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December 06, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-12-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ALICE'S RESTA

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'trl igan

NEWS PHONE: 764-0552
at~ BUSINESS PHONE: 764-0554

presents
THE SKRU
former Garrick Hu Ensemble
9:00 P.M.
50C
ALICE LLOYD PILOT PROGRAM

Saturday, December 6, 1969 Ann Arbor, Michigan Page Three
Campus +creations: Daringf new styles in classes
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By CAROL HILDEBRAND
Although the lecture-recitation com-
bination remains University fashion
for most classes, some courses have
broken away from the more traditional
style.
This year's Economics 201 student,
for example, may choose how he will
learn economics. He can elect lecture-
recitation, reading-tutorial, or research
and study programs.
When the reading-tutorial program
was tried experimentally, students
"learned more than in the regular
sections," says economics Prof. Daniel
Fusfeld, who instituted the changes
in the economics course.
Those following reading-tutorial-pro-
grams attend lecture once a week.
After the first examination they select

an in-depth reading program to cover
the rest of the course. Small tutorial
groups meet with teaching fellows once
every two or three weeks.
Poverty in Washtenaw County, the
Ann Arbor cost-of-living and economic
problems of underdeveloped nations
have been a few of the research pro-
jects undertaken by students in the
research and study program.
Research students work on their
research topic but go to one lecture
and one recitation a week to cover
basic course material.
Some students are doing basic re-
search on economic inter-relationships
in the urban setting. Others, mean-
while, carry on practical projects right
in the community. Two students are
working with a Catholic parish in De-

troit organizing community projects.
"The effort right now is to help
people determine what their needs
are," says Fusfeld. "We can then back
their efforts with expertise."
An urban redevelopment seminar
started two years ago after the Detroit
riots also meets every week or two at
Fusfeld's home.
"At the seminars we have two types
of discussion," says Fusfeld. "We dis-
cuss research that has already been
done, and we discuss policy."
Students from the Student Coun-
seling Office are learning to be better
counselors in another class. Two hours
a week they participate in a newly ac-
credited counseling course, Psychology
502.
Peer-counseling, the philosophy of

helping, and interviewing take on new
dimensions during the relaxed dis-
cussions.
The instructions, University psychol-
ogists Lou Rice and Dave Patch, lead
discussions and plan revealing exer-
cises that help students understand
attitudes andanxieties in both coun-
selor and counseled.
"Students relate this course to their
real life needs," says Rice. He calls it
an "experimental-type" class.
During one session, a girl played the
role of interested counselor while her
friend enacted a troubled student.
After a ten-minute extemporaneous
interview, other students criticized the
counselor's performance and m a d e
suggestions.
"You didn't quit asking questions

I

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-JlR'-"M

U"..

BERGMAN'S
WILD STRAWBERRIES
"Bergman is great. I really liked
CASABLANCA."-Agnew
PLUS-
THE RED BALLOON
"Outstanding."-Trotsky
DECEMBER 5-6

long enough for him to tell you what
was really bothering him," one boy
remarked.
"You should have started by asking
him about his reactions to University
life in general," advised another.
Nearly 40 education students travel
to Inkster schools each week in one
phase of the school's developing urban
education program.
"It's basically a realistic introduc-
tion to the teaching profession," says
Charles Keen, a placement super-
visor.
"Some kids are really turned off to
teaching now," Tony Moss '71, com-
mented. Moss spends six hours a week
in Inkster High School's world his-
tory classes.
Hels1iK1
ar-ms talks
progress
Initial discussion
to finish soon

FRI.-SAT.

7:00 and 9:15

the
news,,today
by~ The Asso (cidPress andi College Press Sevvice

AUD. A 75c (cheap)

Next Week: DARLING
HASIDIC WEEKEND
FRIDAY, DEC. 5-SUNDAY, DEC. 7
At THE HOUSE
1429 HILL ST.
FRIDAY, DEC. 5-SATURDAY, DEC. 6
A VISIT BY THE "LUBAVITCHER
HASIDIM"
FRIDAY
4:30 P.M.-LIGHTING THE HANUKAH
CANDLES
5:00 P.M.-SERVICES
5:30 P.M.-TRADITIONAL SABBATH
MEAL WITH SINGING
(Call Hillel for
Reservations-663-4129)
SATURDAY
9:00 A.M.-TRADITIONAL SERVICES
12:00 NOON-SABBATH MEAL
2:00 P.M.-STUDY SESSION
4:00 P.M.-MINCHAH SERVICE
FOLLOWED BY SHALESHUDDS
6:00 P.M.-EVENING SERVICES
SUNDAY, DEC. 7
5:30 P.M.-HANUKAH CANDLES LIT
6:00 P.M.-DELI HOUSE
6:30-7:30 P.M.-ISRAELI DANCING
8:00 P.M.-PROFESSOR ABRAHAM KAPLAN,
PHILOSOPHY DEPT. SPEAKING ON
"THE PHILOSOPHY OF HASIDISM"
SATURDAY AND SUNDAY MATINEES
HELP-12:30 adults, $1.50-children, 75c
SUBMARINE-2:00
HELP-3:30 F 'iTH Forum
SUBMARINE--5:00 °'^°^'
4
! i
The Colorful Adventures of~
THEBEATESi
are more Colorful than ever.. in COLORI
EASTMANCOLOR A UNITED ARTISTS RELEASE

CHICAGO POLICE raided the apartment of a Black Pan-
ther leader and seized an unregistered pistol and some ammuni-
tion
The raid on the apartment of Bobby Rush, Panther deputy mm-
:ister of defense, came a day after two other Panthers were killed in
a gun battle with police.
Rush's apartment was unoccupied when nine policemen battered
down the door and entered. They f o u n d a gun, several hundred
rounds of ammunition and U.S. Army instruction manuals on con-
structing booby traps and explosives.
Rush is regarded as heir-apparent to Fred Hampton, Illinois
chairman of the Black Panther Party, who was fatally shot early
Thursday in a police raid. Also killed in the raid was Mark Clark,
downstate leader of the Illinois Panthers.
Meanwhile the American Civil Liberties Union called on the
National Commission on Violence to investigate the deaths of
Hampton and Clai'k.
Spokesman Jay Miller said the killings "seem a part of a nation-I
wide pattern of police action against the Panthers."
THE SENATE voted for minimum monthly Social Security
payments of $100 and a 15 per cent increase in other payments.
The unexpected approval of the $100 minimum amendment, pro-
posed by Sens. Mike Mansfield (D-Mont.) and Robert Byrd (D-W. V.).
came on a 48-41 vote. The present minimum monthly payment is
I$55.
The House Ways and Means Committee had approved a blanket
15 per cent increase for everybody and it was believed the House
would follow the recommendation. The Mansfield-Byrd proposal will
cost $6.2 billion a year, $2 billion more than the straight 15 per cent
increase.

Troop
Deputy Secretary of Defense Dav
from South Vietnam will contin
South Vietnam. Packard said pro
ing troops home.

SYRIA released two imprisoned Israelis in exchange for 13 HELPLESS CIVILI
Syrians held in Israel.
Schlomo Samueloff and Salah Muallem were aboard a TWA air-
liner hijacked to Damascus on Aug. 29. While the rest of the passen-N su rve
gers and crew of the plane were allowed to leave Syria, the pair were
kept in jail.
After their release, Samueloff and Muallem flew to Athens and -
then to Tel Aviv where they were welcomed by Israeli Prime Minister C rL i r i
Golda Meir. Israel then freed the Syrians near Quneitra in the Israeli-
held Golan Heights. UNITED NATIONS, N.Y. OP) -
Public health a n d medical au-
CHIEF JUSTICE WARREN BURGER appointed 10 federal thorities would f i n d themselves
judges to oversee the out-of-court activities of all federal judges, virtually helpless to protect ci-
Three of the judges will act as a review committee, receiving re- vilians from the horrors of Chem-
ports every three months of any payments over $100 federal judges This was the conclusion of a
receive for off-bench activities. Any violations of ethical standards study by a panel of experts re-
will be reported to the U.S. judicial conference, cruited by the World Health Or-,
The other seven-man committee will work as an advisory panel ganization and released at U.N.
which will give federal judges opinions on teaching, lecturing, writing, headquarters yesterday.
work with charitable organizations and service on boards of colleges, The report came as the United'
churches and other nonprofit institutions when requested. Nations . was considering a Brit-
* ish treaty to outlaw use of biolo-
gieal weapnns and n.a Sovit-snn-

p .%'> a ; HELSINKI (P)--The third week
of U.S.-Soviet strategic arms lim-
itation talks ended yesterday with
agreement apparently near in the
6preliminary phase.
The two delegations held a sev-
enth working session of 90 min-'
utes and scheduled their n e x t
closed meetings for Monday.
Conference sources said the first
round of the talks probably 'would
wind up in 10 to 14 days, with
full-scale talks taking place after
Jan. 1 qt a place, still to be de-
termined.
The third week was marked by
developments elsewhere t h a t
heightened the belief things were
-Associated Press going well here.
U.S. Secretary of State William
1 With ruawals to 0 Contrine P. Rogers and DefenseSecretary
Melvin R. Laird both spoke out
vid Packard tells reporters yesterday that U.S. troop withdrawals positively about SALT at the At-
ue despite significant increases in North Vietnamese infiltration into lantic Alliance meeting in Brus-
gress in "Vietnamization" will allow the United States to keep bring- sels. Rogers said the talks were
proceeding on encouraging lines.
Laird described them "as progres-
sing very well."
ANS: In Moscow the Soviet military
establishment stopped the cold
war-like pronouncements that had
ed ic l lashed with the non-polemic na-
Spredicts medical ture of exchanges here. It looked
as if the Kremlin had told the
marshals to avoid an activity that
r g rwrthreatened to interfere with SALT
a germprogress.
In Helsinki, joint U.S.-Soviet
The experts came up with five -While advanced weapons sys- secrecy on matters under discus-
main conclusions: tems would be required on a mili- lion continued, making it ipos-
- Chemical and biological wea- tarily significant scale against sible to know if things were going
pons pose a special threat to civil- ( large civilian targets, isolated sab- asBfavorabl as thhe eetne
ians because of the often Indis- otage attacks could be effective But the fact that the meetings
iinatbeaue of she eapns, against civilian targets with use have gone on for three w e e k s
aid because high concntration i of some biochemical agents under showed that neither s i d e had
and ecase hgh oncetraion n ,come up against anything which
military operations could lead to certain circumstances. me it anst athe starh
significant, unintended involve- The experts predicted what A further indication of h a r-
ment of civilians. could occur in a city of five mil- mony was that both sides agreed
- Large-scale or even limited lion people in a developed coun- , on how little more time will be
use of some weapons could cause try if it were exposed to strains needed for the preliminary phase,
illness to a degree that would ov- of tularemia - commonly called both saying it would be over be-
erwhelm existing health resources rabbit fever. fore Christmas.
and facilities. + They said if a half-million per-
- Large-scale use of biochemi-1 sons w e r e exposed to infective The Michigan Daily, edited and man-
cal weapons could cause lasting doses, at least 250,000 clinical cas- aged by students at the University of
1 dses atleat 20,00 cinial as-Michigan. News phone: 764-0552. Second
dangers of an unpredictable na- es could be expected. They envis- class postage.peadat nn Arbor, Mich-
ture to man's environment, aged that about a third would igan. 420 Maynardi St., Ann Arbor,
-Possible effects of the wea-: take flight from the city imme-, Michigan 48104. Published daily Tues-
pons are subject to a high degree diately, but those remaining would day throughSunday morningiver-
requre atibotic in he irst48sity year. Subscription rates: 1$10 by
of uncertainity and unpredicta-.require antibiotics in the first 48 carrier, $10 by mail.
bility, because of complex a n d hours. summer session published Tuesday
variable meteorlogical, physiolo- Of those receiving antibiotics through Saturday morning. Subscrip-
gical, epidemiological and envir- 25,000 would need hospitalization tion rates: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by
onmental factors. and about 2,500 would die. mai

U.S. TROOP WITHDRAWALS from South Vietnam will con- sored treaty to ban use of both
tinue despite increased North Vietnamese infiltration, Deputy chemical and biological weapons.
Defense Secretary David Packard said. The General Assembly is ex-
Packard, recently back from a trip to South Vietnam, said pro- pected to refer both treaties to the
gress in "Vietnamization" of the war will allow further withdrawals disarmament negotiators in Ge-
of U.S. forces. He added, however, that the administration was con- neva.
cerned about "rather substantial increases" in North Vietnamese in_ The United States has expressed
filtration into the South. support in principle for the Brit-
Meanwhile, the Viet Cong announced they will honor three-day ish treaty. President N I x o n re-
nounced late last month the use
cease-fires for Christmas and New Year's and threatened to punish by the United States of biochemi-r
any allied violations. cal weapons.
"A COMPLETE .DELIGHT!
I'M IN LOVE WITH IT!
SNominate Claude Berri as head idol of my cult!"
JUDITH CRIST--New York Magazine

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"Beri has a sense of humor
that gives his films a unique
presence!"
VINCENT CANBY-N.Y. Times
"Delightful
human comedy!
Just right
for the
dating
crowd!"

~zAv

"Delicious slices of life illumi-
nate the screen."

CUE MAGAZINE
"A French
Goodbye Columbus!'
Rich, rewarding
and enchanting as
'Fiddler On The

CINEMA OULD
Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 6-7
SHOCK CORRIDOR'
dir. SAMUEL FULLER (1963)
CINEMA GUILD is PROUD to Announce the third
Directors' Festival to be held in February will feature
Samuel Fuller.
In preparation for this Festival Mr. Fuller has kindly I
lent us his personal print of "Shock Corridor" for this
showing.
.a

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bob
sre

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*R

VILLAGER

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