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December 04, 1969 - Image 3

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Fleming: 'U' as General Motors

PRE-FINAL HILLEL
GRAD
MIXER
Sunday, Dec. 7-8PM-1429 Hill

By DAVID SPURR
Our Staff Cynic
The west lounge of Bursley Hall on
North Campus reminds one of the lobby of
a resort hotel for the nouveau-riche in the
Adirondacks.
Its sound-proof ceilings, imitation oak
panelling, and sleek grey carpeting-all
overlooked by the colorless portrait of some
withered benefactress-seem a monument
to blandness and mediocrity.
University President Robben Fleming
failed to disturb the stale atmosphere
which perpetually permeates the lounge in
an "informal" talk last night with some 30
students from the North Campus complex.
Responding to a letter from an incensed
Bruce Wilson, the Student Government
Council co-ordinating vice president who
confessed he was "pushed nearly to taking
drastic action" concerning the issue of a
Bursley discount store, Fleming spun off
an impressive series of cost estimates, in-

ventory figures, and accounting reports for
the present discount bookstore.
Fleming explained the Regents would not
consider establishing a Bursley branch of
the discount store-now operating in the
Union-until they had reviewed the store's
bookkeeping for the entire semester.
"I myself have supported the Bursley
store and will continue to support it,"
Fleming asserted in a moment of rare
emotion.
Wilson's letter, which no one could help
but notice had been "Reprinted by Bursley
RYM-II-SDS,"' also included an impas-
sioned plea for "one hour per month" of
the Regents' time during which SGC could
bring proposals for action before them.
Fleming, sensing what could have been
a thinly-disguised attempt to cut the Uni-
versity administration out of the decision-
making process, warned, "They should not
go directly to the Regents without first
seeing members of the administration."

But the president's inimitably equivocat-
ing manner once more rose to the occa-
sion. "I think some provision should be
made for them (SGC) to come through
and make their pitch."
Fleming had already launched onto an-
other soporific cost-estimate tangent con-
cerning dining halls when a black student
interrupted with a plea for an immediate
"statement of policy on what the Univer-
sity is doing for blacks."
The president cited a couple of pro-
grams and proposals under study, then
quickly reverted to what must keep uni-
versity presidents awake at night-"our
old friend," the question of money.
"I think we definitely ought to say what
our program concerning black students
will be over the next five years. Our big-
gest problem is money..."
A long-haired student faded away be-
hind the plastic sliding doors. "General
Motors, General Motors," he muttered.

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BERGMAN'S
WILD STRAWBERRIES
"Bergman is great. I really liked
CASABLANCA."-Agnew
PLUS-
THE RED BALLOON
"Outstanding."-Trotsky

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by The AssociatedI Press and Colleg~e Press Service

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page three

DECEMBER 5-6
7:00 and 9:15 AUD. A

FRI.-SAT.

75c (cheap)

Next Week: DARLING
NED'S
BOOKSTORE
YPSILANT I
This new store carries more trade (non-text) books
than any other in the Ann Arbor-Ypsilanti area.
Unusual 1970 calendars, thousands of paperbacks,$
lots of them used, some hardbacks.-
GIFT BOOKS AND CALENDARS
FROM $375 (DALI ALICE) DOWN
Mon.-Thurs.--9-9; Fri.-9-6; Sat.--12:5:30
We think we're interesting-
We hope you will.
S4
1 0

THE LARGEST CUT in military appropriations since the end,
of the Korean War has been approved by the House Appropria-
tions Committee. k
The $69.96 billion appropriation bill knocks $5.32 billion off Pres-
ident Nixon's original request to bring military spending in line with
cuts announced by Secretary of Defense Melvin Laird.
The bill cuts $2 million for biological weapons in response to
Nixon's announcement that the United States will no longer stock-
pile them. The bill also makes other unspecified germ warfare cuts of
$10.5 million.
The committee attributes $483.5 million of the cut directly to re-
ductions in Vietnam War costs.
The House is expected to pass the bill early next week and send
it to the Senate.
A SOCIAL SECURITY BENEFIT increase of 15 per cent, ef-
fective January 1, has been approved by the House Ways and
Means Committee.
Chairman WilburMills (D-Ark.) said he expects the House will
probably pass the bill next week. This would allow time for Senate
action before Congress adjourns for Christmas.
The increase would raise the present average payment from about
$100 a month to about $115. The minimum payment, now $55 a
month, would rise to $63.25.
Because of the time required to adjust the Social Security Ad-
ministration's checkwriting machinery, beneficiaries would not receive
the first larger check until April. At that time they would receive a
retroactive payment for increases from the beginning of the year.
* * *
HOUSE ACTION on an administration-backed bill to con-
tinue the anti-poverty program without major changes has been
called off suddenly to avert its possible defeat.
The last minute change in plans was designed to give backers of'
the bill time to rally opposition to an alternative proposal that would
give the states major control over federally financed anti-poverty,
efforts.
Backers of the administration bill, mostly Democrats, claimed
they had not had any time to study the substitute proposal, and called
for its sudden postponement. It would make major changes in the
operations of the Office of Economic Opportuntity, shifting authority'
for many anti-poverty programs to the states.
THE PENTAGON has summoned the commander of t h e
company involved in the alleged MyLai massacre for questioning
about a 1968 field investigation which claimed that no massacre
had occurred.F
The Army said Capt. Ernest Medina is scheduled to appear for
questioning today before a panel headed by Lt. Gen. William R. Peers.
The Pentagon said Peers could recommend filing of charges if
his group determines that officers involved in the original investiga-
tion tried to cover up the My Lai incident.

Thursday, December 4, 1969

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Page Three

e NATO sets
new nuclear
poli*cygides
Y9
Allies give U.S.
top priority ini
A-bomb decision
BRUSSELS (M -- The North
Atlantic allies sealed plans
yesterday that, Western dip-
lomats said, give the President
of the United States the sole
right to press the nuclear but-
ton on behalf of the NATO al-
liance.
Defense ministers of 14 NATO
nations - with France abstaining
--agreed on new guidelines for
making the ultimate decision
whether to u s e tactical nuclear
-Associated Press weapons against an attacker.
'sistersThese guidelines set a pattern
sisters of political and military consul-
tation, the diplomats said, which
second from right), speaks at a leaves the final decision to the
nadian Council of Churches. The U.S. chief executive. They s a i d
sisters in exile in Canada. there appeared to be no qualifi-
cations. The President would pos-
sess the inviolate right even to
reject the advise of his Allied
partners.
* Britain and France are the only
C O 11 N other nuclear members of NATO.
('U.,All Britain's nuclear weapon re-
sources in the NATO a r e a are
unteers are not forced to partici- committed to the supreme com-
pate and are not given any special mander of Allied forces, who is an
inducements. All are thoroughly American general. He is bound to
briefed on the purpose, procedure consult the President on any sit-
and risks of each project, the of- uation involving the use of these
ficials say. weapons.
The center is also working on an France, in theory, has the right
alarm system to warn troops and to act alone but not in NATO's
civilians of dangerous biological name.
agents in the air long before dis- The ministers also adopted two
eases can be diagnosed. secret plans, designed to give the
~^~^ -_ ~~^West more time to repel an in-
vader before resorting to the use
)olic blasted of nuclear missiles, and setting
forth how and where nuclear
weapons could be used in case of
Members of the conference also a westward thrust by Communist

Help for exiled draft re
Rev. Dr. Floyd Honey, general secretary of the Canadian Council (s
meeting of leaders of the National Council of Churches and the Can
groups disclosed plans for new liason activities helping U.S. draft res
DEFENSE RESEARCH:
Germ warfare study

"The LIBERTINE'
COMES ACROSS-
INCREDIBLY
WITH WRY
HUMOR
AND TASTE."
-flaipc(J O aJJr

1

I x:I
persons under 18.
not admitted
Thur.--7:15, 9:00
Fri. -7:15, 9:00,
10:45
Q
fahes
Hugh Hefner's
Playboy Penthouse
looc like a
nurserg school"

OVER
HELD

DIAL
5-6290

"Liza Minnelli has given a performance which
is so funny, so moving, so perfectly crafted and
realized that it should win her an Academy
Award but probably won't, because Oscar is
archaic and Liza is contemporary!"
-Thomas Thompson, LIFE MAGAZINE

a

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3,
i
,

FREDERICK, Md. ;') - Al-
though President Nixon announc-
ed last week that the U n i t e d
States will never resort to germ
warfare and promised to destroyE
existing stockpiles of bacteriolo-
gical weapons, research into de-
fenses against germ warfare *at-'
tacks continues.
At Ft. Detrick, the $100-million
main Army biological research
center here, Col. Ephram M. Ger-
shater, the commanding officer,
says the post's mission is "heavily
defensive."
Strains of bacteriological agents
like plague, Q fever, anthrax and
encephalitis have been developed
at Ft. Detrick, Gershater says, so
Army researchers can prepare vac-
cines to neutralize or soften the
blow of bacteriological attacks.
According to researchers, ideal
bacteriological warfare agents are3

U.S. hunger i
WASHINGTON (/P) - Members
of the White House Conference on
Food, Nutrition and Health yes-
terday called for an annual cash
income of $5,500 for a family of
four as the "number one remedy
for hunger" in America.
President Nixon's proposed as-
sistance legislation would "provide
only $1,600 for a family of four

1
i
1

fairly easily. They quickly 1 o s e
their potency and thus, occupying:
forces can safely move into an
area after an attack.I
Some experimentation is donel
with human volunteers, mostly
conscientious objectors fulfilling
their military obligation, under a
program dubbed "O p e r a t i o n
Whitecoat."
Ft. Detrick officials say the vol-

IOatheritte Spaak '
is Curious Green,
with envy ..and
decides to become
a one-woman
.Kinsey sexr survey."

highly infectious, short-term dis- 'supplemented by
eases which can be controlled stamps.

$750 in food j

demanded that Nixon reduce the armies,
price of food stamps. In f
Several ethnic and other groups guidelin
took independent action to try weapon
and dramatize their demands. were c
The Mexican-American and re- their st
ligious caucuses joined forces in
calling for participants to fast for The M
the remainder of the conference aged by
and to turn in their $18.30 in daily class po
food tickets provided by the con- igan, 42c
ference to be given to some char- Michigan
ity. day thrc
sity yea
Dr. Jean Mayer, the conference carrier, $
director, told a news conference Summi
the fast was "a very regrettable through
thing. No way can the money be tion rat
saved by turning in the tickets." mall.

ormulating new rules and
nes on the use of nuclear
s, t h e defense ministers
confirming and updating
rategy of flexible response.
ichigan Daily, edited and man-
students at the University of
n. News phone: 764-0552. Second
stage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich-
0 Maynard St., Ann Arbor,
n 48104. Published daily Tues-
ugh Sunday morning Univer-
r. Subscription rates: $10 by
$10 by mail.
er Session published Tuesday
Saturday morning. Subscrip-
es: $3.00 by carrier, $3.00 by

NOW

dEm

DIAL
8-6416

- e tl~f

RADLEY M M,(;E I
presents
I"THE LiB EA!TNE'
Catherine Spaak and Jean-Louis Trintignant
I'~rue by SihM C...MLilI.a Dmd dby P.,q.I w i .at ~
EASTMANCOL~iq
UIck...dth-f,.11g. SAUDURONFIM

SP;TH FLoruV
SATURDAY and SUNDAY MATINEES

Help-12:30, 3:30
Submarine-2:00, 5:00

STOP WORRYING I.
3C
S,

.KS
r
(( IY
I
'It (!

Pgrornount Pictures Presents An A !j kk Producti
M Cuckoo
S.0TECHNICOLORj
[tet i 1fM nd Hi . k dd Brkn TrnMdte
-T
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4
THE INFORMER
dir. JOHN FORD-1935

"A COMPLETE DELIGHT. I'M IN LOVE WITH
IT!" -New York Mag.
"DELIGHTFUL HUMAN COMEDY! Just right
for the dating crowd!" -N.Y. Daily News
"GO TO 72nd ST. FOR A GOOD LAUGH ...
a swell movie ... BRAVO BERRI!" -Villager

. .........._.

"AFFECTIONATE AND
you feel good !"

BEGUILING! Makes
-N ewsday

y
!
" l,
i
f c
...

3RD
WEEK

Program Information 662-6264

"'EASY RIDER' IS TERRIBLY POWERFUL!"
-RICHARD GOLDSTEIN. N.Y. TIMES
"AN HISTORIC MOVIE!""AN ELOQUENT FILM."
-RICHARD SCHICKEL, LIFE -ROLAND GELATT, SATURDAY REVIEW
"ASTONISHINGLY PERFECT!" "GO.SQUIRM!"
ARCHER WINSTEN, NEW YORK POST -LOOK MAGAZINE
"WILL KNOCK YOU OUT OF YOUR SEAT!"
-ABCTV
EXTRAORDINARYACHIEVEMENT!"
--NEW REPUBLIC
"THE IMPACT IS DEVASTATING!"
-JUDITH CRIST, NEW YORK MAGAZINE
"A MAJOR RAKEHELL FILM !"
TIME

SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00
5:00-7:00
anid
9:05 P.M.

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