls, S.D., draft
board reported a flurry of calls
from young fathers who wanted
to know if they are liable under
the lottery drawing. They were
told the point has not been
made clear, but the assumption
is draft-age fathers will be de-
ferred.
In all the hubbub, Kevin
Hughes of New York, is high
and dry on his own little island
of security. His birthday is June
8, and his number came up
366th and last in the lottery.
"I view it with mixed emo-
tions," he said. "Although I
had nothing to do with it, I feel
almost like a draft dodger. But
don't get me wrong. I don't
plan to sign up."
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(Continued from Page 2) 9 for test on Feb. 14, and another test
Degree Recital: John McCormick, or- given later, applications due Feb. 4, for
gan studio, 2110 School of Music, 8:00 test on aMrch 14. Information at S.P.S.
p.m.

See

the

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Placement Serice ORGANIZATION
GENERAL DIVISION
3200 S.A.B. NOTICES
Interviewing Season over for fall 1969: : ::: '::<1
If you have not secured employment,
please drop in to Placement services University Lutheran Chapel, Dec. 7,
before you leave campus to register, or, 9:30 and 11:00, 1511 Washtenaw, 20th
if you are registered, leave your post- Anniversary Service, Communion at
graduation address. Current opening 1]:00, sermon by thetRev. Alfred T.
listings, directories, company literature Scheips, "On Leaving the Teens".
and many other aids available. If you
have received job offers please report Gamma Delta, Dec. 7, 1511 Washtenaw
them for statistical purposes. Always Avenue. 6:00 p.m., supper followed by
keep your file up to date and tell is Christmas Open House 6:45 to 8:15,
when you have gotten a job, or made carols and cookies. *
other plareer Conferences held in ma- Inforn Yourself: Hear representatives
Xma Caee Cofeencs hldin a-from Young Americans for Freedom,
jor areas, we list a few, check poster Young Democrats and SDS. Dec. 8, 7:30
in Career Planning, 3200 SAB for com- p.m.. International Center (next to the
plete list. Welcome students native to Union). Sponsored by International
the area or any others interested In Students Association.
opportunities there, December of Spring
graduates.
Representatives from business, in- Litter doesn't throw
dustry, government, schools, profes-
sions will speak with students, giving itself away; Titter
information on employment opportuni-
ties. Some conferences require advance doesn't just happen.
registratin, and/or student r e s u m e
forms. Pick up these at Career Plan- People cause it-and
nl, only people can prevent;
Minneapolis, St. Paul, Mina. it. "People" means you.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE Keep America Beautiful.
212 S.A.B., Lower Level
Applications for Summer Civil Service ' _ dvertising contributed
examinations are available at S.P.S.,Iadrtising o d
they are due in Washington by Jan. ,frthe public good
Univxrsit of Michi ai

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"'YES A MONSTER'S ON THE LOOSE." I+
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Far from the reaches of Kingdom and pope
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Later some bought slaves to gather riches
And still from near and far to seek America
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Westward in saddle and wagon it went
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Many the lives which had come to an end
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We began the slaughter of the red man
But still from the near and far to seek America
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To be their spirit and guiding light.
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They stuffed it just like a hog
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Its keepers seemed generous and kind
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