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December 07, 1969 - Image 4

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Number 18 Night Editor: Martin A. Hirschman

December 7, 1969

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A

cynical review of the fall semester past

'ND OF SEMESTER. Time to take all the things we should
have learned three months ago and cram them into our
heads in some semblance of order, time to throw out the dusty
old newspapers upstairs and make room for the pre-exam
memorization.
But lest we forget, in our eagerness to bring in the new,
that there is another life beyond the bluebook, we present here
a somewhat jaded capsule history of the world here and else-
where, as it went this semester. With the help of a few line
drawings by Conrad and Feiffer, we move down Memory Lane,
suspicious but not quite convinced that the joke of the car-
toons is really on us.
Another month, another travesty. Atty. Gen. John Mitchell
attempted to permit a slowdown in the 15 year process of
school desegregation. Fortunately, he was checked by a Su-
preme Court unwilling to ignore its own precedents. But Hur-
ricane Laurie wreaked a vengeance of her own, ploughing into
the Gulf Coast and leveling small towns in the process.
Back in Washington, the administration courted Latin
American friendship by backing up New York Gov. Nelson
Rockefeller's infamous goodwill trip with "Operation Inter-
cept," designed to coerce the Mexican government into en-
forcing its own law against the free flow of international
commerce. To everyone's relief, the expensive operation was
abandoned after traffic jams developed from Tijuana to the
border. The prices of funny cigarettes have gone back to
normal.
Meanwhile, other prices continue to climb. But the Nixon
Administration has won its surtax and its anti-inflationary
measures seem to be taking effect (despite the perverse union
action in the G.E. strike). That means many fathers will be
out of work after Christmas, if they aren't already.
Back in Ann Arbor, the "quiet campus" erupted over
economic issues. After several guerrilla skirmishes between
anti-ROTC protesters and the Ann Arbor police videotape
squad, radical students concentrated their efforts where the
masses were-behind the establishment of a University book-
store. The long smoldering controversy over the store culmi-
nated in a sit-in at the LSA Bldg. When the smoke cleared
109 people had been arrested, the Regents had finally agreed
to set up the bookstore and Robben Fleming had scored two
points by outflanking Sheriff Doug Harvey.
At UCLA, the regents proved even less flexible. Voices
from the past, they attempted to block the appointment of
Angela Davis, an avowed Communist, to the faculty. They
invoked an ancient bylaw, but the courts upheld the Con-
stitution.
At the same time, a Chicago court was staging the show
trial of eight individuals accused of conspiring to get them-
selves attacked by police during last year's Democratic Con-
vention. The prosecution spent the entire semester putting
forth their case, while Judge Julius Hoffman made it clear
who was in charge by arresting defense attorneys, gagging
defendant Bobby Seale, and, finally, sending Seale to prison
for four years on a 16-point citation for contempt.
As the much-heralded Oct. 15 Moratorium Day approach-
ed, the Nixon administration responded predictably with pleas
for national unity, calling for a "moratorium on protest"
against the Vietnam war. Sen. William Fulbright obliged (out
of new-found senatorial courtesy) by cancelling Foreign Re-
lations Committee hearings on the war, but no one else was
much deterred, and the Oct. 15 demonstrations proved a
model of peaceful protest that even the Attorney General could
not fault.
The Nixon non-policy on Vietnam enunciated Nov. 3,
is more intriguing. In a long-awaited speech, Daddy Dick
informed the "silent majority" that he would take care of
Vietnam, so they needn't bother their heads about it. He did
tell them what they could worry about, though - those freaks
who would march on the Capitol in 10 days.
The vice president stole the limelight. Harrassing the ar-
rogant and liberal establishment media barons, he won support
for the Administration's upcoming campaign to revoke the Bill
of Rigts through a national referendum.
Agnew should go to Japan. There, violent and massive
protests by students reached a high point in Tokyo last month
when thousands strove to prevent Prime Minister Sato from
leaving the country to negotiate with the U.S. over the return
of Okinawa. Sato did manage to leave and reached an agree-

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~How come it takes a hurricane to integrate
the housing here in Mississippi ."

-Daily--Andy Sacks

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